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MoonDragon's Health & Wellness Therapy Information
Herbal Tinctures & Tonics
INDIGESTION TONIC RECIPES


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  • Indigestion Tonic Recipe
  • Herbal Descriptions
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  • HERBAL TINCTURES & TONICS


    fennel


    INDIGESTION TONIC

    1 Tablespoon Fennel Seed
    1 Tablespoon Anise Seed (Aniseed)
    1 Tablespoon Coriander Seed
    1 Tablespoon Caraway Seed

    Mix together fennel seed, aniseed, coriander seed, and caraway seed. Bruise 1 teaspoon of this mixture. Pour 1 cup of boiling water over the bruised seed, cover and allow to steep until cool. Sweeten and drink warm or cool. Settles indigestion fast.





    HERBAL DESCRIPTIONS

    ANISE SEED HERBAL PROFILE

    n.gif"> Anise (Pimpinella anisum) is a member of the family of plants that includes carrots, caraway, cumin, dill, fennel, and cilantro. Of all of these umbels, anise is the plant that has the strongest licorice flavor. The essential oil of anise is used to flavor licorice candy which is usually made without any licorice at all.

    Anise seed is a seed-like fruit delivering a warm, sweet, licorice-like flavor to sweet and savory dishes alike. Try it in everything from fruit pies, cookies, and cakes to slaws, liquors, and meat dishes. It is potent, so start with just a pinch! Anise is a member of the Umbelliferae family which also includes fennel, caraway, coriander and dill, to name a few. It requires a long, warm, frost-free growing season of at least 120 days, and thrives in poor, dry soil. Growing to a height of 18 inches, the plant features small white flowers in early summer. The seeds appear in late summer and are light greenish-brown to brown when dried. Although the seed has an aroma and flavor reminiscent of licorice, the two are completely unrelated. The dry, ripe fruits (seeds) should be harvested between July and September. Anise seed is used extensively to flavor liquors, cookies, cakes, fruit dishes, coleslaw, rye bread, apple pie and meats. It also makes a wonderful addition to teas. Used primarily with the digestive system as it relieves flatulence and helps to improve the appetite; helps allay the pain of colic; promotes milk production in nursing mothers; helps to remove excess mucus from the system. Helps improve appetite, relieves flatulence, allys the pain of colic, promotes milk prodution in nursing mothers, and helps to remove excess mucus from the body. Helps to normalize estrogen levels. More than a flavoring, Anise soothes the digestive tract and contains B vitamins, calcium, magnesium, and iron.

    Constituents: The sweet fragrance of the anise fruit and its essential oil is due to to trans-anethole, making up to 90-percent of the oil. Other components of the taste and smell of anise include estragol (iso-anethole), anise aldehyde, anise alcohol, p-methoxy-acetophenone, pinene, limonene, and gamma-himachalene (2-percent).

    Parts Used: The whole dried fruit or seed.

    Typical Preparations: Whole or ground fruits, although flavor is better if the fruits are stored whole and then ground just before use. Anise is used in French carrot dishes, East Indian curries, Hispanic stews, and Scandinavian breads. It balances the flavors of bay leaf and cinnamon. Anise is also used to flavor liqueurs such as ouzo, anisette, pastis, Pernod, Ricard, anesone, ojen, aguardiente, arrak, kabib, and raki.

    Summary: A teaspoon of freshly ground anise seed brewed into a tea can help relieve congestion from allergies, colds, or flu, and settle upset stomach with gas. Many herbalists note that the herb is also antiseptic, antispasmodic, and soporific and that a few seeds taken with water will often cure hiccups. But the best summary concerning Anise is that it is a great spice to consume for those who have dyspeptic complaints after eating certain dishes. The process of heating anise in baked goods releases compounds that act as very mild stimulants. The anethole released in grinding and baking slows the decay of the baked goods that otherwise might result from fungi or molds. Anise is also used to flavor many herbal other herbal medicines.

    Precautions: Allergies are possible, but rare. The anethole in the essential oil stimulates the release of estrogen in laboratory tests, but is not known to be of significant benefit or detriment to hormonal balance in humans. Not recommended while pregnant or nursing.





    CARAWAY HERBAL PROFILE

    Caraway have warming and aromatic seeds. The caraway plant seeds are used to give a distinctive flavor to rye bread, cabbage, soups, pickles, teas, liqueurs, and spirits. Caraway is said to have been used in Europe longer than any other condiment. A more aromatic and bitter alternative to cumin, caraway is key to Indian, Dutch, German, Russian, and Scandinavian cooking. Although it has an affinity to cooked cabbage and coleslaw, a little ground caraway added at the end of cooking (to avoid bitterness) will add a pleasant and unexpected taste to both sweets and savories.

    Constituents: Caraway's distinct aroma is due to carvones and caveols. The "seed" also contains oil, carbohydrate, antioxidant flavonoids, and protein.

    Parts Used: Each seed is half of a caraway fruit. The dried fruits are used whole or ground in cooking and herbal medicine.

    Typical Preparations: Usually as a tea, but also in infusions, tinctures, encapsulations and as a seasoning.

    Summary: Caraway promotes gastric secretion and stimulates appetite. It breaks down spasms in the gastrointestinal tract to prevent flatulence, but it is also used to treat menstrual cramps and gallbladder spasms. The German E commission reports that caraway seeds are an antimicrobial, and can relieve the feeling of bloating or fullness associated with indigestion and stomach complaints. Caraway oil is strongly fungicidal, having a stronger anti-fungal and anti-yeast activity than the prescription medication Nystatin. Caraway seed oil is used as a flavoring agent in pharmaceuticals, a fragrance in cosmetics and body care products, and is used in all major categories of food, from meat to candy to condiments.

    Precautions: To keep the essential oils at maximum potency, store in a glass container protected from light, moisture, and heat.





    CORIANDER HERBAL PROFILE

    Coriander is the seed of the herb most Americans know as cilantro. It is native to Europe and Western Asia, but it has been naturalized and widely cultivated in North America. References to coriander can be found in Sanskrit writings as far back as 5000 B.C.E., and the seeds were found in Egyptian tombs as far back as the 21st Dynasty. Dioscides believed that ingesting it could heighten a man's sexual potency. In fact, many cultures believed it to be an aphrodisiac, and it was a main component in love potions up through the Renaissance. Coriander seed has been used to settle upset stomach in herbal traditions around the world, it is often combined with cardamom, caraway, fennel, and/or anise. Traditional Chinese medicine used the seeds, usually in the form of a infusion, as an aromatic carminative, and used as decoction and gargle for toothaches. The Chinese thought that anyone who consumes coriander over their lives would be rewarded with immortality. Nowadays, coriander is used as a flavoring agent in pharmaceuticals, alcohol (vermouth, bitters, and gin), frozen dairy deserts, candy, baked goods, gelatins, and various meat products. Medicinally, coriander seed is best suited for relief of tension in the upper abdomen, such as flatulence, cramps, and bloating.

    Cilantro is the leaf of the herb most the world knows as coriander. Its use can be traces back over 5000 years. Hippocrates used it as an aromatic stimulant. The Egyptians used it as a tea for both urinary tract infections and for headaches. The Romans took it to Britain, and the British took it to North America. Spanish conquistadors introduced it to Peru and Mexico, where it spread north to the Americas. Cilantro has been used to settle upset stomach in Latin American herbal healing traditions, much as other traditions use coriander, fennel, or dill. Cilantro is more than just tasty, it's also antimicrobial. The essential oils in cilantro are especially effective against Listeria bacteria, and also slow the growth of E. coli and Salmonella. Combining cilantro with onion or garlic increases its ability to keep food fresh. It is also thought to be an aphrodisiac, and is mentioned as such in Tales of the Arabian Nights over 1000 years ago.

    Constituents: Anethole, camphor, linalool, pinene, quercetin, rutin.

    Parts Used: The dried seed.

    Typical Preparations: Infusion or tincture, and it may be incorporated into food dishes.

    Summary: The Chinese thought that anyone who consumes coriander over their lives would be rewarded with immortality. Nowadays, coriander is used as a flavoring agent in pharmaceuticals, alcohol (vermouth, bitters, and gin), frozen dairy deserts, candy, baked goods, gelatins, and various meat products. Medicinally, coriander seed is best suited for relief of tension in the upper abdomen, such as flatulence, cramps, and bloating.

    Precautions: None.





    fennel


    FENNEL HERBAL PROFILE

    Fennel Seed is also known as Foeniculum vulgare and Anethum Foeniculum, Bari-Sanuf, Bitter Fennel, Carosella, Common Fennel, Fennel Oil, Fennel Seed, Finnochio, Florence Fennel, Foeniculi Antheroleum, Foeniculum Officinale, Foeniculum Capillaceum, Garden Fennel, Large Fennel, Sanuf, Shatapuspha, Sweet Fennel, Wild Fennel.

    Introduction: Fennel's name comes from the Latin foeniculum, meaning "little hay". The Roman historian Pliny recorded that when snakes shed their skins, they ate fennel to restore their sight (although he did not record how he made this observation). Pliny's observation led to the popular use in Europe of a cooled tea of fennel seed which was used as a wash for eyestrain and eye irritations. Chinese and Hindus employed fennel seed as a treatment for snakebite and Medieval Europeans used fennel seed as a treatment for obesity. Several liquors are flavored with fennel, including aquavit, gin, absinthe and fennouillete. All the above-ground parts of the fennel plant are edible. Fennel "seeds" are actually whole fruits, the most aromatic seeds found in the center of the seed head. In seed, a bright green color indicates quality. The herb should be stored in a tightly closed container in a cool, dry place.

    Constituents: The essential oil contains anethole (50 to 80%), limonene (5%), fenchone (5%), estragole (methyl-chavicol), safrole, a-pinene (0.5%), camphene, b-pinene, b-myrcene and p-cymene. The seed also contains fiber and complex carbohydrates.

    Parts Used: The "fruit" or seed dried and used whole or ground.

    Typical Preparations: Used in cooking whole or ground as an excellent spice, also used to make herbal teas and in laxative preparations. Combined with chamomile and/or melissa in teas for colic. Combined with licorice, thyme, and/or poplar buds to treat colds, coughs, and congestion. Combined with chamomile, saffron, anise, fennel, caraway, licorice, and cardamom to treat asthma. For convenience, or if you do not like the flavor, it may be taken as an extract or capsule.

    Summary: Fennel seed is antiseptic and secretolytic, that is, encouraging secretion of saliva and gastric juices. It also stops stomach cramps, often added to laxatives to ensure gentle action. Fennel seed teas break up congestion caused by colds and allergies. There are preliminary studies that suggest that regular consumption of fennel (as well as regular consumption of green beans, mushrooms, oranges, prunes, and celeriac) might slow the progression of osteoporosis. Fennel seed powder has almost exactly the same taste and medicinal effect as whole fennel seed, except it tends to lose anethole. Powdering makes fennel a less estrogenic herb, that is, less likely to stimulate the production of estrogen in women, a characteristic that may be desirable or undesirable depending on the user.

    Precautions: Fennel seed teas are helpful for colicky infants, but fennel seed oil should never be given to infants or young children because of the danger of spasms of the throat.





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    RECOMMENDED HERBAL PRODUCTS

  • Anise Herbal Products
  • Caraway Herbal Products

  • Coriander Herbal Products
  • Fennel Herbal Products






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    AROMATHERAPY: ESSENTIAL OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Allspice Leaf Oil
    Angelica Oil
    Anise Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Basil Oil
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    Yarrow Oil
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    Aromatherapy
    Healing Baths For Colds
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    Using Essential Oils


    AROMATHERAPY: HERBAL & CARRIER OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Almond, Sweet Oil
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  • RELATED MOONDRAGON HEALTH LINKS & INFORMATION

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