animated goddess mdbs banner animated goddess


MoonDragon's Health & Wellness Therapy
Herbal Syrups
COMPOUND SYRUP OF STILLINGIA

(Queen's Root Compound Syrup)


For Informational Use Only
For more detailed information contact your health care provider
about options that may be available for your specific situation.





  • General Instructions - How To Make Herbal Syrups
  • Herbal Syrup Recipes
  • Herbal Descriptions
  • Recommended Herbal Products




  • GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS - HOW TO MAKE HERBAL SYRUPS

    1. Combine approximately 2 ounces of herbs and 1 quart of water. Begin simmering the mixture over low heat and reduce liquid down to 1 pint.

    2. Strain herbs from the liquid by running through a fine mesh sieve, cheesecloth or coffee filter. Pour concentrated liquid back into the simmer pot. Note: Be sure to compost the discarded herbs.

    3. Add 1 cup of Honey (or Maple Syrup, Vegetable Glycerin, Sugar) per pint of liquid.

    4. Warm honey and liquid, on very low heat, just enough to blend together. Note: Cooking honey any longer, or on a high heat, will destroy the healing properties of the honey.

    5. Bottle, label, and refrigerate syrup.





    HERBAL SYRUP RECIPES


    SYRUPUS STILLINGIA - SYRUP OF QUEEN'S ROOT RECIPE #1

    48 troy ounces (about 3.29 lbs or 52.66 oz.) Queen's Root (Stillingia)
    24 troy ounces (about 1.65 lbs or 26.33 oz.) Prickly Ash Berries
    18 pounds (av.) Refined Sugar

    First grind and mix the ingredients together. Place in a percolator, cover with the same menstruum, and macerate for 2 days. Then gradually add diluted alcohol until 2 pints of percolate have been obtained, which retain and set aside. Continue the percolation until the drug is exhausted and distill or evaporate the alcohol from it. Mix the solutions, add 18 pounds (av.) of refined sugar and water enough to make 18 pints of syrup, using a gentle heat to effect solution of the sugar.

    PERCOLATION METHIOD

    This is the procedure used most frequently to extract active ingredients in the preparation of tinctures and fluid extracts. A percolator (a narrow, cone-shaped vessel open at both ends) is generally used. The solid ingredients are moistened with an appropriate amount of the specified menstruum and allowed to stand for approximately 4 hours in a well closed container, after which the mass is packed and the top of the percolator is closed. Additional menstruum is added to form a shallow layer above the mass, and the mixture is allowed to macerate in the closed percolator for 24 hours. The outlet of the percolator then is opened and the liquid contained therein is allowed to drip slowly. Additional menstruum is added as required, until the percolate measures about three-quarters of the required volume of the finished product. The marc is then pressed and the expressed liquid is added to the percolate. Sufficient menstruum is added to produce the required volume, and the mixed liquid is clarified by filtration or by standing followed by decanting.

    COLD BREW MAKERS

  • Cold Brew Coffee & Tea Pitcher, 1.3 Quart
  • Cold Brew Coffee Maker
  • Cold Drip Maker, Curved Brown Wood Frame, Yuma Glass, 6 to 8 cups
  • This coffee maker is gorgeous and would make a lovely addition to your kitchen. Ice and water are placed in the top jar, and by regulating the dripping water through the valve in the center, coffee is steeped and ends up in the carafe at the bottom of the tower. Through a unique 3 hour process using pure ice water, ice drip coffee produces a unique flavor not found in regular brewed coffee. It's easy to use. Just put the water and coffee grounds into the brewer and you are ready to go. A permanent ceramic filter mechanism is included and is available in a brown stain finish. This coffee maker holds 32 oz. By slowly brewing your coffee with ice water, the harsher oils in your ground coffee are not brought out. The final brew is a lot mellower than a regular brew machine.

    A SMALLER VOLUME, NON-PERCOLATION METHOD

    For a smaller volume of syrup, this has recipe has been cut back by a factor of 6 to make only 3 pints of syrup.

    8 ounces Queen's Root (Stillingia)
    4 ounces Prickly Ash Berries
    3 pounds Refined Sugar

    Grind and mix herbs together. Add to a quart sized jar with a tightfitting lid. Add enough 100 proof vodka (50-percent water/50-percent alcohol) to cover herbs. Screw on cap securely. Shake several times daily until vodka has extracted all dissolved soluble plant properties into the solution, making a herbal tincture. Usual recommended time can vary from a few days to 6 weeks, depending on the herb and plant part used. Strain off liquid into a glass bowl using a sieve and coffee filter to remove herbal fragments and debris. Use cheesecloth or several layers of 4x4 gauze pads opened and flattened to squeeze extra liquid from damp herbal solids (called the marc). Put herb solids in the middle of the cheesecloth and gently, firmly squeeze until all liquid has be extracted. Squeeze into glass bowl containing tincture liquid. Mix together. The combined liquids can be clarified by filtration or decantation after standing. Put extracted liquid tincture into enameled pot and add enough water to bring volume up to 6 cups. Add sugar and gently heat to dissolve sugar and simmer until solution thickens into syrup. Alcohol will evaporate from heated solution. Do not boil. Bottle in pint-sized canning jars and secure lids.

    ACTION, MEDICAL USES, & DOSAGE:

    This is one of the most efficient vegetable alterative compounds that can be used. It stimulates normal action of all the excretory organs, improves the appetite, digestion, and assimilation. This has been found highly beneficial in bronchial and laryngeal affections, also in obstinate cases of rheumatism, and wherever a stimulating alterative is required. It may be taken in doses of from a teaspoonful to a tablespoonful, three or four times a day. The suggested dose is from 1 fluid drachm to 1/2 fluid ounce, 3, 4, or 5 times a day, according to the urgency of the symptoms. It should be taken in water.

    Adapted From Henriette's Herbal
    Related Entry: Henriette's Herbal: Stillingia (U. S. P.)- Stillingia



    SYRUP OF QUEEN'S ROOT RECIPE #2

    32 troy ounces (2.19 lbs or 35.11 oz.) Queen's Root (Stillingia)
    32 troy ounces (2.19 lbs or 35.11 oz.) Turkey Corn (Corydalis Tuber; Dicentra Canadensis)
    16 troy ounces (1.1 lbs or 17.55 oz.) Blue Flag Root
    16 troy ounces (1.1 lbs or 17.55 oz.) Elder Flowers
    16 troy ounces (1.1 lbs or 17.55 oz.) Pipsissewa Leaves
    8 troy ounces (0.55 lbs or 8.78 oz.) Coriander
    8 troy ounces (0.55 lbs or 8.78 oz. Prickly Ash Berries


    First grind and mix the articles together, moisten with diluted alcohol and place in a percolator, cover with the same menstruum, and macerate for 2 days. Then gradually add diluted alcohol until 2 pints of percolate have been obtained, which retain and set aside. Continue the percolation until the drug is exhausted and distill or evaporate the alcohol from it. Mix the solutions, add 12 pounds (av.) of refined sugar and water enough to make 16 pints of syrup, using a gentle heat to effect solution of the sugar. Make 32 pints of syrup. This syrup is the old Eclectic preparation that gave the reputation to this compound and served as a basis for the present formula in the U. S. P.

    ACTION, MEDICAL USES, & DOSAGE:

    This is a most powerful and effective alterative, and is extensively used by many practitioners in syphilitic, scrofulous, osseous, mercurial, hepatic, and glandular diseases, or in cases where an alterative is indicated. It is most commonly given with an ounce of iodide of potassium added to each pint of the syrup. The dose is 1 fluid drachm, 3 or 4 times a day, in 1/2 gill of water; but where the iodide is omitted, the dose is from 1 fluid drachm to 1 fluid ounce, 3 or 4 times a day, also in water.



    COMPOUND SYRUP OF STILLINGIA RECIPE #3
    Related Preparation - Syrupus Stillingiae Compositus (N. F.)

    250 ml (8 fl. oz.) Compound Fluid Extract (Tincture) of Stillingia
    15 grams Purified Talcum
    700 grams (1 lb 8 oz.) Sugar
    Add a sufficient quantity of Water to make 1000 ml (33 fl. oz.)

    Mix the compound fluid extract of stillingia with the purified talcum, and afterward with 275 ml (9 fl. oz.) of water, and shake them together thoroughly. Then pour the mixture upon a wetted filter, add the sugar to the filtrate, and pass enough water through the filter to make the product, after the sugar has been dissolved by agitation, measure 1000 ml (33 fl. oz.). Each fluid drachm represents 15 minims of compound fluid extract of Stillingia.





    HERBAL DESCRIPTIONS

    BLUE FLAG HERBAL PROFILE

    Once officially listed in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia, Blue Flag has been used medicinally for centuries to detoxify the body and treat sluggish liver action. Because of this traditional belief in its blood cleansing abilities, it was given the nick name "Liver-Lily". Russian herbalists believed that it was good for chronic skin problems like acne, eczema, and even it could be used as a freckle remover. Taken internally as a tea, it is a strong laxative, diuretic and emetic. Dried root is milder than fresh root, and it is recommended that dried root be used for infusions and teas. Applied topically, it may reduce inflammation, relieve pain and inhibit infection in bruised, swollen or injured joints. Eclectic physicians of the 19th century used it as a non-specific immune enhancer.




    CORIANDER HERBAL PROFILE

    Coriander is the seed of the herb most Americans know as cilantro. It is native to Europe and Western Asia, but it has been naturalized and widely cultivated in North America. References to coriander can be found in Sanskrit writings as far back as 5000 B.C.E., and the seeds were found in Egyptian tombs as far back as the 21st Dynasty. Dioscides believed that ingesting it could heighten a man's sexual potency. In fact, many cultures believed it to be an aphrodisiac, and it was a main component in love potions up through the Renaissance. Coriander seed has been used to settle upset stomach in herbal traditions around the world, it is often combined with cardamom, caraway, fennel, and/or anise. Traditional Chinese medicine used the seeds, usually in the form of a infusion, as an aromatic carminative, and used as decoction and gargle for toothaches. The Chinese thought that anyone who consumes coriander over their lives would be rewarded with immortality. Nowadays, coriander is used as a flavoring agent in pharmaceuticals, alcohol (vermouth, bitters, and gin), frozen dairy deserts, candy, baked goods, gelatins, and various meat products. Medicinally, coriander seed is best suited for relief of tension in the upper abdomen, such as flatulence, cramps, and bloating.

    Cilantro is the leaf of the herb most the world knows as coriander. Its use can be traces back over 5000 years. Hippocrates used it as an aromatic stimulant. The Egyptians used it as a tea for both urinary tract infections and for headaches. The Romans took it to Britain, and the British took it to North America. Spanish conquistadors introduced it to Peru and Mexico, where it spread north to the Americas. Cilantro has been used to settle upset stomach in Latin American herbal healing traditions, much as other traditions use coriander, fennel, or dill. Cilantro is more than just tasty, it's also antimicrobial. The essential oils in cilantro are especially effective against Listeria bacteria, and also slow the growth of E. coli and Salmonella. Combining cilantro with onion or garlic increases its ability to keep food fresh. It is also thought to be an aphrodisiac, and is mentioned as such in Tales of the Arabian Nights over 1000 years ago.





    ELDER HERBAL PROFILE

    The Elder is a member of the honeysuckle family and can grow to a height of 33 feet. Elderberries (called Sambucus nigra) can be very different in form and taste and can grow from bushy shrubs from a few feet high to trees close to 50 feet in height. The elderberry tree has aromatic clusters of star-shaped white flowers that vary from flat-bottomed bunches to globular arrays. The sweet-smelling, spicy but somewhat bitter tasting flowers mature to produce blackish-purple berry-like full fruits with an aromatic, tart taste. The berry colors can range from blue, amber, and red to black and have very different tastes. The black elderberry is used in an extract form. The stalk and branches contain a white, fluffy pulp. Early Native American tribes used nature's way and took the aged hollow stems as arrows or bored holes in them to fashion flutes.

    The European Elder is a plant native to Europe, North Africa and western and central Asia. It thrives throughout lowland forests and along roads and fences and is very often found in farmhouse gardens. Its flowers and berries have a long history of use in traditional European medicine. Elderberries have been used for making preserves, wines, winter cordials, and for adding flavor and color to other wines.

    The flowers and ripe berries are the most common medicinally used parts of the tree. The flowers should be harvested as the plant begins to blossom. Dried fruits are less bitter than fresh. The stems and leaves are poisonous. The black elder flowers contains flavonoids, rutin, mucins and tannins and a large portion of organic acids and calcium. The berries contain fruit acids, vitamins B and C and folic acid, as well as essential oils. Potassium nitrate, sambucin, sambuigrin, sugars. The complex sugars of the berries are the immune-active fraction.





    PIPSISSEWA HERBAL PROFILE

    Pipsissewa is a small, perennial evergreen native to much of southern Canada and the northern United States. Pipsissewa was used by native peoples to treat urinary tract infections, as well as to reduce sweating and treat fever. Its scientific name literally means "winter loving," but its leaves are collected in late summer for medicinal use. The leaves have very little scent until they are rubbed to release a pleasant but mildly "puckery" odor. It is currently used as a flavoring in root beer production, and in candy.




    PRICKLY ASH HERBAL PROFILE

    Prickly Ash can be taken internally or used externally. It relieves chronic pain. Usually a prickly ash poultice applied to the skin over the area of pain is more effective than a prickly ash tincture or tea taken by mouth. Test the herb on a small area of skin first to make sure you are not among the very few people sensitive or allergic to the herb. About 1350, a book entitled the Ri Yong Ben Cao (Home Guide to Useful Medicines) first advised Chinese physicians of the medicinal benefits of prickly ash, also known as Szechuan pepper. Before prickly ash was used medicinally, however, it was applied in the Imperial Court as the sole anesthetic for the operation by which the Emperor acquired his court eunuchs. Traditional Chinese Medicine uses prickly ash to warm the "middle burner," the energies in the middle of the body that power the immune response and help digest food.

    Traditional herbal medicine also uses prickly ash to kill parasites and to alleviate abdominal pain, particularly when the source of the pain is a parasitic infection. Teas or tinctures. Prickly ash powder may be used as a poultice applied to the abdomen to treat abdominal pain (recommended over teas or tinctures for this purpose). Although rare, may also be taken as capsule.

    Chopped prickly ash bark can be used to make teas or tinctures when combined with Ginger and/or Panax ginseng for relieving chronic abdominal pain. Ginger to treat nausea and vomiting in long-term illnesses. Mume fruit and Coptis or Oregon Grape root for treating symptoms caused by roundworms (usually vomiting). The seed or "eyes" of Prickly Ash are used in teas as an acrid, bitter, and cooling treatment for wheezing or swelling.

    Precautions: Always seek a medical diagnosis when there is acute abdominal pain. Traditional Chinese Medicine teaches that prickly ash should be avoided when there is fever with profuse sweating, and used with caution during pregnancy. Prickly ash can stop lactation, and should be avoided by mothers wishing to continue nursing. Products made from the American prickly ash (Zanthoxylum americanum) can cause sunlight sensitivity. This effect is likely to be a problem only if the user (1) takes prescription ACE inhibitors for high blood pressure or (2) eats large amounts of celery or celeriac or takes St. John's wort. Sunburn can be avoided by avoidance of midday sun or by use of sun block.





    STILLINGIA HERBAL PROFILE

    Stillingia, in large doses is an emetic and purgative causing a disagreeable, peculiar, burning sensation in the stomach or alimentary canal with considerable prostration of the system; in smaller doses it is an excellent alterative, and influences the secretory functions; it has almost a specific action in the different forms of primary and secondary syphilis, also in skin diseases, scrofula and hepatic affections, acting with most successful results. The fluid extract combined with oils of anise or caraway, proves very beneficial in chronic bronchitis and laryngitis. Some pieces of fresh root chewed daily have permanently and effectually cured these troubles, it is also useful for leucorrhea.





    MoonDragon's Health & Wellness Therapy: Herbal Syrups Index
    MoonDragon's Nutrition Therapy Index


    QUALITY SUPPLIES & PRODUCTS


    FTC Advertising & Affilate Disclosure: This website has an affiliate relationship with certain merchants selling products and we recieve commissions from those sales to help support this website. Any products listed here are not listed by any rating system. We do not rate any product or post any feedback about products listed here. We leave this to the individual merchants to provide. We do not provide product prices or shopping carts since you do not order these products directly from us, but from the merchant providing the products. We only provide the link to that merchant webpage with all related product information and pricing. The products are listed here by merchant, product use, quantity size or volume, and for nutritional supplements - dosage per unit. All product descriptions are provided by the merchant or manufacturer and are not our descriptive review of the product. We do not endorse any specific product or attest to its effectiveness to treat any health condition or support nutritional requirements for any individual.

    RECOMMENDED HERBAL PRODUCTS

  • Blue Flag Herbal Products
  • Coriander Herbal Products
  • Elder Herbal Products
  • Ginger Herbal Products

  • Pipsissewa Herbal Products
  • Prickly Ash Herbal Products
  • Purified Talk Products
  • Stillingia Herbal Products






  • PURIFIED TALC PRODUCTS

    Magnesium silicate (MgSiO3) when hydrated is most commonly known as "Talc". In the pharmaceutical industry it is used as an anticaking agent to improve powder flow in tablet compression. Talc is used cosmetically in talcum and baby powder as an adsorbent. Talc has been reported to be used in some food products, and is generally recognized as safe by the FDA. Natural talc contains asbestos, a substance that may lead to lung cancer. However, talcum products used in cosmetics have been free of asbestos since the 1970s. Some studies have reported small increases in ovarian cancer with the use of asbestos-free talcum powder, but studies are conflicting and the results are not definitive. The American Cancer Society suggests corn starch-based cosmetics might be an alternative in those concerned about talc use.

    Amazon: Chinese Talcum Powder, 250 grams
    Amazon: Huashi Hua Shi Talcum (Talc), Tong Ren Tang, 100 grams
    Produced from Anhui, China and manufactured by Beijing Tongrentang Bozhou Chinese Medicine Co. Ltd. Talc is a silicate mineral containing mainly hydrated magnesium silicate [Mg3(Si4O)(OH)2]. It is collected and removed from sand and foreign matter. It is sold as a dietary ingredient.
    Amazon: Talc (USP Grade), Making Cosmetics Inc, 4.4 oz. (125 grams)
    Hydrous natural mineral consisting of silicon, oxygen and magnesium (synonyms: magnesium silicate hydroxide, French chalk, soap-stone, steatite). USP-grade purified to remove other metals as impurities. Fine white and soft powder, faint earthy odor. Particle size 40 to 50 micrometer. Insoluble (but well miscible) in water, alcohols and oils. CAS # is 14807-96-6. INCI Name is Talcum. Properties include filling agent (provides stability and texture), non-gelling thickener, film forming agent (adheres to the skin and repels water), stabilizer of fragrances. It is used to add as is to formulas (note: incompatible with quaternary ammonium compounds like conditioning surfactants). For external use only. Applications include makeup products (e.g. foundations, face powders, lipsticks, eye shadows, mascara, etc.), soaps, antiperspirants, ointments, shaving creams.
    Amazon: Talc, Making Cosmetics Inc, 17.6 oz. (500 grams)
    Hydrous natural mineral consisting of silicon, oxygen and magnesium (synonyms: magnesium silicate hydroxide, French chalk, soap-stone, steatite). USP-grade purified to remove other metals as impurities. Fine white and soft powder, faint earthy odor. Particle size 40 to 50 micrometer. Insoluble (but well miscible) in water, alcohols and oils. CAS # is 14807-96-6. INCI Name is Talcum. Properties include filling agent (provides stability and texture), non-gelling thickener, film forming agent (adheres to the skin and repels water), stabilizer of fragrances. It is used to add as is to formulas (note: incompatible with quaternary ammonium compounds like conditioning surfactants). For external use only. Applications include makeup products (e.g. foundations, face powders, lipsticks, eye shadows, mascara, etc.), soaps, antiperspirants, ointments, shaving creams.
    Amazon: Hydrous Magnesium Silicate Talc Powder, Lab Grade Reagent, OnlineScienceMall, 30 grams
    Also known as Talcum powder or Hydrous Magnesium Silicate, it has a chemical formula of Mg3Si4O10(OH)2.. This lab grade reagent has a molecular weight of 379.27g/mol, and a CAS reference number of 14807-96-6. This chemical is for laboratory use only, and is not intended for food, drug, or cosmetic Use. It should be kept out of the reach of children. Each bottle of our reagents come standard with an SDS sheet (an updated version of the discontinued MSDS sheet).
    Amazon: Hydrous Magnesium Silicate Talc Powder, Lab Grade Reagent, OnlineScienceMall, 500 gramsAlso known as Talcum powder or Hydrous Magnesium Silicate, it has a chemical formula of Mg3Si4O10(OH)2.. This lab grade reagent has a molecular weight of 379.27g/mol, and a CAS reference number of 14807-96-6. This chemical is for laboratory use only, and is not intended for food, drug, or cosmetic Use. It should be kept out of the reach of children. Each bottle of our reagents come standard with an SDS sheet (an updated version of the discontinued MSDS sheet).








    MoonDragon's Womens Health Index

    | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |






    Health & Wellness Index





    AROMATHERAPY: ESSENTIAL OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Allspice Leaf Oil
    Angelica Oil
    Anise Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Basil Oil
    Bay Laurel Oil
    Bay Oil
    Benzoin Oil
    Bergamot Oil
    Black Pepper Oil
    Chamomile (German) Oil
    Cajuput Oil
    Calamus Oil
    Camphor (White) Oil
    Caraway Oil
    Cardamom Oil
    Carrot Seed Oil
    Catnip Oil
    Cedarwood Oil
    Chamomile Oil
    Cinnamon Oil
    Citronella Oil
    Clary-Sage Oil
    Clove Oil
    Coriander Oil
    Cypress Oil
    Dill Oil
    Eucalyptus Oil
    Fennel Oil
    Fir Needle Oil
    Frankincense Oil
    Geranium Oil
    German Chamomile Oil
    Ginger Oil
    Grapefruit Oil
    Helichrysum Oil
    Hyssop Oil
    Iris-Root Oil
    Jasmine Oil
    Juniper Oil
    Labdanum Oil
    Lavender Oil
    Lemon-Balm Oil
    Lemongrass Oil
    Lemon Oil
    Lime Oil
    Longleaf-Pine Oil
    Mandarin Oil
    Marjoram Oil
    Mimosa Oil
    Myrrh Oil
    Myrtle Oil
    Neroli Oil
    Niaouli Oil
    Nutmeg Oil
    Orange Oil
    Oregano Oil
    Palmarosa Oil
    Patchouli Oil
    Peppermint Oil
    Peru-Balsam Oil
    Petitgrain Oil
    Pine-Long Leaf Oil
    Pine-Needle Oil
    Pine-Swiss Oil
    Rosemary Oil
    Rose Oil
    Rosewood Oil
    Sage Oil
    Sandalwood Oil
    Savory Oil
    Spearmint Oil
    Spikenard Oil
    Swiss-Pine Oil
    Tangerine Oil
    Tea-Tree Oil
    Thyme Oil
    Vanilla Oil
    Verbena Oil
    Vetiver Oil
    Violet Oil
    White-Camphor Oil
    Yarrow Oil
    Ylang-Ylang Oil
    Aromatherapy
    Healing Baths For Colds
    Aromatherapy
    Herbal Cleansers
    Using Essential Oils


    AROMATHERAPY: HERBAL & CARRIER OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Almond, Sweet Oil
    Apricot Kernel Oil
    Argan Oil
    Arnica Oil
    Avocado Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Black Cumin Oil
    Black Currant Oil
    Black Seed Oil
    Borage Seed Oil
    Calendula Oil
    Camelina Oil
    Castor Oil
    Coconut Oil
    Comfrey Oil
    Evening Primrose Oil
    Flaxseed Oil
    Grapeseed Oil
    Hazelnut Oil
    Hemp Seed Oil
    Jojoba Oil
    Kukui Nut Oil
    Macadamia Nut Oil
    Meadowfoam Seed Oil
    Mullein Oil
    Neem Oil
    Olive Oil
    Palm Oil
    Plantain Oil
    Plum Kernel Oil
    Poke Root Oil
    Pomegranate Seed Oil
    Pumpkin Seed Oil
    Rosehip Seed Oil
    Safflower Oil
    Sea Buckthorn Oil
    Sesame Seed Oil
    Shea Nut Oil
    Soybean Oil
    St. Johns Wort Oil
    Sunflower Oil
    Tamanu Oil
    Vitamin E Oil
    Wheat Germ Oil





    HELPFUL RELATED MOONDRAGON NUTRITION BASICS LINKS

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Amino Acids Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Antioxidants Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Enzymes Information
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Herbs Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Homeopathics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Hydrosols Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Minerals Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Mineral Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary & Cosmetic Supplements Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary Supplements Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Specialty Supplements
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Introduction


  • NUTRITION BASICS ARTICLES

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: 4 Basic Nutrients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Foods That Contain Additives & Artificial Ingredients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Is Aspartame A Safe Sugar Substitute?
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Guidelines For Selecting & Preparing Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Destroy
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Heal
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: The Micronutrients: Vitamins & Minerals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Overcooking Your Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Phytochemicals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Increase Your Consumption of Raw Produce
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Limit Your Use of Salt
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Use Proper Cooking Utensils
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Choosing The Best Water & Types of Water





  • RELATED MOONDRAGON HEALTH LINKS & INFORMATION

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Analysis Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Diet Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Recipe Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Therapy: Preparing Produce for Juicing
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Additives Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Safety Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Articles
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Back Pain
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Labor & Birth
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Blending Chart
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Essential Oil Details
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Miscarriage
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Post Partum
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Childbearing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Problems in Pregnancy & Birthing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #1
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #2
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Tips
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Uses
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Information Overview
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Touch & Movement Therapies Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy: Touch & Movement: Aromatherapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Therapy: Touch & Movement - Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Therapeutic Massage
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 1
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 2
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Hydrotherapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Pain Control Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Relaxation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Steam Inhalation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy - Herbal Oils Index







  • For a full list of available products from Mountain Rose Herbs, click on banner below:






    Starwest Botanicals




    HerbsPro Supplement Store


    HerbsPro




    Up to 70% Off Bath & Beauty - evitamins


    eVitamins








    Kalyx.com Herbs, Foods, Supplements, Bath & Body


    Chinese Herbs Direct


    Ayurvedic Herbs Direct


    Pet Herbs Direct


    TakeHerb.com


    Wild Divine - Stress relief training software and meditation.


    Aleva Health - Hosiery, Orthopedics, Wound Care, Support, Diabetic Socks


    ShareASale Merchant-Affiliate Program








    MOONDRAGON'S REALM - WEBSITE DIRECTORY


    A website map to help you find what you are looking for on MoonDragon.org's Website. Available pages have been listed under appropriate directory headings.




    Top