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MoonDragon's Health & Wellness
Nutrition Basics

Vitamins
VITAMIN C

(Ascorbic Acid)


"For Informational Use Only"
For more detailed information contact your health care provider
about options that may be available for your specific situation.





  • Vitamin C Description & Overview
  • Vitamin C Health Benefits
  • Vitamin C Uses & Scientific Evidence
  • Vitamin C Dietary Sources
  • Vitamin C Dosage Information
  • Vitamin C Safety, Cautions & Interactions
  • Vitamin C Supplement Products




  • vitamin C


    VITAMIN C DESCRIPTION & OVERVIEW

    Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, is an important nutrient necessary for human life. Vitamin C is an antioxidant that is required for the production of collagen, tissue growth and repair, adrenal gland function, and healthy gums. There are several different types of collagen that serve a variety of functions in our bodies. Some of those types are found in the connective tissue of skin, bone, teeth, tendons, ligaments, fascia, organ capsules, liver, spleen, kidneys, and cartilage. Vitamin C is also important in protecting the fat-soluble vitamins A and E as well as fatty acids from oxidation, and it stimulates the immune system. It also aids in the production of anti-stress hormones and interferon, and is needed for the metabolism of folic acid, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. It protects against the harmful effects of pollution, helps to prevent cancer, protects against infection, and enhances immunity. Vitamin C increases the absorption of iron. It also may reduce the cholesterol levels and high blood pressure, and prevent atherosclerosis. Essential in the formation of collagen, Vitamin C protects against blood clotting and bruising, and promotes the healing of wounds and burns.

    New evidence indicates that Vitamin Cworks synergistically with Vitamin E - that is, when these vitamins work together, they have a greater effect than when they work separately. Vitamin E scavenges for dangerous free radicals in cell membranes, while Vitamin C attacks free radicals in biologic fluids. These vitamins reinforce and extend each other's antioxidant activity.

    Because the body cannot manufacture Vitamin C, it must be obtained through the diet or in the form of supplements. Unfortunately, most of the Vitamin C consumed in the diet is lost in the urine. When larger amounts of Vitamin C are required due to serious illness, such as cancer, it is more effective to take Vitamin C intravenously, under the advisement and supervision of a health care provider, than it is to take high doses orally.

    In addition to collagen production, Vitamin C prevents and cures the disease scurvy, which is rare, except in alcoholics who receive their entire calorie intake from alcohol. It is also beneficial in the treatment of Iron Deficiency Anemia. Some people claim regular use has limited the number of colds they get.

    Scurvy is a disease caused by vitamin C deficiency. It is characterized by poor wound healing, soft and spongy bleeding gums, edema, extreme weakness, and "pinpoint" hemorrhages under the skin. Fortunately, this condition is rare in Western societies. More common are signs of lesser degrees of deficiency, including gums that bleed when brushed; increased susceptibility to infection, especially colds and bronchial infections; joint pains; lack of energy; poor digestion; prolonged healing time; a tendency to bruise easily; and tooth loss.





    VITAMIN C HEALTH BENEFITS

    Vitamin C is perhaps best known for its ability to strengthen the immune system. But this potent nutrient also has many other important roles that control significant aspects of our health. When we get enough in our diets, vitamin C helps detoxify our bodies, promotes healing of all of our cells, and allows us to better deal with stress. It also supports the good bacteria in our gut, destroys detrimental bacteria and viruses, neutralizes harmful free radicals, removes heavy metals, protects us from pollution, and much more. Unfortunately, most Americans are not getting anywhere near enough of this vitamin to experience these health benefits. That is especially true for our children. One reason why we fall so short is that our diet simply does not consist of nearly enough raw fruits and vegetables. Another reason is that the RDA of 90 mg for vitamin C is set much too low, which is the same problem we see with vitamin D. Such a low RDA leads people into a false sense of security that they are meeting their daily requirements. It also makes them wary of taking the much higher dosages that are required for good health. So the question becomes just how much vitamin C does a human need? A good starting point is to look at animals that are able to synthesize their own vitamin C.

    All animals except humans, primates, guinea pigs, and a handful of other species are able to make their own vitamin C. We know that the vast majority of animals make approximately 30 mg per kg of body weight. That works out to be about 2 grams (2000 mg) of vitamin C for a 150 pound person. We also know that when animals are under stress, injured, or sick, they can make up to ten times more vitamin C than their normal daily requirements. Since humans are unable to make vitamin C, we must get it from our diets. When the differences in body weights are equalized, primates and guinea pigs consume 20 to 80 times the RDA suggested amount. The great apes, our closest living relatives, require anywhere from 2 to 6 grams (2,000 to 6,000 mg) of Vitamin C per day under normal healthy conditions. How much we humans need can be a bit more complicated, as it depends on many variables such as diet, age, stress level, amount of exposure to pollutants, amount of medications we take, and overall health. A generic amount is around 1 to 4 grams (1,000 to 4,000 mg) per day for a healthy individual. People with serious illnesses will need much, much more.

    Vitamin C is the most popular single vitamin. Besides taking it to treat colds, people take vitamin C hoping that it will cure numerous ailments. There is now scientific evidence to support some of that hope. Scientifically controlled studies using vitamin C for colds show that it can reduce the severity of cold symptoms, acting as a natural antihistamine. The vitamin may be useful for allergy control for the same reason: It may reduce histamine levels. By giving the immune system one of the important nutrients it needs, extra vitamin C can often shorten the duration of the cold as well. However, studies have been unable to prove that megadoses of the vitamin can actually prevent the common cold.

    As an important factor in collagen production, vitamin C is useful in wound healing of all types. From cuts and broken bones to burns and recovery from surgical wounds, vitamin C taken orally helps wounds to heal faster and better. Applied topically, vitamin C may protect the skin from free radical damage after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays.

    Vitamin C makes the headlines when it comes to cancer prevention. Its antioxidant properties protect cells and their DNA from damage and mutation. It supports the body's immune system, the first line of defense against cancer, and prevents certain cancer-causing compounds from forming in the body. Vitamin C reduces the risk of getting almost all types of cancer. It appears that this nutrient doesn't directly attack cancer that has already occurred, but it helps keep the immune system nourished, enabling it to battle the cancer.

    As an antioxidant, vitamin C helps to prevent cataracts - the clouding of the lens of the eye that can lead to blindness in older adults. The lens needs a lot of vitamin C to counteract all the free radicals that form as a result of sunlight on the eye. Vitamin C is concentrated in the lens. When there is plenty of this vitamin floating through your system, it is easy for the body to pull it out of your blood and put it into the lens, protecting it from damage. It is possible that 1,000 mg per day of vitamin C might stop cataracts in their tracks and possibly improve vision.

    As with the other antioxidants, vitamin C helps to prevent heart disease by preventing free radicals from damaging artery walls, which could lead to plaque formation. This nutrient also keeps cholesterol in the bloodstream from oxidizing, another early step in the progression towards heart disease and stroke. Vitamin C may help people who have marginal vitamin C status to obtain favorable blood cholesterol levels. High blood pressure may also improve in the presence of this wonder vitamin. All these factors combined make vitamin C an inexpensive and easy way to lower one's risk of heart disease and strokes.

    Asthmatics tend to have higher needs for vitamin C because of its antioxidant function in the lungs and airways. Doses of 1,000 to 2,000 mg per day improve asthmatic symptoms and lessen the body's production of histamine, which contributes to inflammation.

    People with diabetes can benefit from extra vitamin C, too. This nutrient can help regulate blood sugar levels. Since insulin helps vitamin C, as well as glucose, get into cells, people with diabetes may not have enough vitamin C inside many of their cells. Just like glucose, vitamin C cannot do its work if it is not inside of a cell. Supplementing vitamin C can force it into body cells, where it can protect against the many complications of diabetes.

    A dose of 1,000 to 3,000 mg per day drives down glycosylated hemoglobin levels. This means that glucose molecules do not attach to blood cells. Glucose adhering to red blood cells is responsible for many diabetic complications such as poor wound healing, problems with capillaries, and sluggish circulation.





    vitamin C structure


    VITAMIN C USES & SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE

    Vitamin C, also known as Ascorbic acid and Dehydroascorbic acid, is a water-soluble vitamin that is necessary for normal growth and development. Water-soluble vitamins dissolve in water. Leftover amounts of the vitamin leave the body through the urine. That means you need a continuous supply of such vitamins in your diet.

  • Vitamin C is needed for the growth and repair of tissues in all parts of your body. It is used to form an important protein used to make skin, tendons, ligaments, and blood vessels. Heal wounds and form scar tissue. Repair and maintain cartilage, bones, and teeth.

  • Vitamin C is one of many antioxidants. Antioxidants are nutrients that block some of the damage caused by free radicals. Free radicals are made when your body breaks down food or when you are exposed to tobacco smoke or radiation. The buildup of free radicals over time is largely responsible for the aging process. Free radicals may play a role in cancer, heart disease, and conditions like arthritis.

  • For many years, vitamin C has been a popular remedy for the common cold. Research shows that for most people, vitamin C supplements or vitamin C-rich foods do not reduce the risk of getting the common cold. However, people who take vitamin C supplements regularly might have slightly shorter colds or somewhat milder symptoms. Taking a vitamin C supplement after a cold starts does not appear to be helpful.


  • NEWLY DISCOVERED HEALTH BENEFITS OF VITAMIN C

    By Julius Goepp, MD
    LE Magazine April 2008


    Vitamin C is rapidly finding new applications in protecting against endothelial dysfunction, high blood pressure, and the blood vessel changes that precede heart disease. Additional research is discovering that vitamin C can be helpful in preventing asthma, protecting against cancer, and supporting healthy blood sugar levels in diabetics. While often taken for granted, vitamin C is a critical supplement in your program to improve cardiac health and avoid degenerative diseases.

    VITAMIN C - BREAKTHROUGHS IN CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH

    One of the most intensely studied areas of vitamin C benefits is in the area of cardiovascular health. Researchers are finding that vitamin C impacts several aspects of cardiac health, ranging from blood pressure to endothelial health. Perhaps itís not surprising that as the relationship between oxidative damage, inflammation, and atherosclerosis becomes increasingly investigated by science, vitamin C is seen as a key protective element against many aspects of cardiovascular disease.

    For years, scientists have warned us against the dangerous buildup of plaque that can lead to a heart attack or stroke. Researchers are investigating the possibilities that vitamin C may play a role in reducing our risk of plaque buildup. In the early stages of atherosclerosis, white blood cells called monocytes migrate and stick to the walls of the endothelium. Once this process begins, our vessel walls begin to thicken and lose their elasticity, which paves the way for atherosclerosis. Interestingly, British researchers studied the effects of vitamin C supplementation (250 mg/day) on this adhesion process in 40 healthy adults. Before the study, subjects with low pre-supplementation levels of vitamin C had 30 percent greater monocyte adhesion than normal, putting them at higher risk for atherosclerosis. Impressively, after six weeks of supplementation, the rate of this dangerous monocyte adhesion actually fell by 37 percent. The researchers went on to demonstrate that the same small dose of vitamin C was able to normalize a molecule that white blood cells use to adhere to the endothelium. The findings indicated that through supplementation with vitamin C, scientists were able to regulate how specific genes produce vital proteins, thereby reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease at the molecular level.

    Building on this important work, scientific researchers in 2005 studied the impact of antioxidant supplementation on degenerative aortic stenosis, an age-associated heart valve disorder that has an inflammatory component. The scientists studied 100 patients with mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis, randomly assigning 41 of them to receive vitamins C (1,000 mg/day) and E (400 IU/day), 39 to receive vitamin C only (1,000 mg/day), and 20 to serve as untreated controls. Both supplemented groups experienced significant reductions in levels of several important adhesion molecules, potentially reducing further inflammatory damage to the heart valves. And just as vitamin C helps preserve vascular integrity, it is also proving beneficial in combating other risk factors for endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease.

    WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: VITAMIN C

  • Ascorbic acid, or vitamin C, is a potent antioxidant with increasingly diverse uses in health promotion and disease prevention.
  • Every step in the progression of atherosclerosis can benefit from the antioxidant power of vitamin C, from preventing endothelial dysfunction and altering lipid profiles and coagulation factors to preventing blood vessel changes that can lead to strokes and other vascular catastrophes.
  • Vitamin C supplements reduce cellular DNA damage that is the vital first step in cancer initiation and also reduce the inflammatory changes that allow a malignant cell to grow into a dangerous tumor.
  • Vitamin C supplements enhance the health-promoting effects of exercise and reduce exercise-induced oxidative damage.
  • Vitamin C supplements also dramatically combat the oxidative damage caused by smoking and exposure to tobacco smoke.
  • In respiratory conditions, vitamin C supplements help avert or shorten the duration of common colds and may mitigate the risk of serious respiratory conditions like asthma.
  • Vitamin C supplements can speed the clearance of the stomach disease-causing bacterium Helicobacter pylori and cut the risk of gastric cancer it causes.


  • LIPID PROFILES, BLOOD PRESSURE & BODY MASS INDEX

    Most people have learned to pay attention to the amount and kinds of fats and cholesterol in their blood (lipid profiles), their blood pressure, and their body mass index (BMI), the most meaningful measure of how weight and health are related. This group of parameters not only influences endothelial function but is instrumental in laying down atherosclerotic plaque, helping set the stage for atherosclerosis. Data from just the past few years reveal that vitamin C plays an important role in helping to prevent such a scenario.

    In 2000, British researchers reported a six-month, double-blind study of vitamin C 500 mg/day versus placebo in 40 men and women, aged 60 to 80 years. The study was a "crossover" design in which subjects took the assigned pills for three months, stopped them for one week, and then reversed their assignments for another three months; this is a particularly strong study design because it helps to eliminate individual differences. The results were impressive. Daytime systolic blood pressure dropped by an average of 2 mm Hg, with the greatest drop seen in subjects who had the highest initial pressures. Women in the study also had a modest increase in their beneficial high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels. The authors concluded that these effects might "contribute to the reported association between higher vitamin C intake and lower risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke."

    Researchers in South Carolina conducted a 2002 study of 31 patients with a mean age of 62 years, who were randomly assigned to take 500, 1,000, or 2,000 mg of vitamin C daily for eight months. This research group actually found a drop in both systolic (4.5 mm Hg) and diastolic (2.8 mm Hg) blood pressure over the course of supplementation, although there was no change in blood lipid levels. Interestingly, this study found no differences between the groups taking the various doses, though the number of subjects was small and a larger study might have demonstrated important dose-related differences.

    Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference correlate well with risk for cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. A landmark 2007 study from nutritionists at the University of Arizona explored the relationships between vitamin C levels, body mass index, and waist circumference. In 118 sedentary, non-smoking adults, 54 percent of whom were classified as obese and 24 percent overweight by BMI standards, lower vitamin C levels were significantly correlated with higher BMI, percentage of body fat, and waist circumference. Women with higher vitamin C levels also had higher levels of the fat-suppressing hormone, adiponectin. This remarkable study demonstrated a vital relationship between vitamin C levels and obesity-related risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

    VASCULAR STIFFNESS & COAGULATION

    The development of atherosclerosis involves dysfunction of the vascular endothelium. As plaque accumulates and as vessel walls thicken, blood vessels become increasingly stiff, making them less able to participate in blood pressure control and to deliver appropriate amounts of blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction increases the tendency for arterial blockage due to a blood clot, or thrombosis. Like several other "atherogenic" changes, these effects are related to the impact of free-radical damage. Vitamin Cís antioxidant characteristics are showing great power in reducing or even reversing some of these ominous vascular changes.

    Medical researchers explored the impact of vitamin C supplements on both arterial stiffness and platelet aggregation (an important early step in clot formation). They provided vitamin C in a single 2,000 mg oral dose, or placebo, to healthy male volunteers. Just six hours after supplementation, measures of arterial stiffness decreased by 10 percent in the supplemented group, and platelet aggregation (as stimulated chemically) by 35 percent, with no changes at all seen in the placebo group. As the authors point out, this impressive impact of vitamin C even in healthy subjects may imply an even greater effect in patients with atherosclerosis or cardiovascular risk factors, and that "vitamin C supplementation might prove an effective therapy in cardiovascular disease."

    Many other studies have further advanced our understanding of how vitamin C might reduce atherosclerosis risk factors. Finnish researchers studied 440 adults aged 45 to 69 years with elevated total serum cholesterol. Subjects took daily doses of just 500 mg slow-release vitamin C and 272 IU vitamin E and were followed for six years for evidence of progression of atherosclerotic changes in blood vessels. The chief study outcome was the intima-media thickness, or IMT (an indicator of stroke risk) of the carotid arteries, which supply blood to the brain. Supplementation with vitamins C and E significantly decreased the rate of IMT increase over the six-year period by 26 percent. Importantly, this effect was even larger in people with low baseline vitamin C levels and those with pre-existing plaques in their coronary arteries. In other words, supplementation seemed to provide the greatest benefit to those with the greatest need. This study shows that supplementation with vitamin C slows down the progression of stroke-inducing atherosclerosis.

    MAXIMIZING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE CHOICES

    In our efforts to reduce the risk of heart disease, regular exercise plays an important part in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The increased delivery of oxygen-rich blood to tissues is a vital part of the process - but it can also produce destructive free radicals. Clearly, the solution is not to stop exercising! Rather, a series of recent studies shows how supplementation with vitamin C can mitigate free-radical damage from intense exercise.

    British researchers evaluated the effects of just two weeks of modest vitamin C supplementation (200 mg twice daily) on the recovery from an unaccustomed bout of exercise. Eight healthy men were given either a placebo or vitamin C supplementation each day, and after 14 days performed a 90-minute-long running test. The supplemented group had less muscle soreness, better muscle function, and lower blood levels of the oxidative stress-induced molecule malondialdehyde. And although both groups experienced post-exercise elevations in levels of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6, increases in the supplemented group were smaller than in the placebo recipients. The scientists concluded that "prolonged vitamin C supplementation has some modest beneficial effects on recovery from unaccustomed exercise." Timing is critical, however. When the researchers repeated their study with subjects who took vitamin C only after exercise, no benefit was seen.

    Oxidative stress during exercise induces significant changes in proteins, producing compounds known as protein carbonyls. Measuring levels of protein carbonyls is therefore a useful indicator of oxidation. Exercise scientists at the University of North Carolina studied the impact of vitamin C supplementation (500 or 1,000 mg/day for two weeks) compared with placebo on oxidative stress indicators in 12 healthy men. As expected, exercise acutely reduced total blood levels of antioxidants in both groups. Levels of protein carbonyls increased by nearly four-fold in the placebo group, while vitamin C recipients experienced little or no elevation. This vital study demonstrates that vitamin C can protect against exercise-induced protein oxidation in a dose-dependent fashion.

    Muscle soreness after exercising can be a big disincentive to continue on a healthy fitness program. That is why the subsequent findings of that UNC group are so important. The scientists gave vitamin C supplements (3,000 mg/day) or placebo to a group of 18 healthy men for two weeks before and four days after performing 70 repetitions of an elbow extension exercise. Not surprisingly, considerable muscle soreness ensued, but it was significantly reduced in the supplemented group. The release of creatine kinase, an indicator of muscle damage, was also attenuated with vitamin C, compared with the placebo group. Blood levels of natural antioxidants fell significantly in placebo subjects, while vitamin C supplementation completely prevented this change. Results such as these suggest that the supplemented group would be much more enthusiastic about exercising the next day!

    MINIMIZING UNHEALTHY LIFESTYLE CHOICES

    Vitamin C may offer important protective benefits for smokers and those who are passively exposed to tobacco smoke. Smoking has been linked with elevated levels of C-reactive (CRP) protein, an inflammatory marker linked with an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. As Life Extension readers know, it is crucial to monitor your CRP levels through regular blood testing and to keep your CRP under control in order to limit cardiovascular problems. Fortunately, vitamin C has been shown to play a role in helping to combat excessive CRP levels.

    Researchers in Berkeley evaluated the impact of antioxidant supplementation on blood levels of CRP in both active and passive smokers.24 They studied 160 healthy adults who were actively or passively exposed to cigarette smoke and randomly assigned to receive placebo, vitamin C (515 mg/day), or an antioxidant mixture (including vitamins C, E, and lipoic acid). Subjects in the vitamin C group underwent a significant 24 percent reduction in their plasma CRP concentrations, while neither of the other groups showed a significant change. This remarkable result provides strong support for chronic supplementation with vitamin C, whether or not you smoke.

    Smoking causes cancer in part by directly damaging DNA, which is a vital first step in the onset of cancer. In studying the effect of vitamin C supplements on reducing DNA damage in blood cells, Danish researchers gave relatively low doses (500 mg/day) of vitamin C as plain-release or slow-release tablets combined with vitamin E (182 mg/day), or placebo, for four weeks to a group of male smokers. The slow-release formulation of vitamin C reduced the number of DNA damage sites measured in white blood cells just four and eight hours after a single tablet, a positive result that was still evident at four weeks. The plain-release tablets also exerted a protective effect at four hours, suggesting benefits of long-term vitamin C supplementation in minimizing DNA damage.

    Once DNA is damaged, however, smoking induces pro-inflammatory changes that can allow a malignant cell to become a dangerous tumor as well as causing blood vessel damage associated with atherosclerosis. Vitamin C supplementation is a logical approach to reducing the impact of these inflammatory changes, as was shown recently by a British investigative team. They studied 10 smokers with the high-risk lipoprotein ApoE4 gene as well as 11 non-smokers, all of whom took just 60 mg/day of vitamin C for four weeks. Remarkably, these high-risk smokers on this low-dose regimen responded with a marked reduction in levels of a host of pro-inflammatory cytokines. As the authors themselves pointed out, this study identified core molecular mechanisms that help explain the known benefits of vitamin C supplementation in smokers.

    Literally scores of other studies have been published demonstrating the benefits of vitamin C supplements in smokers and those passively exposed to cigarette smoke. One study found that 500 mg of vitamin C twice daily for just two weeks reduced the depletion of vitamin E caused by smoking by up to 50 percent.

    Two other studies investigating low and high doses of vitamin C supplementation revealed its benefits in improving endothelial function, a cornerstone of cardiovascular health, known to be impaired in smokers. The first study showed that just 60 mg of vitamin C daily given to a group of smokers for 12 weeks improved endothelial function as assessed by flow-mediated vasodilation. In the second study, Dutch researchers found that 2,000 mg/day of vitamin C for two weeks reversed endothelial dysfunction caused by the abnormal migration of monocytes implicated in atherosclerosis.

    Furthermore, Berkeley public health researchers successfully reduced levels of F2-isoprostanes, a sign of oxidative stress and cell damage, in a group of 67 passive smokers who were given vitamin C supplements daily for two months. The researchers stressed the value of these findings in preventing tobacco smoke-induced health damage in non-smokers.

    VITAMIN C & THE IMPORTANCE OF ANTIOXIDANTS

    Oxidative damage and the resultant inflammatory changes are now known to lie at the root of most common chronic conditions in humans, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Although for many years it was thought that tissue ischemia (lack of oxygen-rich blood) caused the damage from acute conditions such as myocardial infarction (heart attack) and stroke, today we recognize instead that it is the sudden restoration of vital oxygen and the consequent production of reactive oxygen species that wreak major havoc on surviving tissue. This so-called ischemia/reperfusion injury is also now recognized as a critical factor in brain injury following bleeding and head trauma.

    Reactive oxygen species are harmful in other ways as well - they contribute to the DNA damage that is the first step in converting healthy cells into malignant cancers and they impair many of the checks and balances inherent in our immune systems, rendering us potentially vulnerable to deadly infections and their consequences. Finally, healthy lifestyle choices such as exercise and unhealthy activities such as smoking and excessive alcohol consumption produce reactive oxygen species that must be controlled to prevent tissue injury. Scientists studying all of these conditions are rapidly developing a strong appreciation for vitamin C's powerful potential as a preventive and often therapeutic supplement.

    OTHER RECENT ADVANCES IN VITAMIN C THERAPY

    Nutritional researchers are constantly uncovering new health benefits for vitamin C. Recent findings include vitamin Cís role in the following applications:

  • Respiratory Illnesses: The impact of vitamin C in staving off the common cold has been hotly debated for more than three decades. Large, well-designed studies continue to show, however, that regular vitamin C supplements reduce the frequency and duration of the common cold. More serious illnesses also benefit from the antioxidant effects of vitamin C, particularly asthma. Asthmatic children given an antioxidant supplement containing 250 mg vitamin C and 50 mg vitamin E had markedly decreased responses to environmental asthma triggers. And vitamin C supplements (1,000 mg/day) also reduced the amount of long-term inhaled corticosteroids needed by adults with asthma.

  • Cancer: Exciting new work is showing that vitamin C supplementation may decrease the toxic effects of chemotherapy drugs (such as damage to heart tissue) and increase the anti-tumor activity of chemotherapy. Further, promising studies show that vitamin C may synergize with other antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutraceuticals to help fight cancer. Chronic supplementation with vitamin C and other antioxidants might also serve a vital chemopreventive role, reducing the risk of actually developing cancer in the first place.

  • Diabetes: Human studies have now demonstrated that vitamin C supplements may help lower blood glucose levels in diabetics, with additional beneficial reductions in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and plasma free radicals.

  • Stomach Health: Supplementing with vitamin C can also protect against oxidative damage wrought by the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, a major cause of gastritis and stomach ulcers. Vitamin C supplements can also reduce the dose of antibiotics needed to eradicate the organism and may directly prevent the gastritis it causes. And there is encouraging evidence that higher vitamin C levels are associated with lower long-term gastric cancer risk.

  • If you have any questions on the scientific content of this article, please call a Life Extension Health Advisor at 1-800-226-2370.
    For complete article: LEF: Newly Discovered Benefits of Vitamin C

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    32. Trenga CA, Koenig JQ, Williams PV. Dietary antioxidants and ozone-induced bronchial hyperresponsiveness in adults with asthma. Arch Environ Health. 2001 May;56(3):242-9.
    33. Tecklenburg SL, Mickleborough TD, Fly AD, Bai Y, Stager JM. Ascorbic acid supplementation attenuates exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in patients with asthma. Respir Med. 2007 Aug;101(8):1770-8.
    34. Fogarty A, Lewis SA, Scrivener SL, et al. Corticosteroid sparing effects of vitamin C and magnesium in asthma: a randomised trial. Respir Med. 2006 Jan;100(1):174-9.
    35. Bast A, Haenen GR, Bruynzeel AM, Van d, V. Protection by flavonoids against anthracycline cardiotoxicity: from chemistry to clinical trials. Cardiovasc Toxicol. 2007;7(2):154-9.
    36. bdel-Latif MM, Raouf AA, Sabra K, Kelleher D, Reynolds JV. Vitamin C enhances chemosensitization of esophageal cancer cells in vitro. J Chemother. 2005 Oct;17(5):539-49.
    37. Chen J, Kang J, Da W, Ou Y. Combination with water-soluble antioxidants increases the anticancer activity of quercetin in human leukemia cells. Pharmazie. 2004 Nov;59(11):859-63.
    38. Chen J, Wanming D, Zhang D, Liu Q, Kang J. Water-soluble antioxidants improve the antioxidant and anticancer activity of low concentrations of curcumin in human leukemia cells. Pharmazie. 2005 Jan;60(1):57-61.
    39. Correa P, Fontham ET, Bravo JC, et al. Chemoprevention of gastric dysplasia: randomized trial of antioxidant supplements and anti-helicobacter pylori therapy. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2000 Dec 6;92(23):1881-8.
    40. Maramag C, Menon M, Balaji KC, Reddy PG, Laxmanan S. Effect of vitamin C on prostate cancer cells in vitro: effect on cell number, viability, and DNA synthesis. Prostate. 1997 Aug 1;32(3):188-95.
    41. Wei DZ, Yang JY, Liu JW, Tong WY. Inhibition of liver cancer cell proliferation and migration by a combination of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate and ascorbic acid. J Chemother. 2003 Dec;15(6):591-5.
    42. Paolisso G, Balbi V, Volpe C, et al. Metabolic benefits deriving from chronic vitamin C supplementation in aged non-insulin dependent diabetics. J Am Coll Nutr. 1995 Aug;14(4):387-92.
    43. Chuang CH, Sheu BS, Kao AW, et al. Adjuvant effect of vitamin C on omeprazole-amoxicillin-clarithromycin triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication. Hepatogastroenterology. 2007 Jan;54(73):320-4.
    44. Sun YQ, Girgensone I, Leanderson P, Petersson F, Borch K. Effects of antioxidant vitamin supplements on Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils. Helicobacter. 2005 Feb;10(1):33-42.
    45. Waring AJ, Drake IM, Schorah CJ, et al. Ascorbic acid and total vitamin C concentrations in plasma, gastric juice, and gastrointestinal mucosa: effects of gastritis and oral supplementation. Gut. 1996 Feb;38(2):171-6.
    46. Available at: http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminC/. Accessed January 25, 2008.
    47. Available at: http://pdrhealth.com/search/search-results.aspx?searchTerm=vitamin+c. Accessed January 25, 2008.
    48. Lenton KJ, Sane AT, Therriault H, et al. Vitamin C augments lymphocyte glutathione in subjects with ascorbate deficiency. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jan;77(1):189-95.
    49. Tipoe GL, Leung TM, Hung MW, Fung ML. Green tea polyphenols as an anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory agent for cardiovascular protection. Cardiovasc Hematol Disord Drug Targets. 2007 Jun;7(2):135-44.
    50. Comelli MC, Mengs U, Schneider C, Prosdocimi M. Toward the definition of the mechanism of action of silymarin: activities related to cellular protection from toxic damage induced by chemotherapy. Integr Cancer Ther. 2007 Jun;6(2):120-9.
    51. Nicolls MR, Haskins K, Flores SC. Oxidant stress, immune dysregulation, and vascular function in type I diabetes. Antioxid Redox Signal. 2007 Jul;9(7):879-89.
    52. Sureda A, Batle JM, Tauler P, et al. Hypoxia/reoxygenation and vitamin C intake influence NO synthesis and antioxidant defenses of neutrophils. Free Radic Biol Med. 2004 Dec 1;37(11):1744-55.
    53. Polidori MC, Mecocci P, Frei B. Plasma vitamin C levels are decreased and correlated with brain damage in patients with intracranial hemorrhage or head trauma. Stroke. 2001 Apr;32(4):898-902.
    54. Mallette FA, Ferbeyre G. The DNA damage signaling pathway connects oncogenic stress to cellular senescence. Cell Cycle. 2007 Aug 1;6(15):1831-6.
    55. Krohn K, Maier J, Paschke R. Mechanisms of disease: hydrogen peroxide, DNA damage and mutagenesis in the development of thyroid tumors. Nat Clin Pract Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Oct;3(10):713-20.
    56. Wintergerst ES, Maggini S, Hornig DH. Contribution of selected vitamins and trace elements to immune function. Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51(4):301-23.
    57. Hughes DA. Effects of dietary antioxidants on the immune function of middle-aged adults. Proc Nutr Soc. 1999 Feb;58(1):79-84.
    58. El-Taukhy MA, Salama SM, bou-Shousha SA, Ismail SS, Saleh M. Effects of chronic ethanol and vitamin C administration on production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in rats. Egypt J Immunol. 2006;13(1):1-10.





    vitamin C foods


    VITAMIN C DIETARY SOURCES

    The body is not able to make vitamin C on its own, and it does not store vitamin C. It is therefore important to include plenty of vitamin C-containing foods in your daily diet. All fruits and vegetables contain some amount of vitamin C. Vitamin C is found in berries, citrus fruits and juices, and green vegetables. Good sources include acerola cherries, asparagus, avocados, beet greens, black currants, blueberries, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, camu camu fruit, cantaloupe, cauliflower, chili peppers, collards, cranberries, dandelion greens, dulse, grapefruit, green peppers, kale, kiwi fruit, lemons, mangos, mustard greens, onions, oranges, papayas, green peas, sweet peppers, persimmons, pineapple, radishes, red peppers, rose hips, raspberries, spinach, strawberries, sweet potatoes, Swiss chard, tomatoes and tomato juice, turnip greens and other leafy greens, watercress, watermelon, white potatoes, winter squash and yams.

    Some cereals and other foods and beverages are fortified with vitamin C. Fortified means a vitamin or mineral has been added to the food. Check the product labels to see how much vitamin C is in the product. Cooking vitamin C-rich foods or storing them for a long period of time can reduce the vitamin c content. Microwaving and steaming vitamin C-rich foods may reduce cooking losses. The best food sources of vitamin C are uncooked or raw fruits and vegetables.

    Herbs that contain vitamin C include Alfalfa, Burdock Root, Cayenne, Chickweed, Eyebright, Fennel Seed, Fenugreek, Hops, Horsetail, Kelp, Mullein, Nettle, Oat Straw, Paprika, Parsley, Peppermint, Pine Needle, Plantain, Raspberry Leaf, Red Clover, Rose Hips, Skull Cap, Violet Leaves, Yarrow, and Yellow Dock.


    vitamin C fruit





    VITAMIN C DOSAGE INFORMATION

    Vitamin C is water-soluble and comes in pill, capsule, or powder form. As far as supplements are concerned, natural vitamin C complexes are much more potent than the common and less expensive ascorbate forms. However, someone that needs a lot of vitamin C will find that the natural complexes can be cost prohibitive. Mineral ascorbates and ascorbic acid are acceptable forms to take for reaping all of vitamin C's many health benefits. Just be sure to look for vitamin C supplements that are non-GMO, as the vast majority of these supplements come from GMO corn. Read product label directions for use.

    The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for vitamins reflects how much of each vitamin most people should get each day. The RDA for vitamins may be used as goals for each person. How much of each vitamin you need depends on your age and gender. Other factors, such as pregnancy and illnesses, are also important. The best way to get the daily requirement of essential vitamins, including vitamin C, is to eat a balanced diet that contains a variety of foods.


    DIETARY REFERENCE INTAKES FOR VITAMIN C
    AGE
    DOSAGE
     INFANT: Ages 0 to 6 Months
    40* mg/day
     INFANT: Ages 7 to 12 Months
    50* mg/day
     CHILDREN: Ages 1 to 3 Years
    15 mg/day
     CHILDREN: Ages 4 to 8 Years
    25 mg/day
     CHILDREN: Ages 9 to 13 Years
    45 mg/day
     ADOLESCENT GIRLS: Ages 14 to 18 Years
    65 mg/day
     ADOLESCENT PREGNANT TEENS: Ages 14 to 18 Years
    80 mg/day
     ADOLESCENT BREASTFEEDING TEENS: Ages 14 to 18 Years
    115 mg/day
     ADOLESCENT BOYS: Ages 14 to 18 Years
    75 mg/day
     ADULT MEN: Age 19 Years & Older
    90 mg/day
     ADULT WOMEN: Age 19 Years & Older
    75 mg/day
     ADULT PREGNANT WOMEN: Age 19 Years & Older
    85 mg/day
     ADULT BREASTFEEDING WOMEN: Age 19 Years & Older
    120 mg/day

    *Adequate Intake (AI)

    Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding and those who smoke need higher amounts of vitamin C. Smokers or those who are around secondhand smoke at any age should increase their daily amount of vitamin C an additional 35 mg per day. Ask your health care provider what dosage is best for you and your specific health requirements.

    Note: The recommended intake to prevent overt vitamin C deficiency is 90 mg/day for men and 75 mg/day for women who do not smoke; for smokers, 125 mg/day for men and 110 mg/day for women are recommended. Clinical studies suggest that the amount of vitamin C required for optimal health is at least 400 mg/day, with some studies suggesting doses as high as several thousand milligrams daily. Many health practitioners recommend supplementing with at least 1,000 mg of vitamin C daily.

    While vitamin C is generally considered safe and well-tolerated, a few words of caution apply. Individuals who have certain hematologic disorders such as thalassemia, anemia, or glucose-6-phosphate deficiency should consult a physician before supplementing with vitamin C, as should pregnant or nursing women.





    vitamin C food


    VITAMIN C SAFETY, CAUTIONS & INTERACTIONS

    Serious side effects from too much vitamin C are very rare, because the body cannot store the vitamin. However, amounts greater than 2,000 mg daily can lead to stomach upset and diarrhea in some individuals.

  • Alcohol, analgesics, antidepressants, anticoagulants, oral contraceptives, and steroids may reduce levels of vitamin C in the body. Smoking causes a serious depletion of vitamin C.

  • Diabetes medications such as chlorpropamide (Diabinese) and sulfa drugs may not be as effective when taken with vitamin C. Taking high doses of vitamin C may cause a false-negative reading in tests for blood in the stool.

  • For maximum effectiveness, supplemental Vitamin C should be taken in divided doses, twice daily. Esterified vitamin C (Ester-C) is a remarkably effective form of vitamin C, especially for those suffering from chronic illness such as cancer and AIDS. It is created by having the vitamin C react with a necessary mineral, such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, or zinc. This results in a form of the vitamin that is non-acidic and that contains vitamin C metabolites identical to those produced by the body. Esterified vitamin C enters the bloodstream and tissues four times faster than standard vitamin C, moves into the blood cells more efficiently, and also stays in the body tissues longer. The levels of vitamin C in white blood cells achieved by taking esterified vitamin C are four times higher than those achieved with standard vitamin C. Further, only 1/3 as much is lost through excretion in the urine.

  • If aspirin and standard Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) are taken together in large doses, stomach irritation can occur, possibly leading to ulcers. If you take aspirin regularly, use an esterified form of vitamin C.

  • If you are pregnant, do not take more than 5,000 mg of Vitamin C daily. Infants may become dependent on this supplement and develop scurvy when deprived of the accustomed megadoses after birth.

  • Avoid using chewable Vitamin C supplements, as these can damage tooth enamel.

  • Vitamin C deficiency can lead to anemia, bleeding gums, decreased ability to fight infection, decreased wound-healing rate, dry and splittin hair, easy bruising, external bleeding, fatigue, gingivitis (gum inflammation), irritability, nosebleeds, possible weight gain because of slowed metabolism, rough dry and scaly skin, swollen and painful joints, and weakened tooth enamel. A severe form of vitamin C deficiency is known as scurvy, which mainly affects older, malnourished adults.





  • vitamin C supplements


    VITAMIN C (ASCORBIC ACID) & RELATED BIOFLAVONOID PRODUCTS

  • Citrus Bioflavonoid Products
  • Hesperidin Bioflavonoid Products
  • Quercetin Bioflavonoid Products

  • Rutin Bioflavonoid Products
  • Vitamin C Ascorbic Acid Products
  • Vitamin C Buffered Products


  • QUALITY PRODUCTS & SUPPLEMENTS


    FTC Advertising & Affilate Disclosure: This website has an affiliate relationship with certain merchants selling products and we recieve commissions from those sales to help support this website. Any products listed here are not listed by any rating system. We do not rate any product or post any feedback about products listed here. We leave this to the individual merchants to provide. We do not provide product prices or shopping carts since you do not order these products directly from us, but from the merchant providing the products. We only provide the link to that merchant webpage with all related product information and pricing. The products are listed here by merchant, product use, quantity size or volume, and for nutritional supplements - dosage per unit. All product descriptions are provided by the merchant or manufacturer and are not our descriptive review of the product. We do not endorse any specific product or attest to its effectiveness to treat any health condition or support nutritional requirements for any individual.


    VITAMIN C (ASCORBIC ACID) SUPPLEMENT PRODUCTS

    Vitamin C provides antioxidant protection for many of the body's' important enzyme systems. White blood cells utilize Vitamin C to help produce cytotoxic enzymes which they use to eliminate foreign matter. Vitamin C promotes immune function and reduces inflammation. A powerful antioxidant and free radical scavenger that is necessary for tissue repair. Immune system enhancer that reduces allergies, protects the brain and spinal cord, keeps white blood cells healthy, fights fatigue, and increases energy. Take 3,000 to 10,000 mg daily in divided doses or as recommended by a health care provider.

    STARWEST BOTANICALS PRODUCTS

    Starwest Botanicals: Vitamin C, Fine Granules, 100% Pure, 3000 mg/teaspoon, 1 lb.
    Starwest Botanicals: Vitamin C Complex Tablets, 500 mg, 100 Tabs
    Starwest Botanicals: Vitamin C Complex Tablets, 500 mg, 500 Tabs


    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbsPro: Vitamin C, Childrens Orange Flavor, Thompson Nutritional Products, 100 mg, 100 Tabs (35743)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Big Friends Chewables, Tangy Orange, Natural Factors, 250 mg, 90 Chewable Tabs (84255)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C, Thompson Nutritional Products, Orange Flavor, 250 mg, 100 Chews (35741)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C, Buffered, Thompson Nutritional Products, 500 mg, 60 Tabs (35738)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Chewables, Juicy Orange Flavor, Solgar, 500 mg, 90 Tabs (100194)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Chewables, Cran Raspberry Flavor, Solgar, 500 mg, 90 Tabs (100195)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C With Rose Hips, Solgar, 500 mg, 100 Tabs (36857)
    HerbsPro: Ester-C Ascorbate Complex Vitamin C Plus, Solgar, 500 mg, 100 VCaps (36388)
    HerbsPro: Natural Fruit Vitamin C Chews, Jungle Juice, Natural Factors, 500 mg, 180 Chewable Tabs (84250)
    HerbsPro: Natural Fruit Vitamin C Chews, Tangy Orange, Natural Factors, 500 mg, 180 Chewable Tabs (84251)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C-500, Ascorbate Buffered, Natures Way, 500 mg, 250 Caps (18136)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C With Rose Hips, Solgar, 500 mg, 250 Tabs (36858)
    HerbsPro: Ester-C Ascorbate Complex Vitamin C Plus, Solgar, 500 mg, 250 VCaps (36389)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Plus Citrus Bioflavonoids, Buffered Antioxidant, Jarrow Formulas, 750 mg, 100 Tabs (37641)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C, Citrus Bioflavonoid Complex, BlueBonnet Nutrition, 750 mg, 180 VCaps (100611)
    HerbsPro: Ester-C Ascorbate Complex Vitamin C Plus, Solgar, 1000 mg, 30 Tabs (36400)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Plus Rose Hips & Acerola, Thompson Nutritional Products, 1000 mg, 30 Caps (35749)
    HerbsPro: Ester-C Ascorbate Complex Vitamin C Plus, Solgar, 1000 mg, 60 Tabs (36401)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C, Thompson Nutritional Products, 1000 mg (1 Gram), 60 Caps (35747)
    HerbsPro: Ester-C Ascorbate Complex Vitamin C Plus, Solgar, 1000 mg, 90 Tabs (36402)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C-1000 With Rose Hips, Now Foods, 1000 mg, 100 Tabs (67851)
    HerbsPro: Ester-C Ascorbate Complex Vitamin C Plus, Solgar, 1000 mg, 180 Tabs (36399)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C-1000 Complex, Now Foods, 1000 mg, 180 Tabs (67844)
    HerbsPro: Maxi-C Complex Vitamin C, Country Life, 1000 mg, 180 Tabs (37309)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C-1000, Now Foods, 1000 mg, 250 Tabs (67852)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C-1000 Time Release With Rose Hips, Now Foods, 1000 mg, 250 Tabs (67854)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C-1000 With Rose Hips, Natures Way, 1000 mg, 250 Caps (18134)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C With Bioflavonoids, Buffered, Country Life, 1000 mg, 250 Tabs (37032)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C, Solgar, 1000 mg, 250 VCaps (36841)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C With Rose Hips, Solgar, 1500 mg, 180 Tabs (36852)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C-1500, Source Naturals, 1500 mg, 250 Tabs (6153)
    HerbsPro: Emergen-C Vitamin D & Calcium, Mixed Berry, Alacer, 30 Packets (61108)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Crystals, Eclectic Institute, 4 oz. (76306)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Crystals, Buffered, Thompson Nutritional Products, 4 oz. (35745)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Crystals Powder, Thompson Nutritional Products, 4 oz. (35746)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C-Crystals, Country Life, 4 oz. (37535)
    HerbsPro: Alive Vitamin C Powder, Natures Way, 120 Grams (74714)
    HerbsPro: Purely-C Bulk Powder, North American Herb & Spice, 310 mg, 120 grams (75133)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Powder, Thompson Nutritional Products, 8 oz. (35750)
    HerbsPro: Ascorbyl Palmitate Powder (Vitamin C Ester), Source Naturals, 8 oz. (31652)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Crystals, Country Life, 1500 mg, 8 oz. (37536)
    HerbsPro: Ascorbate C Powder, TwinLab, 2000 mg, 8 oz. (19428)
    HerbsPro: Super Ascorbate C Powder, TwinLab, 2000 mg, 8 oz. (19875)
    HerbsPro: Super C Powder, TwinLab, 2000 mg, 8 oz. (19882)
    HerbsPro: Buffered C Crystals Powder, Unflavored, Natures Life, 3600 mg, 8 oz. (89893)
    HerbsPro: Pure C Crystals Powder, Unflavored, Natures Life, 5000 mg, 8 oz. (90137)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Crystals, Solgar, 1125 mg, 8.8 oz. (36848)
    HerbsPro: Buffered Vitamin C Crystals, BlueBonnet Nutrition, 4100 mg, 8.8 oz. (100597)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Crystals, BlueBonnet Nutrition, 4500 mg, 8.8 oz. (100595)
    HerbsPro: Buffered Vitamin C Powder, Nutricology-Allergy Research Group (18311)
    HerbsPro: Organic Rosehip Powder, Starwest Botanicals, 1 lb. (71365)
    HerbsPro: Ascorbic Acid Vitamin C Crystals, Instant Dissolve, Source Naturals, 16 oz. (6098)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Powder, Buffered, Life Extension, 454.6 Grams (91740)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C, Sugar Free Liquid, Buffered, World Organics, 4 fl. oz. (20240)
    HerbsPro: Liquid C With Calcium Ascorbate, TwinLab, 300 mg, 16 fl. oz. (19671)
    HerbsPro: Ester-C Ultra-C Eye Lift Anti-Aging Vitamin C Cream, Jason Naturals, 0.47 oz. (16171)
    HerbsPro: Ester-C Super-C Anti-Aging Vitamin C Skin Care Cleanser, Jason Natural Products, 6 oz. (16154)


    LIFE EXTENSION PRODUCTS

    LEF: Buffered Vitamin C Powder, Life Extension, 1 lb.
    LEF: Vitamin C with Dihydroquercetin, Life Extension, 1000 mg, 60 VCaps
    Vitamin C is an essential nutrient, meaning humans cannot create it internally. Instead, we must get all of our vitamin C from diet or supplements. Unfortunately, vitamin C is also water soluble, meaning that itís quickly oxidized and released inside the body. Until now, the best way to maintain optimal blood levels of vitamin C was to consume it multiple times throughout the day.
    LEF: Vitamin C with Dihydroquercetin, Life Extension, 1000 mg, 250 VCaps
    Vitamin C is an essential nutrient, meaning humans canít create it internally. Instead, we must get all of our vitamin C from diet or supplements. Unfortunately, vitamin C is also water soluble, meaning that it is quickly oxidized and released inside the body. Until now, the best way to maintain optimal blood levels of vitamin C was to consume it multiple times throughout the day. Vitamin C with Dihydroquercetin solves this problem through the addition of the flavonoid antioxidant known as dihydroquercetin. This unique molecule has been shown to supercharge vitamin C by slowing down its oxidation and elimination from the body. The result is more stable and longer-lasting blood levels of vitamin C, plus the antioxidant benefits of dihydroquercetin itself. This synergistic relationship greatly enhances the efficacy of both molecules in the bodyís organs and tissues.
    LEF: Vitamin C Serum, For Skin Care, Life Extension, 1 oz
    Vitamin C Serum rejuvenates and protects stressed skin. The potent 12% concentration of vitamin C improves the brightness, tone, and texture of dehydrated skin. This special blend of vitamin C and concentrated tea extracts also includes important antioxidants. Vitamin C Serum also intensively hydrates skin.


    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C) Crystals, Lab Grade, School Tech Inc: SP
    Kalyx: Vitamin C Fine Granules, Starwest Botanicals, 4 oz: C
    Kalyx: Super C Buffered Vitamin C Powder, Rainbow Light, 4 oz: HF
    Super C Powder provides high-potency vitamin C and antioxidants for whole body immunity, and cell and tissue protection and repair, plus concentrated foods for added nutrition and enhanced digestion without stomach upset. Free Of Artificial colors, flavors, sweeteners, preservatives, sugar, lactose, gluten, yeast, milk, eggs, soy, nuts, fish/shellfish, wheat and animal products. Ingredients include per 1/2 teaspoon serving - Vitamin C (as Calcium Ascorbate)1000 mg, Calcium (from Calcium Ascorbate) 100 mg, Citrus Bioflavonoid Complex 50 mg, Rutin 12.5 mg, Hesperidin 12.5 mg, Cranberry Juice Concentrate 25 mg, Grape (skin] 10:1 Extract (equivalent to 250 mg of fruit powder) 25 mg, Polyphenols 6 mg, Red Cabbage Extract 10 mg, Lemon peel 25 mg, Orange peel 25 mg, 4:1 Antioxidant Fruit Blend (equivalent to 50 mg of fruit powder) Elderberry, Blueberry, Grape, Rose Hip, Acerola, Cranberry, Bilberry 12.5 mg.
    Kalyx: Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid) Powder, Pure, Nutricology, 1000 mg, 120 Grams (4.2 oz): N
    Kalyx: Vitamin C Powder (Ascorbic Acid), Thompson Nutritional, Natural Orange Flavor, 8 oz: K
    Kalyx: Buffered Vitamin C Powder, Nutricology, 240 Grams Powder (8.5 oz): N
    Buffered Vitamin C Powder contains high-purity ascorbic acid buffered with carbonates of potassium, calcium and magnesium. Buffered C has an acid-alkaline buffering action that can help control the increased acidity often associated with allergic reactions. As a dietary supplement, 1 heaping teaspoon or more in 8 to 12 ounces of liquid between meals, or as directed by a healthcare practitioner. As with all vitamin C formulations, as one begins to achieve body saturation, ''bowel tolerance'' may be temporarily exceeded and diarrhea or loose stools may occur. As the high levels of vitamin C in the tissues become used up, the bowel symptoms should ease. Ideal for controlling acidity often associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Ingredients include per teaspoon serving size - Vitamin C (as ascorbic acid) 2135 mg, Calcium (as calcium carbonate) 405 mg, Magnesium (as magnesium carbonate) 215 mg, and Potassium (as potassium carbonate) 90 mg.
    Kalyx: Vitamin C Powder, Frontier Natural Brands Foods, 1 lb: K
    1 teaspoon contains 3,400 mg Vitamin C. This fine ascorbic acid powder can be stirred into any drink, or encapsulated. Vitamin C is perhaps the most popular vitamin among the common nutrients and biochemicals. Because the vitamin is water-soluble, it must be regularly replenished. Vitamin C (commonly referred to as ascorbic acid) is commonly found in fresh fruits, especially in the citrus family: oranges, lemons, limes, and tangerines. It is also abundant in spinach, turnips, mustard greens, peppers, tomatoes, melons and broccoli. Besides playing a paramount role as an anti-oxidant and free radical scavenger, it has been suggested to be an effective antiviral agent by some very respected scientists. Although the antiviral properties of vitamin C remain the subject of scientific debate, this water-soluble vitamin remains one of the most popular and important vitamins. The primary function of vitamin C is to assist in the production of collagen, although it is rapidly becoming identified as a key player in detoxifying the body from foreign substances.
    Kalyx: Vitamin C Fine Granules, Starwest Botanicals, 1 lb: C
    Kalyx: Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid) USP, Kalyx, 25 kg (55 lbs): NB
    Kalyx: Vitamin C For Children, Hylands Homeopathic, 25 mg, 125 Tablets: K
    Most youngsters today take multiple vitamin supplements every day, but many parents feel that extra Vitamin C is important. With Hyland's lemon -flavored tablets, you can give your child as much extra as needed. Each tablet contains 25 mg. of lactose (an inert base) and 25 mg. Vitamin C as Sodium Ascorbate (30 mg. - preferable to Ascorbic Acid where gastric irritation may result from free acid) with pleasant natural lemon flavor.
    Kalyx: Yummi Bears Vitamin C, Hero Nutritional Products, 30 mg, 132 Count: K
    Kalyx: Vitamin C, Deva Vegan, 250 mg 90 Tablets: HF
    Ingredients include Vitamin C (From Acerola Extract, Camu Camu, Rose Hips) 250 mg and Calcium (Carbonate) 100 mg. All natural, non-synthetic, all food based from acerola, camu camu and rosehips.
    Kalyx: Vitamin C Complex, Starwest Botanicals, 500 mg, 100 tablets: C
    Vitamin C (as ascorbic acid) 500 mg, citrus bioflavonoids (citrus spp.-fruit) 100 mg, rutin 50 mg, hesperidin complex (citrus sinensis-fruit) 25 mg, rosehips (rosa canina-fruit) 4 mg, acerola (malpighia glabra-fruit) 1 mg, alfalfa (medicago sativa-leaf) 1 mg, barley grass (hordeum vulgare) 1 mg.
    Kalyx: HerbaLozenges Orange C. Zand, 125 mg 15 Per Bag: K
    Kalyx: Ester-C Chewable Wafers, American Health, 250 mg, 125 Wafers: K
    Kalyx: Buffered Vitamin C, Nutricology, 500 mg, 120 Vegetarian Capsules: N
    Ingredients include per serving (4 capsules) Vitamin C (as Ascorbic Acid) 2000 mg, Calcium (as Calcium Carbonate) 380 mg, Magnesium (as Magnesium Carbonate) 208 mg. Buffered Vitamin C Capsules contains high-purity ascorbic acid buffered with carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Buffered C has an acid-alkaline buffering action that can help control the increased acidity often associated with allergic reactions.
    Kalyx: NutriCology Buffered Vitamin C, 500 mg, 120 Capsules: HF
    Ingredients include per serving (4 capsules) Vitamin C (as Ascorbic Acid) 2000 mg, Calcium (as Calcium Carbonate) 380 mg, Magnesium (as Magnesium Carbonate) 208 mg. Buffered Vitamin C Capsules contains high-purity ascorbic acid buffered with carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Buffered C has an acid-alkaline buffering action that can help control the increased acidity often associated with allergic reactions.
    Kalyx: Vitamin C, Pure, Nutricology, 1000 mg, 100 Caps: N
    This pure Vitamin C is ascorbic acid in unbuffered form, and may be preferred by sensitive individuals who tolerate its mild acidity.
    Kalyx: Vitamin C Plus Natural E With Rose Hips, Kalyx, 6,000 Softgels: GF
    Kalyx: Vitamin C Balancing Facial Toner, Avalon Organics, 8.5 oz: K
    Balancing Facial Toner with Activated Vitamin C will freshen your complexion with improved circulation, clarity and tone. This unique blend of certified organic botanicals and soothing plant emollients will gently remove impurities, tone pores and balance your skin's delicate chemistry.


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Vitamin C Supplement Products

    The above merchants have many more Vitamin C products not listed on this page. If you do not see the product you want listed above, click on one of the above products and do a search on the merchant's website.

  • Nutrition Basics: Vitamin C Antioxidant Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Vitamin C Supplement Information



  • VITAMIN C - BUFFERED SUPPLEMENT PRODUCTS

    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbsPro: Bio Ascorbate Buffered Vitamin C Complex, Solgar, 100 VCaps (36227)
    HerbsPro: Buffered Vitamin C, Nutricology Allergy Research Group, 120 Caps (38744)
    HerbsPro: Bio Ascorbate Buffered Vitamin C Complex, Solgar, 250 VCaps (36228)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C, Buffered, Thompson Nutritional Products, 500 mg, 30 Caps (35737)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C, Buffered, Thompson Nutritional Products, 500 mg, 60 Tabs (35738)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C-500 Buffered, Bluebonnet Nutrition, 500 mg, 90 VCaps (100602)
    HerbsPro: Buffered Vitamin C with Bioflavonoids, Country Life, 500 mg, 100 Tabs (37034)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C-500, Ascorbate Buffered, Natures Way, 500 mg, 100 Caps (18135)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C-500 Buffered, Bluebonnet Nutrition, 500 mg, 180 VCaps (100603)
    HerbsPro: Buffered Vitamin C with Bioflavonoids, Country Life, 500 mg, 250 Tabs (37035)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C-500, Ascorbate Buffered, Natures Way, 500 mg, 250 Caps (18136)
    HerbsPro: Buffered Vitamin C Plus Citrus Bioflavonoids, Antioxidant Protection, Jarrow Formulas, 750 mg, 100 Tabs (37641)
    HerbsPro: Buffered Vitamin C with Bioflavonoids, Country Life, 1000 mg, 50 Tabs (37033)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C-1000 Buffered, Bluebonnet Nutrition, 1000 mg, 90 Caplets (100604)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Buffered With Bioflavonoids, Country Life, 1000 mg, 100 Tabs (37031)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C-1000 Buffered, Bluebonnet Nutrition, 1000 mg, 180 Caplets (100605)
    HerbsPro: Buffered Vitamin C with Bioflavonoids, Country Life, 1000 mg, 250 Tabs (37032)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Sugar Free Liquid Buffered, World Organics, 4 fl. oz. (20240)
    HerbsPro: Liquid C With Calcium Ascorbate, Twinlab, 300 mg, 8 fl. oz. (19672)
    HerbsPro: Liquid C With Calcium Ascorbate, Twinlab, 300 mg, 16 fl. oz. (19671)
    HerbsPro: Calcium Ascorbate Crystals, Source Naturals, 4 oz. (6164)
    HerbsPro: Calcium Ascorbate Crystals, Source Naturals, 4 oz. (6165)
    HerbsPro: Calcium Ascorbate Crystals, Solgar, 4.4 oz. (36265)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Buffered Powder (Calcium Ascorbate), 100% Pure, Now Foods, 890 mg, 8 oz. (67876)
    HerbsPro: Calcium Ascorbate Crystals, Solgar, 8.8 oz. (36266)
    HerbsPro: Buffered Vitamin C Powder, Life Extensionn, 454.6 Grams (91740)
    HerbsPro: Vitamin C Buffered Powder (Calcium Ascorbate), 100% Pure, Now Foods, 890 mg, 3 lb. (67877)


    LIFE EXTENSION PRODUCTS

    LEF: Buffered Vitamin C Powder, Life Extension, 1 lb.


    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Super C Buffered Vitamin C Powder, Rainbow Light, 4 oz: HF
    Super C Powder provides high-potency vitamin C and antioxidants for whole body immunity, and cell and tissue protection and repair, plus concentrated foods for added nutrition and enhanced digestion without stomach upset. Free Of Artificial colors, flavors, sweeteners, preservatives, sugar, lactose, gluten, yeast, milk, eggs, soy, nuts, fish/shellfish, wheat and animal products. Ingredients include per 1/2 teaspoon serving - Vitamin C (as Calcium Ascorbate)1000 mg, Calcium (from Calcium Ascorbate) 100 mg, Citrus Bioflavonoid Complex 50 mg, Rutin 12.5 mg, Hesperidin 12.5 mg, Cranberry Juice Concentrate 25 mg, Grape (skin] 10:1 Extract (equivalent to 250 mg of fruit powder) 25 mg, Polyphenols 6 mg, Red Cabbage Extract 10 mg, Lemon peel 25 mg, Orange peel 25 mg, 4:1 Antioxidant Fruit Blend (equivalent to 50 mg of fruit powder) Elderberry, Blueberry, Grape, Rose Hip, Acerola, Cranberry, Bilberry 12.5 mg.
    Kalyx: Buffered Vitamin C Powder, Nutricology, 240 Grams Powder (8.5 oz): N
    Buffered Vitamin C Powder contains high-purity ascorbic acid buffered with carbonates of potassium, calcium and magnesium. Buffered C has an acid-alkaline buffering action that can help control the increased acidity often associated with allergic reactions. As a dietary supplement, 1 heaping teaspoon or more in 8 to 12 ounces of liquid between meals, or as directed by a healthcare practitioner. As with all vitamin C formulations, as one begins to achieve body saturation, ''bowel tolerance'' may be temporarily exceeded and diarrhea or loose stools may occur. As the high levels of vitamin C in the tissues become used up, the bowel symptoms should ease. Ideal for controlling acidity often associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Ingredients include per teaspoon serving size - Vitamin C (as ascorbic acid) 2135 mg, Calcium (as calcium carbonate) 405 mg, Magnesium (as magnesium carbonate) 215 mg, and Potassium (as potassium carbonate) 90 mg.
    Kalyx: Buffered Vitamin C, Nutricology, 500 mg, 120 Vegetarian Capsules: N
    Ingredients include per serving (4 capsules) Vitamin C (as Ascorbic Acid) 2000 mg, Calcium (as Calcium Carbonate) 380 mg, Magnesium (as Magnesium Carbonate) 208 mg. Buffered Vitamin C Capsules contains high-purity ascorbic acid buffered with carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Buffered C has an acid-alkaline buffering action that can help control the increased acidity often associated with allergic reactions.
    Kalyx: NutriCology Buffered Vitamin C, 500 mg, 120 Capsules: HF
    Ingredients include per serving (4 capsules) Vitamin C (as Ascorbic Acid) 2000 mg, Calcium (as Calcium Carbonate) 380 mg, Magnesium (as Magnesium Carbonate) 208 mg. Buffered Vitamin C Capsules contains high-purity ascorbic acid buffered with carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Buffered C has an acid-alkaline buffering action that can help control the increased acidity often associated with allergic reactions.


  • Nutrition Basics: Vitamin C Antioxidant Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Vitamin C Supplement Information






  • MoonDragon's Womens Health Index

    | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |






    Health & Wellness Index





    AROMATHERAPY: ESSENTIAL OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Allspice Leaf Oil
    Angelica Oil
    Anise Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Basil Oil
    Bay Laurel Oil
    Bay Oil
    Benzoin Oil
    Bergamot Oil
    Black Pepper Oil
    Chamomile (German) Oil
    Cajuput Oil
    Calamus Oil
    Camphor (White) Oil
    Caraway Oil
    Cardamom Oil
    Carrot Seed Oil
    Catnip Oil
    Cedarwood Oil
    Chamomile Oil
    Cinnamon Oil
    Citronella Oil
    Clary-Sage Oil
    Clove Oil
    Coriander Oil
    Cypress Oil
    Dill Oil
    Eucalyptus Oil
    Fennel Oil
    Fir Needle Oil
    Frankincense Oil
    Geranium Oil
    German Chamomile Oil
    Ginger Oil
    Grapefruit Oil
    Helichrysum Oil
    Hyssop Oil
    Iris-Root Oil
    Jasmine Oil
    Juniper Oil
    Labdanum Oil
    Lavender Oil
    Lemon-Balm Oil
    Lemongrass Oil
    Lemon Oil
    Lime Oil
    Longleaf-Pine Oil
    Mandarin Oil
    Marjoram Oil
    Mimosa Oil
    Myrrh Oil
    Myrtle Oil
    Neroli Oil
    Niaouli Oil
    Nutmeg Oil
    Orange Oil
    Oregano Oil
    Palmarosa Oil
    Patchouli Oil
    Peppermint Oil
    Peru-Balsam Oil
    Petitgrain Oil
    Pine-Long Leaf Oil
    Pine-Needle Oil
    Pine-Swiss Oil
    Rosemary Oil
    Rose Oil
    Rosewood Oil
    Sage Oil
    Sandalwood Oil
    Savory Oil
    Spearmint Oil
    Spikenard Oil
    Swiss-Pine Oil
    Tangerine Oil
    Tea-Tree Oil
    Thyme Oil
    Vanilla Oil
    Verbena Oil
    Vetiver Oil
    Violet Oil
    White-Camphor Oil
    Yarrow Oil
    Ylang-Ylang Oil
    Aromatherapy
    Healing Baths For Colds
    Aromatherapy
    Herbal Cleansers
    Using Essential Oils


    AROMATHERAPY: HERBAL & CARRIER OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Almond, Sweet Oil
    Apricot Kernel Oil
    Argan Oil
    Arnica Oil
    Avocado Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Black Cumin Oil
    Black Currant Oil
    Black Seed Oil
    Borage Seed Oil
    Calendula Oil
    Camelina Oil
    Castor Oil
    Coconut Oil
    Comfrey Oil
    Evening Primrose Oil
    Flaxseed Oil
    Grapeseed Oil
    Hazelnut Oil
    Hemp Seed Oil
    Jojoba Oil
    Kukui Nut Oil
    Macadamia Nut Oil
    Meadowfoam Seed Oil
    Mullein Oil
    Neem Oil
    Olive Oil
    Palm Oil
    Plantain Oil
    Plum Kernel Oil
    Poke Root Oil
    Pomegranate Seed Oil
    Pumpkin Seed Oil
    Rosehip Seed Oil
    Safflower Oil
    Sea Buckthorn Oil
    Sesame Seed Oil
    Shea Nut Oil
    Soybean Oil
    St. Johns Wort Oil
    Sunflower Oil
    Tamanu Oil
    Vitamin E Oil
    Wheat Germ Oil





    HELPFUL RELATED MOONDRAGON NUTRITION BASICS LINKS

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Amino Acids Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Antioxidants Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Enzymes Information
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Herbs Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Homeopathics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Hydrosols Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Minerals Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Mineral Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary & Cosmetic Supplements Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary Supplements Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Specialty Supplements
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Introduction


  • NUTRITION BASICS ARTICLES

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: 4 Basic Nutrients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Foods That Contain Additives & Artificial Ingredients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Is Aspartame A Safe Sugar Substitute?
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Guidelines For Selecting & Preparing Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Destroy
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Heal
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: The Micronutrients: Vitamins & Minerals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Overcooking Your Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Phytochemicals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Increase Your Consumption of Raw Produce
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Limit Your Use of Salt
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Use Proper Cooking Utensils
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Choosing The Best Water & Types of Water





  • RELATED MOONDRAGON HEALTH LINKS & INFORMATION

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Analysis Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Diet Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Recipe Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Therapy: Preparing Produce for Juicing
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Additives Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Safety Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Articles
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Back Pain
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Labor & Birth
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Blending Chart
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Essential Oil Details
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Miscarriage
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Post Partum
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Childbearing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Problems in Pregnancy & Birthing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #1
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #2
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Tips
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Uses
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Information Overview
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Touch & Movement Therapies Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy: Touch & Movement: Aromatherapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Therapy: Touch & Movement - Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Therapeutic Massage
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 1
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 2
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Hydrotherapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Pain Control Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Relaxation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Steam Inhalation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy - Herbal Oils Index







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