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MoonDragon's Health & Wellness
Nutrition Basics

Supplements
CITRIC ACID

(Lemon Salt, Sour Salt)


For Informational Use Only
For more detailed information contact your health care provider
about options that may be available for your specific situation.





  • Citric Acid Description
  • Citric Acid Uses, Health Benefits & Scientific Evidence
  • Citric Acid Dosage Information
  • Citric Acid Safety, Cautions & Interactions
  • Citric Acid Products




  • Citric Acid Powder


    CITRIC ACID DESCRIPTION

    Citric acid is found naturally in several fruits and berries, and is commonly added to many foods and beverages as a preservative or for flavor. It has a tart taste, and is also known as lemon salt or sour salt. Many of people use citric acid to clean dishwashers and dishes, or to make fizzy bath bombs.

    Citric acid is completely natural, produced by cells during the Krebs cycle. In 1953 a Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine was given to the British biochemist Sir Adolf Krebs for demonstrating the Krebs Cycle, also called the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle, and the Citric Acid Cycle. Inside each living cell are mitochondria, which are the 'power plants' of the cell. The citric acid cycle takes place inside this small organelle found inside most living things and some bacteria. When you eat you intake many simple sugars and glucose. It is important that these sugars be metabolized. The final result is carbon dioxide, water, and energy. Krebs is credited with demonstrating the chemical steps of this Citric Acid Cycle. Without citric acid, the body could not make usable energy. The citric acid cycle helps make the starting materials for the synthesis of carbohydrates and amino acids.

    The acid gets its name from the citrus fruit family, which includes lemons, limes, oranges, tangerines, and grapefruits. Citrus fruits, especially the more sour ones like lemons and limes, owe their sharp taste to citric acid.





    Citric Acid Crystallized Powder


    CITRIC ACID USES, HEALTH BENEFITS, & SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE

    CITRIC ACID IN FOODS

    CULINARY USES

    Citric Acid has been used as an ingredient in pretty much everything: cheeses, ice cream, alcoholic beverages, breads, and more. Because of its characteristic tart flavor, citric acid is often added to soft drinks and sour candies. The white, powdery coating on sour candies is often citric acid.

    Use citric acid in place of lemon juice: Although its flavor is slightly less complex than the flavor of a lemon, citric acid can be substituted literally anywhere lemon juice is used. An easy use of citric acid is to use it in place of lemon juice in homemade lemonade. Dissolve one teaspoon of citric acid and sugar and adjust to taste in a glass of water. Citric acid will enhance the lemon or lime flavor in any citrus-based recipe.

    Keep fresh fruits from browning with citric acid. Use citric acid on cut fresh fruit and when making homemade canned goods instead of lemon juice. The acid has the same effect as lemons in preventing fresh fruit from browning and regulates the pH level in canned goods to prevent bacteria growth. You can even add citric acid to marinades, homemade jams, and more. A spoonful of citric acid is often added to fruit for home-canning to keep canned fruits from turning brown, keeping them colorful and to help prevent spoilage.


    ABOUT CANNING FRUITS

    Processing is essential to ensure safety when canning fruits. Fruits, being acidic foods, can be processed safely in a boiling-water bath. However, some people prefer to pressure-process fruits. This is also an acceptable method. Organisms that cause food spoilage (molds, yeasts and bacteria) always are present in the air, water and soil. Also, enzymes that may cause undesirable changes in flavor, color and texture are present in raw fruits. Use recommended processing methods and times when canning fruits to destroy spoilage organisms and stop the action of enzymes.

    Citric acid is often used when canning fruits with a low acid content. Acid is required to kill botulinum spores that can cause a deadly form of food poisoning called botulism. Heat alone will not usually destroy them. Very few fruits contain enough acid to naturally combat these spores. Even fruits that are considered to be high in acid, such as tomatoes, require a boost from citric acid.

    Citric acid is used to bring canned fruit's pH level to below 4.6, which is the point that botulinum spores are destroyed. All low-acid foods have a pH level that is higher than 4.6. Some canning recipes, such as those for pickles, sauerkraut and jam, call for an acid component that renders the food safe. When canning fruits in syrup or juice, however, it is very important to add the citric acid. In addition to keeping food poisoning at bay, citric acid also prevents fruits, such as apples and pears, from turning brown in the jars.

    Immersing the fruit in a mixture of citric acid and juice or sugar syrup (making a citric syrup) is the best way to raise canned fruit's acid content. The amount of syrup required depends on the type of fruit. Most canning instructions will include the amount of acid needed for the particular fruit. Generally speaking, you should add 1 tablepoon of citric acid for every quart of liquid in the syrup.

    CONSIDERATIONS

    Choose fruit that is fresh, firm and free of rotten spots. Wash the fruit thoroughly before processing it. Make sure that all canning supplies, including jars, lids and seals, are sterile. For more information: Home Canning Fruits

    HOME-CANNED PEACHES RECIPE (Water-Bath Method)

    Canned peaches are a wonderful way to enjoy peaches year round. Once canned, they are excellent for baking or paired with yogurt and cereal for breakfast.

    Ingredients
      1 1/2 cups sugar
      4 cups water
      12 cups fresh peaches, peeled and sliced (about 4 pounds)
      4 pint jars, lids, and rings, washed with warm soapy water

    Preparation

    To prevent peaches from turning brown, you can soak them in a solution of 1 teaspoon of citric acid or fruit fresh or 3000 mg Vitamin C per cup of water. Allow the sliced peaches to soak while sterilizing jars and making simple syrup.

    In a large saucepan, dissolve sugar and water over medium-high heat. Bring water to a boil in a large stock pot. Using tongs, transfer lids, rings, and jars to water and boil for 5 minutes. Remove, using tongs, and let drain on towel.

    While jars are still warm, fill each with sliced peaches and top with sugar syrup, leaving 1/2-inch headspace at the top of each jar. Remove air pockets by pressing peaches down with the end of a wooden spoon. Secure jars with lids until they are finger tight and process jars in boiling water for 25 minutes.

    Remove jars from pot using tongs or a jar lifter and lay on towel to cool. Once jars have cooled and lids have sealed (you will hear a slight popping sound as the lids seal), tighten lid rings firmly and store in a cool, dark place for up to a year. You can test for sealing by pressing the center of the lid slightly with your finger. If the canning lid is dipped downward in the center with no flexing movement, it is sealed. If it moves slightly up and down, it has not sealed.


    Citric acid can be used to curdle milk to make your own ricotta cheese.

    Use citric acid instead of salt on your foods. If you are watching your sodium intake, citric acid can be used as a substitute for salt in sour breads, such as sourdough and rye. Substitute an equal amount of citric acid for salt for the same flavor and none of the sodium. Add 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon per loaf will give your sourdough bread a wonderful tang.

    Add sourness to sweets: When you are making homemade candy, finish it off with a coating of citric acid for the classic mouth puckering sourness. Or add it to soft drinks for a seriously lemony-lime soda.
    Use citric acid as an aid in homemade foods: When you are making homemade ice cream or cheese, citric acid helps you reach successful results. It acts as an emulsifier in homemade ice cream by keeping away fat globules. Added to cheese, citric acid helps the milk curdle and solidify.

    NON-FOOD USES FOR CITRIC ACID

    There are also non-food uses to citric acid. Use citric acid to clean dishwashers and dishes. Add a tablespoon to y our dishwasher to clean and delime it. It also works for coffee makers.

    One really fun use of citric acid is bath bombs. When you put a bath bomb in water, it will erupt and fizz, making for an enjoyable bath. Many people combine citric acid and baking soda to make homemade bath bombs, adding oils and fragrances for a pleasant aroma.

    Citric acid's mildly acidic properties make it a great cleaning agent. When added to dishwashing detergents, citric acid can soften water and remove hard water deposits from dishes, dishwashers, coffeemakers, kettles, and pipes (this is known as descaling).

    Some people use citric acid in shampoos, skin care, and photography. It is used in shampoos to lower the pH levels so hair will turn out smoother and shinier. In skin care, it may improve the health of skin cells by stimulating collagen production and acting as an antioxidant. When developing film, the citric acid is used to quickly stop the development of photos.

    HEALTH BENEFITS OF CITRIC ACID

    Citric acid is great for internal use. It reduces you level of physiological stress and also helps maintain energy levels, especially in people involved with physical activity and hard work. The acid also helps to metabolize food within the digestive process. It works by specifically attacking carbohydrates and metabolizing them into carbon dioxide and water, helping your system run more efficiently.

    Studies have shown that citric acid can help your bones absorb calcium more easily. Its ability to easily bond with minerals aids the absorption and digestion of minerals.

    Kidney and urinary health is another big benefit of this supplement. Citric acid has been shown to promote urinary tract health. Citric acid can help prevent small kidney stones from growing into larger, problematic stones. The citric acid coats the stones and prevents materials from sticking to them and making them larger. Citric acid and sodium citrate are both alkalinizing agents that make the urine less acidic. The combination of citric acid and sodium citrate is used to prevent gout or kidney stones, or metabolic acidosis in people with kidney problems.


    CITRIC ACID PROFILE

    By Mountain Rose Herbs

    OVERVIEW

    Our Citric Acid is derived from 100% pure anhydrous citric acid from crystallized fruit sugar. The crystallization process occurs by a submerged fermentation process, using natural carbohydrates, such as sugar and dextrose, as a substrate. Our citric acid comes from the fermentation of crude fruit sugars and is chiefly used to help extend a productís shelf life, in retaining a product's texture, and guarding against appearance loss. It is also a fabulous base ingredient in bath fizzies and scrubbing salts. Blends easily and fluidly without creating a gritty feeling to the final product.
    The particular variety of Citric Acid offered by Mountain Rose Herbs is USP grade and is soluble in water and alcohol. USP grade signifies that it has been certified by the United States Pharmacopeia, which ensures that products are the appropriate identity as well as strength, quality, purity and consistency. Citric acid is a very useful and effective preservative, obtained from naturally occurring organic acids. It exists in many different fruits and vegetables, but is especially concentrated in lemons and limes. Although it is also produced in refineries by using cane sugar, molasses, and dextrose, the citric acid stocked by Mountain Rose Herbs comes from the fermentation of crude fruit sugars. Citric acid is present in almost every life form, it is consequently easily metabolized and eliminated from the body.
    Citric acid is used extensively in the food, beverage, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. It has been recognized as safe by all major national and international food regulatory agencies, and is also approved by the FDA and in Europe for use in food. Citric acid is often a base ingredient in bath bomb recipes, and is the agent responsible for the "fizzing" action. At room temperature, Citric acid is a white powdered form. However, it may be dissolved and easily incorporated into your recipes by heating it in a liquid mixture to a temperature above 165°F (74°C).

    SUGGESTED USE: Food and cosmetic use.

    TYPICAL ANALYSIS
    • Assay: 100% Pure
    • Color: White
    • Appearance: Crystalline powder.
    • Odor: Odorless
    • Heavy Metals: Less than 3 ppm.
    • Moisture: 0.05%
    • Storage Temperature: Not to exceed 90°F.
    • Mesh Size: US #30 Mesh.
    For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.





    CITRIC ACID DOSAGE INFORMATION

    SUPPLEMENT FORMS

    CANNING FOODS USING CITRIC ACID

    Citric acid is often added when canning fruits at home so that the preserved fruit is safe to eat. Though most fruit has some acid, a specific pH balance is required to kill harmful bacteria that can cause food poisoning. Citric acid helps kill those bacteria. Citric acid is a food preservative that is sold as a powder and mixed with water to create a syrup solution that you can then add to fruit before sealing the cans. You can use lemon juice can as an alternative, however citric acid is usually more effective.

  • Tomatoes & Tomato Mixtures: A standard acidification seems to be for each pint of tomatoes add either 1/4 teaspoon citric acid OR 1 tablespoon lemon juice. For each quart tomatoes add either 1/2 teaspoon citric acid OR 2 tablespoons lemon juice.

  • Figs: Add 2 tablespoons bottled lemon juice per quart or 1 tablespoon per pint to the jars; or add 1/2 teaspoon citric acid per quart or 1/4 teaspoon per pint to the jars.

  • King & Dungeness Crab Meat: Add 1/2 teaspoon of citric acid or 2 tablespoons of lemon juice to each half-pint jar, or 1 teaspoon of citric acid or 4 tablespoons of lemon juice per pint jar. Crab meat canned according to the recommended procedure may have a distinctly acidic flavor.

  • Note that adding citric acid to foods does not allow short cuts with recommended canning methods. Always follow recommended preservation methods carefully to help prevent spoilage and microbial contaminations resulting in food poisoning.

    DIETARY SUPPLEMENT

    The recommended dosage of citric acid supplement is 500 mg two times per day with meals or as a flavoring agent.

    CHRONIC ACIDOSIS

    For long-term maintenance of an alkaline urine; alleviation of chronic metabolic acidosis; buffering and neutralizing gastric hydrochloric acid. Generally well tolerated when taken in recommended doses by patients with normal renal function and urinary output.
    • Sodium Citrate/Citric Acid - Solution 500 mg sodium citrate/334 mg citric acid per 5 mL (1 mEq sodium equivalent to 1 mEq bicarbonate/mL)
    • Oracit - Solution 490 mg sodium citrate/640 mg citric acid per 5 mL (1 mEq sodium equivalent to 1 mEq bicarbonate/mL)
    Sodium citrate is metabolized to sodium bicarbonate, thus acting as a systemic alkalizer.

    Systemic Alkalization Adults: Oral dosage 2 to 6 teaspoons (10 to 30 mL), diluted in 1 to 3 ounces of water, after meals and at bedtime, or as directed by health care provider. Children: 2 years of age and older, oral dosage 1 to 3 teaspoons (5 to 15 mL), diluted in 1 to 3 ounces of water, after meals and at bedtime, or as directed by health care provider.

    Neutralizing Buffer Adults: Oral dosage 3 teaspoon (15 mL), diluted in 15 mL of water, taken as a single dose, or as directed by healthcare provider.

    Contraindications: Patients on sodium-restricted diets; impaired renal function with oliguria, azotemia, or anuria; untreated Addison disease; adynamia episodica hereditaria; acute dehydration; heat cramps; severe myocardial damage; hyperkalemia.

    Storage/Stability: Store syrup at controlled room temperature (59 to 86°). Keep tightly capped and protect from freezing or excessive heat. Drug Interactions
    • Sodium citrate Anorexiants, flecainide, mecamylamine, quinidine, sympathomimetics: Urinary alkalinizers may decrease the excretion and increase the serum levels of these agents, possibly increasing their pharmacologic effects.
    • Chlorpropamide, lithium, methenamine, methotrexate, salicylates, tetracyclines: Urinary alkalinizers may increase the excretion and decrease the serum levels of these agents, possibly decreasing their pharmacologic effects.
    Adverse Reactions
    • Metabolic: Hypernatremia; metabolic alkalosis.
    • GI: Diarrhea; loose bowel movements. Dilute with water to minimize GI disturbance. Take after meals to avoid saline laxative effect.
    • Renal Function: Because alkalosis can occur, especially in the presence of hypocalcemia, use with caution.
    • Special Risk Patients: Sodium salts should be used with caution in patients with cardiac failure, hypertension, impaired renal function, peripheral and pulmonary edema, and toxemia of pregnancy.
    • Urolithiasis: Citrate mobilizes calcium from bones and increases its renal excretion; this, along with the elevated urine pH, may predispose to urolithiasis.
    • Overdosage Symptoms: Diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, hypernoia (excessive mental activity), convulsions.
    • Patient Information: Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your health care provider. Do not take it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Citric acid and sodium citrate should be taken after meals to help prevent stomach or intestinal side effects. You may also need to take the medicine at bedtime. Follow your health care provider's instructions. Shake the oral solution (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. To be sure you get the correct dose, measure the liquid with a marked measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one. The liquid medicine should be mixed with at lease 4 ounces of water or juice. Drink this mixture slowly and then add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away. You may chill the mixed medicine to make it taste better, but do not allow it to freeze. Drink plenty of liquids while you are taking citric acid and sodium citrate. Your treatment may include a special diet. It is very important to follow the diet plan created for you by your health care provider or nutrition counselor. You should become very familiar with the list of foods you should eat or avoid to help control your condition. Avoid salty foods and use of extra table salt. To be sure citric acid and sodium citrate is helping your condition, your blood and urine may need to be tested often. Store citric acid and sodium citrate at room temperature away from moisture, heat, or freezing. Keep the medication in a closed container. Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Overdose symptoms may include muscle spasms or seizure (convulsions). Inform health care provider if any of the following occur: edema, nausea, stomach pain, vomiting, decreased urine production, persistent diarrhea, or any other bothersome adverse reactions.Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If you are more than 2 hours late in taking your medicine, wait until your next regularly scheduled time to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.





    CITRIC ACID SAFETY, CAUTIONS & INTERACTIONS

    SAFETY CONCERNS

    CITRIC ACID THERAPY FOR CHRONIC ACIDOSIS

    You should not use this medication if you have kidney failure, severe heart damage (such as from a prior heart attack), Addison's disease (an adrenal gland disorder), high levels of potassium in your blood (hyperkalemia), or if you are severely dehydrated or have heat cramps.

    Before you take citric acid and sodium citrate, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions, especially kidney disease, heart disease, high blood pressure, a history of heart attack, urinary problems, swelling (edema), or chronic diarrhea (such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease). Also tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including over-the-counter medications and household remedies.

    Citric acid and sodium citrate should be taken after meals to help prevent stomach or intestinal side effects. The liquid medicine should be mixed with water or juice. Drink plenty of liquids while you are taking citric acid and sodium citrate. Your treatment may include a special diet. You should become very familiar with the list of foods you should eat or avoid to help control your condition.

    Avoid using antacids without your doctor's advice, including household baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). Antacids that contain aluminum or sodium can interact with citric acid and sodium citrate, causing a serious electrolyte imbalance or aluminum toxicity. Avoid eating foods that are high in salt, or using extra table salt on your meals.

    To be sure citric acid and sodium citrate is helping your condition, your blood and urine may need to be tested often. Follow your health care provider's instructions carefully and do not miss any scheduled appointments.

    Serious side effects of citric acid and sodium citrate therapy include muscle twitching or cramps, swelling or weight gain, weakness, mood changes, rapid and shallow breathing, fast heart rate, restless feeling, black or bloody stools, severe diarrhea, or seizure (convulsions). You should not use this medication if you are allergic to it, or if you have:
    • Kidney failure
    • Severe heart damage (such as from a prior heart attack).
    • Addison's disease (an adrenal gland disorder).
    • High levels of potassium in your blood (hyperkalemia) or if you are severely dehydrated or have heat cramps.
    If you have certain conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take this medication. Before you take citric acid and sodium citrate, tell your doctor if you have:
    • Kidney disease.
    • Congestive heart failure, enlarged heart, or history of heart attack.
    • Other heart disease or high blood pressure.
    • Low levels of calcium in your blood (hypocalcemia).
    • A urinary tract infection.
    • Toxemia of pregnancy.
    • Urination problems (or if you are unable to urinate).
    • Swelling of your hands or feet, or in your lungs (pulmonary edema); or chronic diarrhea (such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease).

    It is not known whether this medication is harmful to an unborn baby. Before taking citric acid and sodium citrate, Tell your health care provider if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether citric acid and sodium citrate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your health care provider if you are breast-feeding a baby.

    Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

    Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:
    • Swelling, tingling, or numbness in your hands or feet.
    • Muscle twitching or pain, leg pain or cramps.
    • Unusual weakness, rapid and shallow breathing, fast or slow heart rate, dizziness, confusion, or mood changes.
    • Feeling restless, nervous, or irritable.
    • Black, bloody, or tarry stools.
    • Severe or ongoing diarrhea.
    • Seizure (convulsions).

    Less serious side effects may include:
    • Nausea, or vomiting, stomach pain.
    • Mild or occasional diarrhea or mild stomach pain.

    Avoid using antacids without your health care provider's advice, including household baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). Antacids that contain aluminum or sodium can interact with citric acid and sodium citrate, causing a serious electrolyte imbalance or aluminum toxicity.

    Avoid eating foods that are high in salt, or using extra table salt on your meals.

    It is very important to follow any diet plan created for you by your health care provider or nutrition counselor. You should become very familiar with the list of foods you should eat or avoid to help control your condition.

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    The following drugs can interact with citric acid and sodium citrate. Tell your health care provider if you are using any of these:
    • Lithium (Eskalith, LithoBid)
    • Methenamine (Hiprex, Mandelamine, Urex)
    • Quinidine (Quinaglute, Quinidex, Quin-Release)
    • Cold or allergy medicine (decongestants), diet pills, ADHD medication.
    • Aa vitamin, mineral supplement, or medication that contains calcium.
    • Salicylates such as aspirin, Backache Relief Extra Strength, Novasal, Nuprin Backache Caplet, Doan's Pills Extra Strength, Tricosal, and others; or an antacid that contains aluminum or sodium, including Alka-Seltzer, Maalox, Mylanta, Di-Gel, Gelusil, Alamag Plus, Rulox Plus, Tempo, and others.

    This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with citric acid and sodium citrate. Tell your health care provider about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other health care providers. Do not start a new medication without telling your health care provider.





    CITRIC ACID PRODUCTS

  • Citric Acid Supplement Products

  • Sodium Citrate Supplement Products


  • QUALITY SUPPLIES & PRODUCTS


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    CITRIC ACID SUPPLEMENT PRODUCTS

    MOUNTAIN ROSE HERBS PRODUCTS

    Mountain Rose Herbs: Citric Acid, Bulk Miscellaneous Products
    Anhydrous Citric Acid comes from the fermentation of crude fruit sugars and is chiefly used to help extend a products shelf life, in retaining a products texture and guarding against appearance loss. It is also a fabulous base ingredient in bath fizzies and scrubbing salts. Blends easily and fluidly without creating a gritty feeling to the final product. Choose from 2 different sizes.


    STARWEST BOTANICALS

    Starwest Botanicals: Citric Acid, Fine Granules, 1 lb.


    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbsPro: Citric Acid, Now Foods, 4 oz.
    Citric Acid is useful in sprouting, canning, drying or freezing. It can be used to preserve Vitamin C content, retard spoilage by bacterial growth, and prevent discoloration. Use 1 tsp. per quart of water or juice for most fruits and vegetables. 100% Pure - Helps Sprouting - A food grade Citric Acid that is present in many natural foods. It can be used to reduce spoilage in sprouting by adding 1 teaspoon per quart to soak and rinse water.
    HerbsPro: Citric Acid, FunFresh Foods, 10 oz.
    Citric acid is a natural preservative used for canning and sprouting. Gluten free.
    HerbsPro: Citric Acid, Now Foods, 1 lb.
    Citric Acid is useful in sprouting, canning, drying or freezing. It can be used to preserve Vitamin C content, retard spoilage by bacterial growth, and prevent discoloration. Use 1 tsp. per quart of water or juice for most fruits and vegetables. 100% Pure - Helps Sprouting - A food grade Citric Acid that is present in many natural foods. It can be used to reduce spoilage in sprouting by adding 1 teaspoon per quart to soak and rinse water.


    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Mrs. Wages Citric Acid, Precision Foods, 5 oz. (Case of 12): GR
    Mrs. Wages Citric Acid can be used for canning tomatoes at home. Citric Acid will increase the acidity of home canned tomatoes when prepared by the boiling water process. Contents of this package will process approximately 50 quarts of tomatoes. Each case consists of twelve 5 ounce packs.
    Kalyx: Citric Acid, Starwest Botanicals, 1 lb: C
    Kalyx: Citric Acid Fine Granules, Frontier Foods, 1 lb: K
    To prevent the browning of cut fruit, mix one teaspoon of citric acid with one quart of cold water; pour over fruit. The glucose is derived from certified GMO-free corn. Citric acid is not Vitamin C (ascorbic acid). It is responsible for the tart taste found in pineapples, gooseberries, limes, lemons, oranges, and grapefruit.
    Kalyx: Citric Acid, Dutch Valley, 10 lbs: GR
    Kalyx: Citric Acid, Tilley Chemical Co, 55 lbs: GR


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon:Citric Acid Supplement Products
    Amazon: Citric Acid Grocery & Gourmet Food Products

  • Nutrition Basics: Citric Acid Information



  • SODIUM CITRATE SUPPLEMENT PRODUCTS

    Sodium Citrate (E331) is the sodium salt of citric acid. Like citric acid, it has a sour taste. Like other salts, it also has a salty taste. It is commonly known as sour salt and is mainly used as a food additive, usually for flavor or as a preservative. It gives club soda both its sour and salty flavors. It reduces the acidity of foods, so it allows spherification with strongly acidic ingredients. Sodium citrate is also used as an antioxidant in food as well as a sequestrant. It dissolves easily and acts instantaneously.

    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Sodium Citrate Supplement Products
    Amazon: Sodium Citrate Grocery & Gourmet Food Products

  • Nutrition Basics: Citric Acid Information






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    HELPFUL RELATED MOONDRAGON NUTRITION BASICS LINKS

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Amino Acids Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Antioxidants Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Enzymes Information
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Herbs Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Homeopathics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Hydrosols Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Minerals Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Mineral Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary & Cosmetic Supplements Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary Supplements Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Specialty Supplements
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Introduction


  • NUTRITION BASICS ARTICLES

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: 4 Basic Nutrients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Foods That Contain Additives & Artificial Ingredients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Is Aspartame A Safe Sugar Substitute?
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Guidelines For Selecting & Preparing Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Destroy
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Heal
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: The Micronutrients: Vitamins & Minerals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Overcooking Your Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Phytochemicals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Increase Your Consumption of Raw Produce
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Limit Your Use of Salt
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Use Proper Cooking Utensils
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Choosing The Best Water & Types of Water





  • RELATED MOONDRAGON HEALTH LINKS & INFORMATION

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Analysis Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Diet Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Recipe Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Therapy: Preparing Produce for Juicing
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Additives Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Safety Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Articles
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Back Pain
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Labor & Birth
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Blending Chart
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Essential Oil Details
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Miscarriage
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Post Partum
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Childbearing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Problems in Pregnancy & Birthing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #1
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #2
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Tips
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Uses
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Information Overview
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Touch & Movement Therapies Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy: Touch & Movement: Aromatherapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Therapy: Touch & Movement - Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Therapeutic Massage
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 1
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 2
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Hydrotherapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Pain Control Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Relaxation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Steam Inhalation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy - Herbal Oils Index







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    MOONDRAGON'S REALM - WEBSITE DIRECTORY


    A website map to help you find what you are looking for on MoonDragon.org's Website. Available pages have been listed under appropriate directory headings.




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