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MoonDragon's Health & Wellness
Nutrition Basics

Supplements
CHEESE

Dairy Foods


"For Informational Use Only"
For more detailed information contact your health care provider
about options that may be available for your specific situation.





  • Cheese Description
  • Cheese Uses, Health Benefits & Scientific Evidence
  • Cheese Production Information
  • Types of Cheeses
  • Culinary Use & Nutrition
  • Cheese Safety, Cautions & Interactions
  • Cheese & Related Dairy Products






  • CHEESE DESCRIPTION

    Cheese is a food derived from milk that is produced in a wide range of flavors, textures, and forms by coagulation of the milk protein casein. It comprises proteins and fat from milk, usually the milk of cows, buffalo, goats, or sheep. During production, the milk is usually acidified, and adding the enzyme rennet causes coagulation. The solids are separated and pressed into final form. Some cheeses have molds on the rind or throughout. Most cheeses melt at cooking temperature.

    Hundreds of types of cheese from various countries are produced. Their styles, textures and flavors depend on the origin of the milk (including the animal's diet), whether they have been pasteurized, the butterfat content, the bacteria and mold, the processing, and aging. Herbs, spices, or wood smoke may be used as flavoring agents. The yellow to red color of many cheeses, such as Red Leicester, is produced by adding annatto. Other ingredients may be added to some cheeses, such as black pepper, garlic, chives or cranberries.

    For a few cheeses, the milk is curdled by adding acids such as vinegar or lemon juice. Most cheeses are acidified to a lesser degree by bacteria, which turn milk sugars into lactic acid, then the addition of rennet completes the curdling. Vegetarian alternatives to rennet are available; most are produced by fermentation of the fungus Mucor miehei, but others have been extracted from various species of the Cynara thistle family. Cheesemakers near a dairy region may benefit from fresher, lower-priced milk, and lower shipping costs.

    Cheese is valued for its portability, long life, and high content of fat, protein, calcium, and phosphorus. Cheese is more compact and has a longer shelf life than milk, although how long a cheese will keep depends on the type of cheese; labels on packets of cheese often claim that a cheese should be consumed within three to five days of opening. Generally speaking, hard cheeses, such as parmesan last longer than soft cheeses, such as Brie or goat's milk cheese. The long storage life of some cheeses, especially when encased in a protective rind, allows selling when markets are favorable.

    There is some debate as to the best way to store cheese, but some experts say that wrapping it in cheese paper provides optimal results. Cheese paper is coated in a porous plastic on the inside, and the outside has a layer of wax. This specific combination of plastic on the inside and wax on the outside protects the cheese by allowing condensation on the cheese to be wicked away while preventing moisture from within the cheese escaping.

    A specialist seller of cheese is sometimes known as a cheesemonger. Becoming an expert in this field requires some formal education and years of tasting and hands-on experience, much like becoming an expert in wine or cuisine. The cheesemonger is responsible for all aspects of the cheese inventory: selecting the cheese menu, purchasing, receiving, storage, and ripening.





    cheeses


    CHEESE HISTORY

    ORIGINS OF CHEESE

    Cheese is an ancient food whose origins predate recorded history. There is no conclusive evidence indicating where cheesemaking originated, either in Europe, Central Asia or the Middle East, but the practice had spread within Europe prior to Roman times and, according to Pliny the Elder, had become a sophisticated enterprise by the time the Roman Empire came into being.

    The earliest evidence of cheese-making in the archaeological record dates back to 5,500 BCE, in what is now Kujawy, Poland, where strainers with milk fats molecules have been found. Earliest proposed dates for the origin of cheesemaking range from around 8,000 BCE, when sheep were first domesticated. Since animal skins and inflated internal organs have, since ancient times, provided storage vessels for a range of foodstuffs, it is probable that the process of cheese making was discovered accidentally by storing milk in a container made from the stomach of an animal, resulting in the milk being turned to curd and whey by the rennet from the stomach. There is a legend, with variations, about the discovery of cheese by an Arab trader who used this method of storing milk.

    Cheesemaking may have begun independently of this by the pressing and salting of curdled milk to preserve it. Observation that the effect of making cheese in an animal stomach gave more solid and better-textured curds may have led to the deliberate addition of rennet.

    Early archeological evidence of Egyptian cheese has been found in Egyptian tomb murals, dating to about 2,000 BCE. The earliest cheeses were likely to have been quite sour and salty, similar in texture to rustic cottage cheese or feta, a crumbly, flavorful Greek cheese.

    Cheese produced in Europe, where climates are cooler than the Middle East, required less salt for preservation. With less salt and acidity, the cheese became a suitable environment for useful microbes and molds, giving aged cheeses their respective flavors.

    The earliest ever discovered preserved cheese was found in the Taklamakan Desert in Xinjiang, China, and it dates back as early as 1615 BCE.

    ANCIENT GREECE & ROME

    Ancient Greek mythology credited Aristaeus with the discovery of cheese. Homer's Odyssey (8th century BCE) describes the Cyclops making and storing sheep's and goats' milk cheese (translation by Samuel Butler):
      We soon reached his cave, but he was out shepherding, so we went inside and took stock of all that we could see. His cheese-racks were loaded with cheeses, and he had more lambs and kids than his pens could hold...

      When he had so done he sat down and milked his ewes and goats, all in due course, and then let each of them have her own young. He curdled half the milk and set it aside in wicker strainers.

    By Roman times, cheese was an everyday food and cheesemaking a mature art. Columella's De Re Rustica (circa 65 CE) details a cheesemaking process involving rennet coagulation, pressing of the curd, salting, and aging. Pliny's Natural History (77 CE) devotes a chapter (XI, 97) to describing the diversity of cheeses enjoyed by Romans of the early Empire. He stated that the best cheeses came from the villages near Nîmes, but did not keep long and had to be eaten fresh. Cheeses of the Alps and Apennines were as remarkable for their variety then as now. A Ligurian cheese was noted for being made mostly from sheep's milk, and some cheeses produced nearby were stated to weigh as much as a thousand pounds each. Goats' milk cheese was a recent taste in Rome, improved over the "medicinal taste" of Gaul's similar cheeses by smoking. Of cheeses from overseas, Pliny preferred those of Bithynia in Asia Minor.

    POST-ROMAN EUROPE

    As Romanized populations encountered unfamiliar newly settled neighbors, bringing their own cheese-making traditions, their own flocks and their own unrelated words for cheese, cheeses in Europe diversified further, with various locales developing their own distinctive traditions and products. As long-distance trade collapsed, only travelers would encounter unfamiliar cheeses: Charlemagne's first encounter with a white cheese that had an edible rind forms one of the constructed anecdotes of Notker's Life of the Emperor.

    The British Cheese Board claims that Britain has approximately 700 distinct local cheeses; France and Italy have perhaps 400 each. (A French proverb holds there is a different French cheese for every day of the year, and Charles de Gaulle once asked "how can you govern a country in which there are 246 kinds of cheese?") Still, the advancement of the cheese art in Europe was slow during the centuries after Rome's fall. Many cheeses today were first recorded in the late Middle Ages or after. Cheeses like Cheddar around 1500, Parmesan in 1597, Gouda in 1697, and Camembert in 1791.

    In 1546 The Proverbs of John Heywood claimed "the moon is made of a greene cheese." (Greene may refer here not to the color, as many now think, but to being new or unaged.) Variations on this sentiment were long repeated and NASA exploited this myth for an April Fools' Day spoof announcement in 2006.

    MODERN ERA

    Until its modern spread along with European culture, cheese was nearly unheard of in east Asian cultures, in the pre-Columbian Americas, and only had limited use in sub-Mediterranean Africa, mainly being widespread and popular only in Europe, the Middle East, the Indian subcontinent, and areas influenced by those cultures. But with the spread, first of European imperialism, and later of Euro-American culture and food, cheese has gradually become known and increasingly popular worldwide, though still rarely considered a part of local ethnic cuisines outside Europe, the Middle East, the Indian subcontinent, and the Americas.

    The first factory for the industrial production of cheese opened in Switzerland in 1815, but large-scale production first found real success in the United States. Credit usually goes to Jesse Williams, a dairy farmer from Rome, New York, who in 1851 started making cheese in an assembly-line fashion using the milk from neighboring farms. Within decades, hundreds of such dairy associations existed.

    The 1860s saw the beginnings of mass-produced rennet, and by the turn of the century scientists were producing pure microbial cultures. Before then, bacteria in cheesemaking had come from the environment or from recycling an earlier batch's whey; the pure cultures meant a more standardized cheese could be produced. Factory-made cheese overtook traditional cheesemaking in the World War II era, and factories have been the source of most cheese in America and Europe ever since.





    CHEESE PRODUCTION

    THE ART OF CHEESE-MAKING

    CURDLING

    A required step in cheesemaking is separating the milk into solid curds and liquid whey. Usually this is done by acidifying (souring) the milk and adding rennet. The acidification can be accomplished directly by the addition of an acid, such as vinegar, in a few cases (paneer, queso fresco). More commonly starter bacteria are employed instead which convert milk sugars into lactic acid. The same bacteria (and the enzymes they produce) also play a large role in the eventual flavor of aged cheeses. Most cheeses are made with starter bacteria from the Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, or Streptococcus families. Swiss starter cultures also include Propionibacter shermani, which produces carbon dioxide gas bubbles during aging, giving Swiss cheese or Emmental its holes (called "eyes").

    Some fresh cheeses are curdled only by acidity, but most cheeses also use rennet. Rennet sets the cheese into a strong and rubbery gel compared to the fragile curds produced by acidic coagulation alone. It also allows curdling at a lower acidity. This is important because flavor-making bacteria are inhibited in high-acidity environments. In general, softer, smaller, fresher cheeses are curdled with a greater proportion of acid to rennet than harder, larger, longer-aged varieties.

    While rennet was traditionally produced via extraction from the inner mucosa of the fourth stomach chamber of slaughtered young, unweaned calves, most rennet used today in cheesemaking is produced recombinantly. The majority of the applied chymosin is retained in the whey and, at most, may be present in cheese in trace quantities. In ripe cheese, the type and provenance of chymosin used in production cannot be determined.


    RENNET
    Wikipedia: Rennet

    Rennet is a complex of enzymes produced in the stomachs of ruminant mammals. Chymosin, its key component, is a protease enzyme that curdles the casein in milk. This helps young mammals digest their mothers' milk. Rennet can also be used to separate milk into solid curds for cheese making and liquid whey. In addition to chymosin, rennet contains other important enzymes such as pepsin and a lipase. Rennet is used in the production of most cheeses. The mammal must be killed to obtain its rennet. Non-animal alternatives for rennet are suitable for consumption by vegetarians.

    PRODUCTION OF NATURAL CALF RENNET

    Natural calf rennet is extracted from the inner mucosa of the fourth stomach chamber (the abomasum) of harvested young, unweaned calves. These stomachs are a byproduct of veal production. If rennet is extracted from older calves (grass-fed or grain-fed), the rennet contains less or no chymosin, but a high level of pepsin and can only be used for special types of milk and cheeses. As each ruminant produces a special kind of rennet to digest the milk of its own species, milk-specific rennets are available, such as kid goat rennet for goat's milk and lamb rennet for sheep's milk.

    TRADITIONAL METHOD

    Dried and cleaned stomachs of young calves are sliced into small pieces and then put into salt water or whey, together with some vinegar or wine to lower the pH of the solution. After some time (overnight or several days), the solution is filtered. The crude rennet that remains in the filtered solution can then be used to coagulate milk. About 1 gram of this solution can normally coagulate 2 to 4 Liters of milk.

    MODERN METHOD

    Deep-frozen stomachs are milled and put into an enzyme-extracting solution. The crude rennet extract is then activated by adding acid; the enzymes in the stomach are produced in an inactive form and are activated by the stomach acid. The acid is then neutralized and the rennet extract is filtered in several stages and concentrated until reaching a typical potency of about 1:15,000; meaning 1 gram of extract can coagulate 15 kilograms of milk. One kilogram of rennet extract has about 0.7 grams of active enzymes. The rest is water and salt and sometimes sodium benzoate (E211), 0.5 to 1.0-percent for preservation. Typically, 1 kilogram of cheese contains about 0.0003 grams of rennet enzymes.

    ALTERNATIVE SOURCES OF RENNET

    Because of the limited availability of mammalian stomachs for rennet production, cheese makers have looked for other ways to coagulate the milk since at least Roman times. The many sources of enzymes that can be a substitute for animal rennet range from plants and fungi to microbial sources. Cheeses produced from any of these varieties of rennet are suitable for lactovegetarians to consume. Fermentation-produced chymosin is used more often in industrial cheesemaking in North America and Europe today because it is less expensive than animal rennet.

    VEGETABLE RENNET

    Many plants have coagulating properties. Homer suggests in the Iliad that the Greeks used an extract of fig juice to coagulate milk. Other examples include dried caper leaves, nettles, thistles, mallow, and Ground Ivy (Creeping Charlie). Enzymes from thistle or Cynara are used in some traditional cheese production in the Mediterranean. Phytic acid, derived from unfermented soybeans, or fermentation-produced chymosin (FPC) may also be used. Vegetable rennets are also suitable for vegetarians. Vegetable rennet might be used in the production of kosher and halal cheeses, but nearly all kosher cheeses are produced with either microbial rennet or FPC. Commercial so-called vegetable rennets usually contain rennet from the mold Mucor miehei.

    MICROBIAL RENNET

    Some molds such as Rhizomucor miehei are able to produce proteolytic enzymes. These molds are produced in a fermenter and then specially concentrated and purified to avoid contamination with unpleasant byproducts of the mold growth. The flavor and taste of cheeses produced with microbial rennets tend towards some bitterness, especially after longer maturation periods. Cheeses produced this way are suitable for vegetarians, provided no animal-based alimentation was used during the production.

    FERMENTATION-PRODUCED CHYMOSIN (FPC)

    Because of the above imperfections of microbial and animal rennets, many producers sought further replacements of rennet. With the development of genetic engineering, it became possible to extract rennet-producing genes from animal stomach and insert them into certain bacteria, fungi, or yeasts to make them produce chymosin during fermentation. The genetically modified microorganism is killed after fermentation and chymosin isolated from the fermentation broth, so that the fermentation-produced chymosin (FPC) used by cheese producers does not contain any GM component or ingredient. FPC is identical to chymosin made by an animal, but is produced in a more efficient way. FPC products have been on the market since 1990 and have been considered in the last 20 years the ideal milk-clotting enzyme.

    FPC was the first artificially produced enzyme to be registered and allowed by the US Food and Drug Administration. In 1999, about 60-percent of US hard cheeses were made with FPC, and it has up to 80-percent of the global market share for rennet. By 2008, about 80 to 90-percent of commercially made cheeses in the US and Britain were made using FPC. Today, the most widely used FPC is produced either by the fungus Aspergillus niger and commercialized under the trademark CHY-MAX® by the Danish company Chr. Hansen, or produced by Kluyveromyces lactis and commercialized under the trademark MAXIREN® by the Dutch company DSM.

    FPC is chymosin B, so is more pure compared with animal rennet, which contains a multitude of proteins. FPC can deliver several benefits to the cheese producer compared with animal or microbial rennet, such as higher production yield, better curd texture, and reduced bitterness.

    NONRENNET COAGULATION

    Many soft cheeses are produced without use of rennet, by coagulating milk with acid, such as citric acid or vinegar, or the lactic acid produced by soured milk. Cream cheese, paneer, and rubing are traditionally made this way. The acidification can also come from bacterial fermentation such as in cultured milk.


    CURD PROCESSING

    At this point, the cheese has set into a very moist gel. Some soft cheeses are now essentially complete: they are drained, salted, and packaged. For most of the rest, the curd is cut into small cubes. This allows water to drain from the individual pieces of curd.

    Some hard cheeses are then heated to temperatures in the range of 95 to 131°F. This forces more whey from the cut curd. It also changes the taste of the finished cheese, affecting both the bacterial culture and the milk chemistry. Cheeses that are heated to the higher temperatures are usually made with thermophilic starter bacteria that survive this step -- either Lactobacilli or Streptococci.

    Salt has roles in cheese besides adding a salty flavor. It preserves cheese from spoiling, draws moisture from the curd, and firms cheese’s texture in an interaction with its proteins. Some cheeses are salted from the outside with dry salt or brine washes. Most cheeses have the salt mixed directly into the curds.

    Other techniques influence a cheese's texture and flavor. Some examples are :
    • Stretching: (Mozzarella, Provolone) The curd is stretched and kneaded in hot water, developing a stringy, fibrous body.
    • Cheddaring: (Cheddar, other English cheeses) The cut curd is repeatedly piled up, pushing more moisture away. The curd is also mixed (or milled) for a long time, taking the sharp edges off the cut curd pieces and influencing the final product's texture.
    • Washing: (Edam, Gouda, Colby) The curd is washed in warm water, lowering its acidity and making for a milder-tasting cheese.
    Most cheeses achieve their final shape when the curds are pressed into a mold or form. The harder the cheese, the more pressure is applied. The pressure drives out moisture. The molds are designed to allow water to escape and unifies the curds into a single solid body.

    RIPENING

    A newborn cheese is usually salty yet bland in flavor and, for harder varieties, rubbery in texture (referred to as "squeaky cheese" because they make little squeaky sounds when chewed). These qualities are sometimes enjoyed -- cheese curds are eaten on their own, but normally cheeses are left to rest under controlled conditions. This aging period (also called ripening, or, from the French, affinage) lasts from a few days to several years. As a cheese ages, microbes and enzymes transform texture and intensify flavor. This transformation is largely a result of the breakdown of casein proteins and milkfat into a complex mix of amino acids, amines, and fatty acids.

  • Homemade Squeaky Cheese Curds Recipe & Instructions

  • Some cheeses have additional bacteria or molds intentionally introduced before or during aging. In traditional cheesemaking, these microbes might be already present in the aging room; they are simply allowed to settle and grow on the stored cheeses. More often today, prepared cultures are used, giving more consistent results and putting fewer constraints on the environment where the cheese ages. These cheeses include soft ripened cheeses such as Brie and Camembert, blue cheeses such as Roquefort, Stilton, Gorgonzola, and rind-washed cheeses such as Limburger.





    TYPES OF CHEESES

    There are many types of cheese, with around 500 different varieties recognized by the International Dairy Federation, more than 400 identified by Walter and Hargrove, more than 500 by Burkhalter, and more than 1,000 by Sandine and Elliker. The varieties may be grouped or classified into types according to criteria such as length of ageing, texture, methods of making, fat content, animal milk, country or region of origin, etc. -- with these criteria either being used singly or in combination, but with no single method being universally used. The method most commonly and traditionally used is based on moisture content, which is then further discriminated by fat content and curing or ripening methods. Some attempts have been made to rationalize the classification of cheese -- a scheme was proposed by Pieter Walstra which uses the primary and secondary starter combined with moisture content, and Walter and Hargrove suggested classifying by production methods which produces 18 types, which are then further grouped by moisture content.

    MOISTURE CONTENT (SOFT TO HARD)

    Categorizing cheeses by firmness is a common but inexact practice. The lines between "soft", "semi-soft", "semi-hard", and "hard" are arbitrary, and many types of cheese are made in softer or firmer variations. The main factor that controls cheese hardness is moisture content, which depends largely on the pressure with which it is packed into molds, and on aging time.

    FRESH, WHEY & STRETCHED CURD CHEESES

    The main factor in the categorization of these cheeses is their age. Fresh cheeses without additional preservatives can spoil in a matter of days.

    CONTENT (DOUBLE CREAM, GOAT, EWE, & WATER BUFFALO)

    Some cheeses are categorized by the source of the milk used to produce them or by the added fat content of the milk from which they are produced. While most of the world's commercially available cheese is made from cows' milk, many parts of the world also produce cheese from goats and sheep. Double cream cheeses are soft cheeses of cows' milk enriched with cream so that their fat content is 60-percent or, in the case of triple creams, 75-percent. The use of the terms "double" or "triple" is not meant to give a quantitative reference to the change in fat content, since the fat content of whole cows' milk is 3 to 4-percent.

    SOFT-RIPENED & BLUE-VEIN

    There are at least three main categories of cheese in which the presence of mold is a significant feature: soft ripened cheeses, washed rind cheeses and blue cheeses.

    PROCESSED CHEESES

    Processed cheese is made from traditional cheese and emulsifying salts, often with the addition of milk, more salt, preservatives, and food coloring. It is inexpensive, consistent, and melts smoothly. It is sold packaged and either pre-sliced or unsliced, in a number of varieties. It is also available in aerosol cans in some countries. Cheese can be obtained in powdered form for long term storage and reconstituted by adding water or milk to make a sauce or dip.





    CULINARY USE & NUTRITION

    EATING & COOKING

    At refrigerator temperatures, the fat in a piece of cheese is as hard as unsoftened butter, and its protein structure is stiff as well. Flavor and odor compounds are less easily liberated when cold. For improvements in flavor and texture, it is widely advised that cheeses be allowed to warm up to room temperature before eating. If the cheese is further warmed, to 79 to 90°F, the fats will begin to "sweat out" as they go beyond soft to fully liquid.

    Above room temperatures, most hard cheeses melt. Rennet-curdled cheeses have a gel-like protein matrix that is broken down by heat. When enough protein bonds are broken, the cheese itself turns from a solid to a viscous liquid. Soft, high-moisture cheeses will melt at around 131°F, while hard, low-moisture cheeses such as Parmesan remain solid until they reach about 180°F. Acid-set cheeses, including halloumi, paneer, some whey cheeses and many varieties of fresh goat cheese, have a protein structure that remains intact at high temperatures. When cooked, these cheeses just get firmer as water evaporates.

    Some cheeses, like raclette, melt smoothly; many tend to become stringy or suffer from a separation of their fats. Many of these can be coaxed into melting smoothly in the presence of acids or starch. Fondue, with wine providing the acidity, is a good example of a smoothly melted cheese dish. Elastic stringiness is a quality that is sometimes enjoyed, in dishes including pizza and Welsh rarebit. Even a melted cheese eventually turns solid again, after enough moisture is cooked off. The saying "you can't melt cheese twice" (meaning "some things can only be done once") refers to the fact that oils leach out during the first melting and are gone, leaving the non-meltable solids behind.

    As its temperature continues to rise, cheese will brown and eventually burn. Browned, partially burned cheese has a particular distinct flavor of its own and is frequently used in cooking (e.g., sprinkling atop items before baking them).

    HEALTH & NUTRITION

    The nutritional value of cheese varies widely:
    • Cottage cheese may consist of 4-percent fat and 11-percent protein.
    • Some whey cheeses may consist of 15-percent fat and 11-percent protein.
    • Some triple-crème cheeses may consist of 36-percent fat and 7-percent protein.
    In general, cheese supplies a great deal of calcium, protein, phosphorus and fat. A 30-gram (1.1 ounce ) serving of Cheddar cheese contains about 7 grams (0.25 ounce) of protein and 200 milligrams of calcium. Nutritionally, cheese is essentially concentrated milk: it takes about 200 grams (7.1 ounces) of milk to provide that much protein, and 150 grams (5.3 ounces) to equal the calcium.


    MACRONUTRIENTS (Grams) of COMMON CHEESES
    Per 100 Grams
    CHEESE
    WATER
    PROTEIN
    FAT
    CARBS
    Swiss
    37.1
    26.9
    27.8
    5.4
    Feta
    55.2
    14.2
    21.3
    4.1
    Cheddar
    36.8
    24.9
    33.1
    1.3
    Mozzarella
    50
    22.2
    22.4
    2.2
    Cottage
    80
    11.1
    4.3
    3.4


    VITAMIN CONTENTS (%DV) of COMMON CHEESES
    Per 100 Grams
    CHEESE
    A
    B-1
    B-2
    B-3
    B-5
    B-6
    B-9
    B-12
    Choline
    C
    D
    E
    K
    Swiss
    17
    4
    17
    0
    4
    4
    1
    56
    2.8
    0
    11
    2
    3
    Feta
    8
    10
    50
    5
    10
    21
    8
    28
    2.2
    0
    0
    1
    2
    Cheddar
    20
    2
    22
    0
    4
    4
    5
    14
    3
    0
    3
    1
    3
    Mozzarella
    14
    2
    17
    1
    1
    2
    2
    38
    2.8
    0
    0
    1
    3
    Cottage
    3
    2
    10
    0
    6
    2
    3
    7
    3.3
    0
    0
    0
    0


    MINERAL CONTENTS (%DV) of COMMON CHEESES
    Per 100 Grams
    CHEESE
    Ca
    Fe
    Mg
    P
    K
    Na
    Zn
    Cu
    Mn
    Se
    Swiss
    79
    10
    1
    57
    2
    8
    29
    2
    0
    26
    Feta
    49
    4
    5
    34
    2
    46
    19
    2
    1
    21
    Cheddar
    72
    4
    7
    51
    3
    26
    21
    2
    1
    20
    Mozzarella
    51
    2
    5
    35
    2
    26
    19
    1
    1
    24
    Cottage
    8
    0
    2
    16
    3
    15
    3
    1
    0
    14

    Ca - Calcium, Fe - Iron, Mg - Magnesium, P - Phosphorus, K - Potassium
    Na - Sodium, Zn - Zinc, Cu - Copper, Mn - Manganese, Se - Selenium

    Note: All nutrient values including protein are in %DV per 100 grams of the food item except for Macronutrients.
    Source: Nutritiondata.self.com





    CHEESE SAFETY, CAUTIONS & INTERACTIONS

    HEART DISEASE

    A review of the medical literature published in 2012 noted that: "Cheese consumption is the leading contributor of SF (saturated fat) in the U.S. diet, and therefore would be predicted to increase LDL-C (LDL cholesterol) and consequently increase the risk of CVD (cardiovascular disease)." It found that: "Based on results from numerous prospective observational studies and meta-analyses, most, but not all, have shown no association and in some cases an inverse relationship between the intake of milk fat containing dairy products and the risk of CVD, CHD (coronary heart disease), and stroke. A limited number of prospective cohort studies found no significant association between the intake of total full-fat dairy products and the risk of CHD or stroke. Most clinical studies showed that full-fat natural cheese, a highly fermented product, significantly lowers LDL-C compared with butter intake of equal total fat and saturated fat content."

    DENTAL HEALTH

    Some studies claim that cheddar, mozzarella, and Swiss and American cheeses can help to prevent tooth decay. Several mechanisms for this protection have been proposed: The calcium, protein, and phosphorus in cheese may act to protect tooth enamel. Cheese increases saliva flow, washing away acids and sugars.

    CASEIN

    Like other dairy products, cheese contains casein, a substance that, when digested by humans, breaks down into several chemicals, including casomorphine, an opioid peptide. In the early 1990s, it was hypothesized that autism can be caused or aggravated by opioid peptides. Studies supporting these claims have shown significant flaws, so the data are inadequate to guide autism treatment recommendations.

    LACTOSE

    Cheese is often avoided by those who are lactose intolerant, but ripened cheeses like Cheddar contain only about 5-percent of the lactose found in whole milk, and aged cheeses contain almost none. Nevertheless, people with severe lactose intolerance should avoid eating dairy cheese. As a natural product, the same kind of cheese may contain different amounts of lactose on different occasions, causing unexpected painful reactions.

    HYPERTENSIVE EFFECT

    Patients taking antidepressant drugs in the class of monoamine oxidase inhibitors are at risk from suffering a reaction to foods containing large amounts of tyramine. Some aged cheeses contain significant concentrations of tyramine, which can trigger symptoms mimicking an allergic reaction: headaches, rashes, and blood pressure elevations.

    PASTEURIZATION

    A number of food safety agencies around the world have warned of the risks of raw-milk cheeses. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration states that soft raw-milk cheeses can cause "serious infectious diseases including listeriosis, brucellosis, salmonellosis and tuberculosis". It is U.S. law since 1944 that all raw-milk cheeses (including imports since 1951) must be aged at least 60 days. Australia has a wide ban on raw-milk cheeses as well, though in recent years exceptions have been made for Swiss Gruyere, Emmental and Sbrinz, and for French Roquefort. There is a trend for cheeses to be pasteurized even when not required by law.

    Compulsory pasteurization is controversial. Pasteurization does change the flavor of cheeses, and unpasteurized cheeses are often considered to have better flavor, so there are reasons not to pasteurize all cheeses. Some say that health concerns are overstated, or that milk pasteurization does not ensure cheese safety.

    Pregnant women may face an additional risk from cheese; the U.S. Centers for Disease Control has warned pregnant women against eating soft-ripened cheeses and blue-veined cheeses, due to the listeria risk, which can cause miscarriage or harm to the fetus during birth.


    INFORMATION SOURCE

    Wikipedia: Cheese





    cheese powder


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  • Cheese Dairy Products
  • Colostrum Supplement Products
  • Egg Dairy Products


  • Goats Milk Dairy Products
  • Milk Dairy Products
  • Sour Cream Dairy Products
  • Sweet Cream Dairy Products
  • Whey Dairy Products
  • Yogurt Dairy Products


  • QUALITY PRODUCTS & SUPPLEMENTS


    FTC Advertising & Affilate Disclosure: This website has an affiliate relationship with certain merchants selling products and we recieve commissions from those sales to help support this website. Any products listed here are not listed by any rating system. We do not rate any product or post any feedback about products listed here. We leave this to the individual merchants to provide. We do not provide product prices or shopping carts since you do not order these products directly from us, but from the merchant providing the products. We only provide the link to that merchant webpage with all related product information and pricing. The products are listed here by merchant, product use, quantity size or volume, and for nutritional supplements - dosage per unit. All product descriptions are provided by the merchant or manufacturer and are not our descriptive review of the product. We do not endorse any specific product or attest to its effectiveness to treat any health condition or support nutritional requirements for any individual.


    BUTTER DAIRY PRODUCTS

    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Butter Powder (Cream & Salt, Dry Buttermilk), Frontier Foods, 1 lb: K
    Dehydrated butter powder (butter, sweet cream buttermilk and annatto).


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Butter Grocery & Gourmet Food Products
    Amazon: Butter Powder Grocery & Gourmet Food Products



  • Nutrition Basics: Dairy Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Cheese Powder Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Buttermilk Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Goats Milk Information



  • BUTTERMILK DAIRY PRODUCTS

    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbsPro: Buttermilk Powder, Now Foods, 14 oz
    An excellent leavening agent, a source of protein and calcium, low in fat, and mixes easily for rich creamy taste, This is a pure and natural product of sweet cream buttermilk powder. To make buttermilk pancakes, follow directions on any pancake mix and substitute reconstituted buttermilk liquid for milk in the recipe. To reconstitute into buttermilk, blend 1/4 cup of powder into a 10 ounce glass of water.


    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Buttermilk Powder, Frontier Foods, 1 lb: K
    This is Frontier’s double wall silverfoil pack. Some Frontier packs are double wall wax-lined paper. Just reconstitute with water for delicious buttermilk. Add 4 tablespoons buttermilk powder to 1 cup cold water. Mix well and use as you would fresh buttermilk. Makes 1 cup.
    Kalyx: Buttermilk Powder, Starwest Botanicals, 1 lb: C
    Kalyx: Sweet Cream Buttermilk, Dutch Valley, 10 lb: GR
    Sweet Cream Buttermilk solids can be used in place of liquid buttermilk or sour milk in any recipe. Use this powdered milk in pancake, bread, waffle, biscuit and ice cream recipes. Eachcase consists of ten pounds. To reconstitute, mix 3 cups Sweet Cream Buttermilk Solids powder plus 3.75 quarts water. Makes 1 gallon liquid buttermilk.
    Kalyx: Sweet Cream Buttermilk, All American Dairy Products, 50 lb: GR
    Sweet Cream Buttermilk solids can be used in place of liquid buttermilk or sour milk in any recipe. Use this powdered milk in pancake, bread, waffle, biscuit and ice cream recipes. Each case consists of fifty pounds. Sweet Cream Buttermilk Solids, 3 cups powder, plus 3.75 quarts water. Makes 1 gallon liquid buttermilk.
    Kalyx: Ranch Dip & Dressing Mix, Certified Organic, Frontier Foods, 1 lb: K
    Just add water or milk, or stir into cream cheese.
    Kalyx: Ranch Buttermilk Dressing Mix, Dutch Valley, 5 lb: GR
    Ranch Dressing mix is a traditional mix that has grown to be a staple in every kitchen. This mix is flavored with sweet cream buttermilk, garlic, and sour cream and onion powder. This well seasoned, creamy mix can be prepared for use as a salad dressing or can be made thicker for dipping with vegetables, chips and crackers. Each case consists of five pounds. For Ranch Dressing: Mix 3/4 cup Water and 2 1/4 cups Mayonnaise. Whisk the water and mayonnaise together. Add 1/2 cup Ranch Dressing Mix and whisk; let set for 10 minutes. Serve. For Ranch Dip, take 1/2 cup Ranch Dressing Mix and 16 ounces Sour Cream. Whisk together and let set for 10 minutes. Serve.


    AMAZON PRODUCTS - BUTTERMILK POWDER

    Amazon: Buttermilk Powder Grocery & Gourmet Food Products



  • Nutrition Basics: Dairy Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Cheese Powder Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Buttermilk Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Goats Milk Information



  • CHEESE DAIRY FOOD PRODUCTS

    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Cheese Powder - White Cheddar, Organic, Frontier, 1 lb: K
    This is Frontier’s double wall silverfoil pack. Some Frontier packs are double wall wax-lined paper. Delicious, nutritious and versatile! Normal 0 Organic cheddar cheese (cultured organic milk, salt, microbial enzymes), organic nonfat milk, organic whey, salt, disodium phosphate.
    Kalyx: Cheese Powder - Mild Cheddar, Frontier, 1 lb: K
    This is Frontier’s double wall silverfoil pack. Some Frontier packs are double wall wax-lined paper. Delicious, nutritious and versatile! Cheddar cheese (cultured milk, salt, enzymes, annatto extract), buttermilk powder, salt, soy lecithin.
    Kalyx: Pop N Season Cheddar Cheese Popcorn Seasoning, Frontier Spices, 1 lb: K
    This is Frontier’s double wall silverfoil pack. Some Frontier packs are double wall wax-lined paper. Sharp cheddar cheese powder (aged cheddar cheese (cultured milk, salt, enzymes), partially hydrogenated soybean oil, buttermilk, salt, sodium phosphate, citric acid, lactic acid, annatto color), white cheddar cheese (cheddar cheese (milk, salt, cheese cultures, enzymes), disodium phosphate, salt, lactic acid), inactive dried yeast and yeast extract.
    Kalyx: Smoked Cheddar Powder, Bulk Foods Inc, 5 lb: GR
    With its distinctive smoky taste, this cheese powder is a great addition to snacks and side dishes— sprinkle it on your popcorn or pretzels, or use it to top baked potatoes, fries, pastas, and salads. Each case contains five pounds.
    Kalyx: Cheese Powder - Cheddar Cheez, Dutch Valley, 10 lbs: GR
    Description Add the delicious taste of cheddar cheese to your snacks with this Cheddease powder. Perfect for sprinkling on popcorn, pretzels or any snack you desire, this cheddar cheese powder is also useful for baked potatoes, pastas and salads.
    Kalyx: Parmesan Cheese Powder, Contains Milk, Certified Organic, Kalyx, 50 lbs (22.73 kg): CO
    Kalyx: Cheddar Cheese Sauce Mix, Southeastern Mills, 2.75 oz. (Case of 24): GR
    Cheddar Cheese sauce can be served over your favorite macaroni noodles for a classic macaroni and cheese dish. Try this sauce in casseroles, served over potatoes, fresh steamed vegetables or even over rice. Each case consists of twenty four, two and three quarter ounce packs.
    Kalyx: Creamy Cheese Sauce Mix, Dutch Valley, 10 lb: GR
    Use this Creamy Cheese Sauce on anything from appetizers to pasta. Creamy Cheese sauce is great with nachos and your favorite salsa. Try mixing a generous helping of this sauce with your favorite pasta shapes for easy and delicious kid-friendly macaroni and cheese. Drizzle over your baked potatoes or French fries for restaurant style appetizers in the comfort of your own home. Each case consists of ten pounds.
    Kalyx: Nacho Cheese Dip Mix, Dutch Valley, 5 lb: GR
    Nacho Cheese Dip Mix is carefully created with a blend of cheddar cheese, chili and jalapeno pepper to make the perfect party dip. This dip is loaded with the just right amount of vegetables, spices and cheese. Try adding some nacho cheese dip, sour cream and bacon pieces to your next serving of French fries to easily create a perfect batch of loaded fries. Each case consists of five pounds.
    Kalyx: Blue Cheese Dip & Dressing Mix, Dutch Valley, 5 lb: GR
    Blue Cheese Dip has the creamy taste of blue cheese that will add the just right bite to anything you can think of! Add cream cheese and sour cream to the mix to create a delicious, balanced blue cheese dip for vegetables, chips and pretzels. Try using this dip on salad greens and potatoes, sprinkled over popcorn, or mix it with ricotta or cottage cheese and add a layer into your next lasagna. Each case consists of five pounds.
    Kalyx: Grated Parmesan Cheese, JVM Sales, 5 lb: GR
    Grated Parmesan Cheese will add the taste of fresh cheese to your dishes. This cheese is perfect for sprinkling on pasta dishes, potatoes, salads and vegetables. Each case consists of five pounds.
    Kalyx: Grated Parmesan Cheese, JVM Sales, 5 lb (Case of 4): GR
    Grated Parmesan Cheese will add the taste of fresh cheese to your dishes. This cheese is perfect for sprinkling on pasta dishes, potatoes, salads and vegetables. Each case consists of four, five pounds.
    Kalyx: Redi-Pak Cream Cheese, Henry & Henry, 2 lb Pack (Case of 12)
    Redi-Pak Cream Cheese is a filling perfect for pies, pastries and other baked goods. Each case consists of twelve, two pound bags.


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Cheese Grocery & Gourmet Food Products
    Amazon: Cheese Powder Products



  • Nutrition Basics: Dairy Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Cheese Powder Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Buttermilk Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Goats Milk Information



  • EGG DAIRY PRODUCTS

    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Egg Powder, Certified Organic, Frontier Foods, 1 lb: K
    This is Frontier’s double wall silverfoil pack. Some Frontier packs are double wall wax-lined paper. Pure dried egg powder, for recipes, and for quick and easy scrambled eggs anywhere. 4 cups per pound. 1 cup equals 16 tablespoons. 2 tablespoons per egg. 32 eggs per pound.
    Kalyx: Egg White Solids, Dutch Valley, 5 lb: GR
    Egg white solids are great for use in bakeries and are an economical way to incorporate eggs into your recipe without the threat of spoilage. Egg white solids have a fairly long shelf life when kept in a sealed package and stored in a cool area. They absorb moisture easily, making them a no hassle ingredient in any baked good recipe. Each case consists of five pounds.
    Kalyx: Egg White Solids, Henningsen Foods, 50 lb: GR
    Egg white solids are great for use in bakeries and are an economical way to incorporate eggs into your recipe without the threat of spoilage. Egg white solids have a fairly long shelf life when kept in a sealed package and stored in a cool area. They absorb moisture easily, making them a no hassle ingredient in any baked good recipe. Each case consists of fifty pounds.
    Kalyx: Whole Egg Solids, Henningsen Foods, 50 lb: GR
    Whole egg solids are great for use in bakeries and are an economical way to incorporate eggs into your recipe without the threat of spoilage. Egg solids have a fairly long shelf life when kept in a sealed package and stored in a cool area. Whole egg solids absorb moisture easily, making them a no hassle ingredient in any baked good recipe. Each case consists of fifty pounds.


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Whole Eggs & Egg Grocery & Gourmet Food Products
    Amazon: Egg Powder Grocery & Gourmet Food Products



  • Nutrition Basics: Dairy Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Cheese Powder Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Buttermilk Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Goats Milk Information



  • MILK DAIRY & RELATED PRODUCTS

    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbsPro: Lactose Milk Sugar, Now Foods, 1 lb
    Always Natural. Always Real. Assist in the Growth of Beneficial Gut Bacteria. Extract of Sweet & Sour Whey. Naturally Sweet. Same Great Taste. Brand New Look.
    HerbsPro: Bioactive Milk Peptides, Life Extension, 150 mg, 30 caps
    Bioactive Milk Peptides (Lactium) are a cutting-edge nutrient complex consisting of patented bioactive peptides (Casein decapeptide) found naturally in milk. Used widely in Europe to promote sustained and restful sleep patterns, published studies reveal that these bioactive milk peptides also promote relaxation.
    HerbsPro: Milk & Egg Protein Powder, Universal Nutrition, 1.5 Lb
    Milk & Egg Protein is a formulation for serious bodybuilders and competitive athletes delivering a low-fat, high protein powder with essential nutrients to help enhance protein synthesis, increase muscle mass, and reduce body fat.
    HerbsPro: Complete Milk Digestant, Malabar Formulations, 30 Tabs
    A dietary supplement containing natural Lactase Enzyme (100 mg), natural Protease Enzyme Concentrate (10 mg), natural Lipase Enzyme Concentrate (10 mg) and natural Rennin (5 mg) used as an aid in the digestion of milk products. Adults, take one tablet with or before consuming milk or dairy products, or as directed by your healthcare professional. Two tablets may be used if needed. The amount of enzyme deficiency for Lactase, Protease, Lipase and Rennin and their activity level vary with each individual and foods. You may have to adjust the level of tablets up or down to find your own comfort level.
    HerbsPro: Complete Milk Digestant, Malabar Formulations, 60 Tabs
    A dietary supplement containing natural Lactase Enzyme (100 mg), natural Protease Enzyme Concentrate (10 mg), natural Lipase Enzyme Concentrate (10 mg) and natural Rennin (5 mg) used as an aid in the digestion of milk products. Adults, take one tablet with or before consuming milk or dairy products, or as directed by your healthcare professional. Two tablets may be used if needed. The amount of enzyme deficiency for Lactase, Protease, Lipase and Rennin and their activity level vary with each individual and foods. You may have to adjust the level of tablets up or down to find your own comfort level.
    HerbsPro: Complete Milk Digestant, Malabar Formulations, 90 Tabs
    A dietary supplement containing natural Lactase Enzyme (100 mg), natural Protease Enzyme Concentrate (10 mg), natural Lipase Enzyme Concentrate (10 mg) and natural Rennin (5 mg) used as an aid in the digestion of milk products. Adults, take one tablet with or before consuming milk or dairy products, or as directed by your healthcare professional. Two tablets may be used if needed. The amount of enzyme deficiency for Lactase, Protease, Lipase and Rennin and their activity level vary with each individual and foods. You may have to adjust the level of tablets up or down to find your own comfort level.
    HerbsPro: Super Milk Digestant, Malabar Formulations, 50 Tabs
    HerbsPro: Super Milk Digestant, Malabar Formulations, 100 Tabs
    HerbsPro: Super Milk Digestant, Malabar Formulations 150 Tabs
    HerbsPro: Super Milk Digestant, Malabar Formulations 250 Tabs
    A dietary supplement containing natural Lactase Enzyme (50 mg) and natural Rennin (4 mg) used as an aid in the digestion of milk products.Adults, take one tablet with or before consuming milk or dairy products, or as directed by your healthcare professional. Two tablets may be used if needed. The amount of enzyme deficiency for Lactase and Rennin and their activity level vary with each individual and foods. You may have to adjust the level of tablets up or down to find your own comfort level.


    LIFE EXTENSION PRODUCTS

    LEF: Bioactive Milk Peptides, Life Extension, 150 mg, 30 capsules
    Bioactive Milk Peptides (Lactium) are a cutting-edge nutrient complex consisting of patented bioactive peptides (Casein decapeptide) found naturally in milk. Used widely in Europe to promote sustained and restful sleep patterns, published studies reveal that these bioactive milk peptides also promote relaxation.


    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Evaporated Milk, With Vitamin D-3, Lentz Milling Co, 97 oz (Case of 6): GR
    Evaporated milk is a dehydrated, shelf-stable canned milk product with about 60-percent of the water removed from fresh milk. This milk has no added sugar, and when mixed with an equal amount of water, becomes the equivalent of fresh milk. Evaporated milk is used for dessert and baked good recipes and has a longer shelf life than fresh milk. Each case consists of six, ninety seven ounce containers.
    Kalyx: Carnation Sweet Condensed Milk, Dot Foods, 14 oz (Case of 24): GR
    This milk is made by removing the water from fresh milk and adding sugar to the remaining product. Sweet Condensed milk is a very thick, sweet substance that can last for years without refrigeration if unopened. This product is most commonly used for desserts and baked good recipes. Each case consists of twenty four, fourteen ounce containers.
    Kalyx: Milk, Non-Fat Dry Powder, Certified Organic, Frontier Foods, 5 lb: K
    This is Frontier''s nitrogen-flushed double wall silverfoil pack. Some Frontier packs are double wall wax-lined paper. Delicious, certified organic, for a quick drink and convenient recipe addition.
    Kalyx: Instant Non-Fat Dry Milk, Dutch Valley, 15 lb: GR
    Instant non-fat dry milk is great for use in drink mixes, nutrient supplements, dry blends for dips, dressings or any other product where an instant milk ingredient is needed. Each case consists of fifteen pounds.
    Kalyx: Instant Non-Fat Dry Milk, Hormel Foods, 50 lbfc: GR
    Instant non-fat dry milk is great for use in drink mixes, nutrient supplements, dry blends for dips, dressings or any other product where an instant milk ingredient is needed. Each case consists of fifty pounds.
    Kalyx: Milk, Nonfat Powder, Certified Organic, Kalyx, 50 lbs (22.73 kg): CO
    Kalyx: Whole Milk Powder 28.5%, All American Dairy Products, 50 lb.Milk Pwd.: GR
    Whole milk powder is great for use in confections, baked goods, as a nutrient supplement, an ingredient in dry blends or reconstituted for use as liquid milk. Each case consists of fifty pounds.


    AMAZON PRODUCTS - MILK POWDER

    Amazon: Milk Powder Grocery & Gourmet Food Products
    Amazon: Milk Grocery & Gourmet Food Products
    Amazon: Condensed Milk Grocery & Gourmet Food Products
    Amazon: Evaporated Milk Grocery & Gourmet Food Products



  • Nutrition Basics: Dairy Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Cheese Powder Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Buttermilk Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Goats Milk Information



  • SOUR CREAM DAIRY PRODUCTS

    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Sour Cream & Onion Popcorn Seasoning, Frontier Foods, 1 lb: K
    This is Frontier’s double wall silverfoil pack. Some Frontier packs are double wall wax-lined paper. Dehydrated nonfat yogurt (cultured nonfat milk solids), sweet cream buttermilk powder, dehydrated onion, carrot powder, inactive dried yeast, dehydrated garlic, parsley, tomato and citric acid.
    Kalyx: Cheddar Sour Cream & Onion Powder, Bulk Foods Inc, 5 lb: GR
    Combining the sharp flavor of cheddar with the familiar tang of Sour Cream & Onion was a natural choice. This powder is a great topping for popcorn, pretzels, and other snacks, as well as tasting great on baked potatoes, pastas and salads or in soups and sauces. Each case consists of five pounds.
    Kalyx: Sour Cream & Onion Powder, Dutch Valley, 10 lb: GR
    Sour Cream and onion powder is perfect for sprinkling on popcorn, chips and fries! Use this powder in soups and sauces for a tangy onion flavor. Each case consists of twenty five pounds.
    Kalyx: Sour Cream & Onion Powder, Bulk Foods Inc, 25 lb: GR
    Sour Cream and onion powder is perfect for sprinkling on popcorn, chips and fries! Use this powder in soups and sauces for a tangy onion flavor. Each case consists of twenty five pounds.


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Sour Cream Powder Products
    Amazon: Sour Cream Grocery & Gourmet Food Products



  • Nutrition Basics: Dairy Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Cheese Powder Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Buttermilk Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Goats Milk Information



  • SWEET CREAM DAIRY PRODUCTS

    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Sweet Cream Dehydrated Powder (Replaces Fresh Cream), Charleston Nut Company, 50 lb bag: GN


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Sweet Cream Grocery & Gourmet Food Products

  • Nutrition Basics: Dairy Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Cheese Powder Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Buttermilk Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Goats Milk Information



  • WHEY DAIRY PRODUCTS

    STARWEST BOTANICALS PRODUCTS

    Starwest Botanicals: Whey Powder, Sweet Organic, 4 oz.
    Starwest Botanicals: Whey Powder, Sweet, 1 lb.
    Starwest Botanicals: Whey Powder, Sweet, Organic, 1 lb.


    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbsPro: Whey To Go Protein Powder, Natural Vanilla Flavor, Solgar, 12 oz. (45790)
    HerbsPro: Designer Whey Protein, Strawberry, 12.7 oz. (73518)
    HerbsPro: Whey To Go Protein Powder, Natural Chocolate Flavor, Solgar, 16 oz. (36909)
    HerbsPro: Whey To Go Protein Powder, Natural Strawberry Flavor, Solgar, 16 oz. (100289)
    HerbsPro: Whey To Go Protein Powder, Natural Vanilla Flavor, Solgar, 32 oz. (45791)
    HerbsPro: Whey To Go Protein Powder, Natural Chocolate Flavor, Solgar, 41 oz. (36912)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein, Now Foods, 500 mg (1 lb.) (68879)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein With Glutamine, Vanilla Flavor, Now Foods, 1 lb. (68888)
    HerbsPro: 100% Whey Protein Fuel, Cookies & Cream, TwinLab, 1 lb. (84638)
    HerbsPro: 100% Berries & Whey Protein Powder, Biochem, 1.39 lbs. (79057)
    HerbsPro: 100% Whey Protein Powder, Vanilla, Biochem, 1.71 lbs. (79046)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein Isolate, Chocolate Flavor, Now Foods, 1.8 lbs. (67944)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein Isolate, Strawberry Flavor, Now Foods, 1.8 lbs. (68881)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein Isolate, Vanilla Flavor, Now Foods, 1.8 lbs. (68882)
    HerbsPro: Whey Gold, 100% Whey, Extreme Chocolate Flavor, Optimum Nutrition, 2.0 lbs. (77954)
    HerbsPro: 100% Whey Pro-Amino, Vanilla, Healthy'N Fit, 2 lbs. (65038)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein, Chocolate Flavor, Now Foods, 2 lbs. (68877)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein, Strawberry Flavor, Now Foods, 2 lbs. (68884)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein Economy, Vanilla Flavor, Now Foods, 2 lbs. (68887)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein With Glutamine, Vanilla Flavor, Now Foods, 2 lbs. (68889)
    HerbsPro: 100% Whey Protein Fuel, Chocolate Surge Flavor, TwinLab, 2 lbs. (67160)
    HerbsPro: 100% Whey Protein Fuel, Vanilla Slam Flavor, TwinLab, 2 lbs. (67161)
    HerbsPro: 100% Whey Protein Fuel, Strawberry Flavor, TwinLab, 2 lbs. (76087)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein Isolate, Natural, Pure Nutrition, 2 lbs. (73123)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein Isolate, Vanilla, Pure Nutrition, 2 lbs. (73124)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein Isolate, Peanut Butter, SDC Nutrition About Time, 2 lbs. (93204)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein Isolate, Banana, SDC Nutrition About Time, 2 lbs. (93206)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein, Cafe Mocha, BNRG, 2 lbs. (81731)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein, Vanilla Creme, BNRG, 2 lbs. (81734)
    HerbsPro: Designer Whey Protein, Strawberry, 2.1 lbs. (73396)
    HerbsPro: Pure Whey Protein, Variety Pack Vanilla, Champion Nutrition, 2.2 lbs. (14767)
    HerbsPro: Designer Whey Protein, Strawberry, 4 lbs. (73401)
    HerbsPro: Pure Whey Protein, Vanilla, Champion Nutrition, 5 lbs. (34938)
    HerbsPro: Pure Whey Protein, Chocolate, Champion Nutrition, 5 lbs. (36053)
    HerbsPro: 100% Whey Pro-Amino, Chocolate, Healthy'N Fit, 5 lbs. (65041)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein Isolate, Chocolate Flavor, Now Foods, 5 lbs. (67943)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein Isolate, Vanilla Flavor, Now Foods, 5 lbs. (68883)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein Isolate, Pure, Now Foods, 5 lbs. (68880)
    HerbsPro: 100% Whey Protein Fuel, Cookies & Cream Flavor, TwinLab, 5 lbs. (84760)
    HerbsPro: Whey Gold, 100% Whey, Chocolate Flavor, Optimum Nutrition, 5.15 lbs. (77932)
    HerbsPro: Whey Gold, 100% Whey, Cookies N Cream Flavor, Optimum Nutrition, 5.15 lbs. (77939)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein, Chocolate Economy, Now Foods, 6 lbs. (68878)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein, Now Foods, 6 lbs. (68886)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein Isolate, Chocolate Flavor, Now Foods, 10 lbs. (69022)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein, Chocolate Flavor, Now Foods, 10 lbs. (69023)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein Isolate, Vanilla Flavor, Now Foods, 10 lbs. (69024)
    HerbsPro: Whey Protein, Vanilla Flavor, Now Foods, 10 lbs. (69027)


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Whey Protein Supplement Products
    Amazon: Whey Powder Grocery & Gourmet Food Products



  • Nutrition Basics: Dairy Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Cheese Powder Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Buttermilk Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Goats Milk Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Amino Acid Complex Supplement Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Protein Supplement Information



  • YOGURT & RELATED DAIRY PRODUCTS

    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbsPro: Yogurt Starter, Natren 1.75 oz
    Authentic Bulgarian Yogurt Starter Formula that makes the most delicious yogurt in the world. One container makes up to 39 quarts.
    HerbsPro: Electric Yogurt Maker, Yogourmet, 2 Quarts
    4 easy steps to Yogourmet yogurt with live and active cultures. Slowly heat 2 quarts of milk to 180°F or bring to boiling point. Then let cool to 108 to 112°F. Dissolve 10 grams of Yogourmet yogurt starter with a small amount of lukewarm milk in a cup, then pour back in the inner container with the rest of the milk and mix well. Put the container in the yogurt maker and let incubate 4 to 4 1/2 hours or until yogurt has reached desired firmness. Refrigerate to stop incubation.


    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Yogourmet Freeze Dried Yogurt Starter and Creme Bulgare Starter, 1 oz: HF
    For better yogurt with any machine Contains three 10 gram packs (each pack makes 2 fresh quarts) homemade yogurt with Yogourmet. It is easy, natural and delicious.
    Kalyx: Yogurt Powder, Non-Fat, Frontier Foods, 1 lb: K
    This is Frontier's nitrogen-flushed double-wall silverfoil pack. Some Frontier packs are double-walled wax-lined paper. Dehydrated nonfat yogurt (cultured nonfat milk solids). Just add water and fruit for delicious yogurt. Yogurt is cultured milk made with Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. thermophilus, L. bulgaricus, or other other beneficial lactic-acid bacteria. Lactobacillus acidophilus is a 'friendly' bacterium (called a probiotic) that inhabits the intestines. It helps prevent bacterial disease, partly through the production of lactic acid. This makes it, and foods containing it, medically useful in maintaining normal intestinal flora, preventing and treating diarrhea and vaginal infections. Eating yogurt is an ancient cure for vaginal infections and diarrhea. The harmful bacteria that cause yeast infections are normally kept under control by the beneficial bacteria in our bodies. Antibiotics, antibacterial soaps, or a change in the body's acidic/alkaline balance, may wipe out beneficial as well as harmful bacteria, leaving the body open to infection. Acidophilus creates beneficia bacteria. Yeast infection can be prevented or reversed by eating three servings of acidophilus yogurt daily or by taking acidophilus as a supplement. L. acidophilus also produces lactase, the enzyme that breaks down milk sugar (lactose) into simple sugars. Fermented milks had been made since early times, when warm raw milk from cows, sheep, goats, camels, or horses was naturally preserved by common strains of Streptococcus and Lactobacillus bacteria. (The 'cultures' were obtained by including a small portion from the previous batch.) These harmless lactic acid producers were effective in suppressing spoilage and pathogenic organisms, making it possible to preserve fresh milk for several days or weeks without refrigeration. Cultured products eventually became ethnic favourites and were introduced around the world as people migrated.
    Kalyx: Yogurt Coating, Blommer Chocolate Co, 10 lb (Case of 5): GR
    Yogurt Coating is a sweet and creamy coating that is perfect for use on pretzels, nuts and dried fruit. Each case consists of five, ten pounds.
    Kalyx: Strained Greek Yogurt Flavored Drops, Clasen Quality Coating, 50 lb: GR
    These drops are perfect for the health conscious customers who want to keep their sweet cravings under control. They are great as a snack, in ice cream or used in baked goods. Each case consists of 50 pounds.

    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Yogurt Grocery & Gourmet Food Products
    Amazon: Yogurt Powder Grocery & Gourmet Food Products



  • Nutrition Basics: Dairy Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Cheese Powder Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Buttermilk Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Goats Milk Information






  • MoonDragon's Womens Health Index

    | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |






    Health & Wellness Index





    AROMATHERAPY: ESSENTIAL OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Allspice Leaf Oil
    Angelica Oil
    Anise Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Basil Oil
    Bay Laurel Oil
    Bay Oil
    Benzoin Oil
    Bergamot Oil
    Black Pepper Oil
    Chamomile (German) Oil
    Cajuput Oil
    Calamus Oil
    Camphor (White) Oil
    Caraway Oil
    Cardamom Oil
    Carrot Seed Oil
    Catnip Oil
    Cedarwood Oil
    Chamomile Oil
    Cinnamon Oil
    Citronella Oil
    Clary-Sage Oil
    Clove Oil
    Coriander Oil
    Cypress Oil
    Dill Oil
    Eucalyptus Oil
    Fennel Oil
    Fir Needle Oil
    Frankincense Oil
    Geranium Oil
    German Chamomile Oil
    Ginger Oil
    Grapefruit Oil
    Helichrysum Oil
    Hyssop Oil
    Iris-Root Oil
    Jasmine Oil
    Juniper Oil
    Labdanum Oil
    Lavender Oil
    Lemon-Balm Oil
    Lemongrass Oil
    Lemon Oil
    Lime Oil
    Longleaf-Pine Oil
    Mandarin Oil
    Marjoram Oil
    Mimosa Oil
    Myrrh Oil
    Myrtle Oil
    Neroli Oil
    Niaouli Oil
    Nutmeg Oil
    Orange Oil
    Oregano Oil
    Palmarosa Oil
    Patchouli Oil
    Peppermint Oil
    Peru-Balsam Oil
    Petitgrain Oil
    Pine-Long Leaf Oil
    Pine-Needle Oil
    Pine-Swiss Oil
    Rosemary Oil
    Rose Oil
    Rosewood Oil
    Sage Oil
    Sandalwood Oil
    Savory Oil
    Spearmint Oil
    Spikenard Oil
    Swiss-Pine Oil
    Tangerine Oil
    Tea-Tree Oil
    Thyme Oil
    Vanilla Oil
    Verbena Oil
    Vetiver Oil
    Violet Oil
    White-Camphor Oil
    Yarrow Oil
    Ylang-Ylang Oil
    Aromatherapy
    Healing Baths For Colds
    Aromatherapy
    Herbal Cleansers
    Using Essential Oils


    AROMATHERAPY: HERBAL & CARRIER OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Almond, Sweet Oil
    Apricot Kernel Oil
    Argan Oil
    Arnica Oil
    Avocado Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Black Cumin Oil
    Black Currant Oil
    Black Seed Oil
    Borage Seed Oil
    Calendula Oil
    Camelina Oil
    Castor Oil
    Coconut Oil
    Comfrey Oil
    Evening Primrose Oil
    Flaxseed Oil
    Grapeseed Oil
    Hazelnut Oil
    Hemp Seed Oil
    Jojoba Oil
    Kukui Nut Oil
    Macadamia Nut Oil
    Meadowfoam Seed Oil
    Mullein Oil
    Neem Oil
    Olive Oil
    Palm Oil
    Plantain Oil
    Plum Kernel Oil
    Poke Root Oil
    Pomegranate Seed Oil
    Pumpkin Seed Oil
    Rosehip Seed Oil
    Safflower Oil
    Sea Buckthorn Oil
    Sesame Seed Oil
    Shea Nut Oil
    Soybean Oil
    St. Johns Wort Oil
    Sunflower Oil
    Tamanu Oil
    Vitamin E Oil
    Wheat Germ Oil





    HELPFUL RELATED MOONDRAGON NUTRITION BASICS LINKS

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Amino Acids Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Antioxidants Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Enzymes Information
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Herbs Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Homeopathics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Hydrosols Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Minerals Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Mineral Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary & Cosmetic Supplements Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary Supplements Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Specialty Supplements
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Introduction


  • NUTRITION BASICS ARTICLES

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: 4 Basic Nutrients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Foods That Contain Additives & Artificial Ingredients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Is Aspartame A Safe Sugar Substitute?
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Guidelines For Selecting & Preparing Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Destroy
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Heal
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: The Micronutrients: Vitamins & Minerals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Overcooking Your Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Phytochemicals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Increase Your Consumption of Raw Produce
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Limit Your Use of Salt
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Use Proper Cooking Utensils
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Choosing The Best Water & Types of Water





  • RELATED MOONDRAGON HEALTH LINKS & INFORMATION

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Analysis Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Diet Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Recipe Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Therapy: Preparing Produce for Juicing
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Additives Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Safety Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Articles
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Back Pain
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Labor & Birth
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Blending Chart
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Essential Oil Details
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Miscarriage
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Post Partum
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Childbearing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Problems in Pregnancy & Birthing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #1
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #2
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Tips
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Uses
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Information Overview
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Touch & Movement Therapies Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy: Touch & Movement: Aromatherapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Therapy: Touch & Movement - Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Therapeutic Massage
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 1
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 2
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Hydrotherapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Pain Control Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Relaxation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Steam Inhalation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy - Herbal Oils Index







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    MOONDRAGON'S REALM - WEBSITE DIRECTORY


    A website map to help you find what you are looking for on MoonDragon.org's Website. Available pages have been listed under appropriate directory headings.




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