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MoonDragon's Health & Wellness
Nutrition Basics

Herbs
WORMWOOD

Absinthe, Absinthium
Common Wormwood, Greater Wormwood

(Artemisia Absinthium)
ROMAN WORMWOOD
Lesser Wormwood

(Artemisia Pontica)


"For Informational Use Only"
For more detailed information contact your health care provider
about options that may be available for your specific situation.





  • Wormwood Herbal Description
  • Wormwood Uses, Health Benefits & Scientific Evidence
  • Wormwood Dosage Information
  • Wormwood Safety, Cautions & Interactions
  • Wormwood Supplements & Products




  • wormwood - artemisia absinthium plant


    WORMWOOD HERBAL DESCRIPTION

    AN AROMATIC BITTER HERB

    Wormwood Artemesia absinthium is also known as Absinthe, Absinthe Wormwood, Absinthium, Ajenjo, Common Wormwood, Grand Wormwood, Green Ginger, Madderwort, and Old Woman.

    Wormwood is a species of Artemesia, native to temperate regions of Eurasia and Northern Africa. It is widely naturalized in Canada and the norther United States. It is grown as an ornamental plant and is used as an ingredient in the spirit Absinthe as well as some other alcoholic drinks. The word Wormwood comes from Middle English wormwode or wermode. The form "wormwood" is attributable to its traditional use as a vermifuge. Artemesia absinthium is traditionally used medicinally in Europe and is believed to stimulate the appetite and relieve indigestion.

    Wormwood is a shrubby, herbaceous, perennial plant with fibrous roots. The grayish-white stems of the herb are straight and covered with fine silky hairs, The plant grows from 1 to 3 feet tall, rarely to almost 4 feet appearing tall, grooved, branched and silvery-green in color. The leaves are spirally arranged, greenish-grey in color above and white below, covered with silky silvery-white hairy trichomes, and bearing minute oil-producing glands with small resinous particles. The basal leaves are up to 10 inches long, bipinnate to tripinnate with long petioles (the stalk attaching the leaf to the stem), with cauline leaves (those on the stem), 2 to 4 inches long, less divided, and with short petioles. The uppermost leaves can be both simple and sessile (without a petiole). Its flowers are pale yellow, tubular, and clustered in spherical bent-down heads (capitula), which are in turn clustered in leafy and branched panicles. Flowering is from early summer to early autumn. Pollination is anemophilous (distributed by the wind). The fruit is a small achene (a type of simple dry fruit containing a single seed) and is dispersed by gravity.

    The plant can be easily cultivated in dry soil. It should be planted under bright exposure in fertile, mid-weight soil. I prefers soil rich in nitrogen. It can be propagated by ripened cuttings taken in Spring or Autumn in temperate climates, or by seeds in nursery beds. Artemisia absinthium also self-seeds generously. It is naturalized in some areas away from its native range, including much of North America and Kashmir Valley of India.

    The plant is aromatic with a spicy, somewhat bitter taste. Artemisia absinthium contains thujone, a GABAA receptor antagonist that can cause epileptic-like convulsions and kidney failure when ingested in large amounts. In ancient folklore, Wormwood was said to counteract the effects of poisoning by hemlock, toadstools, and sea dragon bites.

    Wormwood is one of the most bitter herbs known, but is very wholesome. Throughout history Wormwood has been used to stimulate uterine contractions during childbirth.

    Another species, Sweet Wormwood (Artemesia annua), is often grown as an ornamental, but actually contains an essential oil that has strong anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, diuretic and antibacterial properties.

    MYTHICAL, MAGICKAL & RITUAL USE OF WORMWOOD

    Artemisia comes from Ancient Greek (Artemis). In Hellenistic culture, Artemis is the Goddess of the Hunt, and protector of the forest and children.

    The Wormwood plant was important among the Mexicans, who celebrated their great festival of the Goddess of Salt with women who were adorned with Wormwood garland, and performed a ceremonial dance.

    An Old Love Charm: On St. Luke's Day, take marigold flowers, a sprig of marjoram, thyme, and a little Wormwood; dry them before a fire, rub them to powder; then sift it through a fine piece of lawn, and simmer it over a slow fire, adding a small quantity of virgin honey, and vinegar. Anoint yourself with this when you go to bed, saying the following lines three times, and you will dream of your partner 'that is to be': "St. Luke, St. Luke, be kind to me, In dreams let me my true-love see."

    OTHER RELATED WORMWOOD FAMILY MEMBERS

    The Wormwoods are members of the great family of Compositae and belong to the genus Artemisia, a group consisting of 180 species. Besides Common Wormwood (A. absinthium), the other more common members are Roman Wormwood (A. pontica), Sea Wormwood, Mugwort (A. vulgaris), Tarragon (A. dracunculus) which claims a place in every herb-garden, and Southernwood (A. abrotanum), an old-fashioned favorite found in many borders, whilst others, such as A. sericea, A. cana and A. alpina, form pretty rockwork shrubs.

    WORMWOOD, ROMAN

    Roman Wormwood (Artemesia Pontica) is a native of Southern Europe. It grows about the same height as the Common Wormwood, but has smaller and more finely cut leaves, the segments being narrower, the upper leaves more resembling those of Southernwood; the leaves are white with fine hairs on both upper and under surfaces. The flowers, which blossom in July, are numerous, at the tops of the branches, and are darker and much smaller than those of Common Wormwood.

    This is the most delicate though the least strong of the Wormwoods; the aromatic flavor with which its bitterness is mixed causes it to be employed in making the liqueur Vermouth. Medicinally, the fresh tops are used, and also the whole herb, dried. Much of the A. Pontica in commerce is A. maritima. It has been considered an excellent strengthener of the stomach. The juice of the fresh tops have been used for treating liver and spleen ailments. An infusion of the flowering tops strengthens digestion. A tincture is good against gravel and gives great relief in the gout. The Wormwood wine, so famous with the Germans, is made with Roman Wormwood juice and it is a strong and an excellent wine, not unpleasant, yet of such efficacy to give an appetite that the Germans drink a glass with every other mouthful, and that way eat for hours together, without sickness or indigestion.

    When it comes to absinthe, Roman Wormwood (Artemisia pontica) is primarily used for coloring. Although closely related, one should not confuse it with the most important absinthe ingredient - Grand Wormwood (Artemsia absinthium). Sometimes Roman Wormwood is used as an ingredient for the main maceration, but Grand Wormwood is never, ever used as a coloring ingredient as it is far too bitter.

    Roman Wormwood (Artemisia pontica) plants also look quite different from Grand Wormwood. Artemisia absinthium can grow into a big sized bush between 40 to 80 inches, while Roman Wormwood is a much more dainty, spreading plant that seldom grows more than 4 to 8 inches high. Roman Wormwood also goes dormant in the winter and will die off but will re-sprout from the roots in spring. Without a doubt, Roman Wormwood can be a more difficult plant to obtain and it is a quite important ingredient for coloring.

    Roman Wormwood adds it's own unique taste characteristics to the final Absinthe product. I have seen only one company offer seed for it and even there, it had been out of stock for over a year and I never was able to obtain it from seed. Iíve been growing my own for years, starting with a small sprig with a root on it and have never seen it bloom. Obtaining a live plant and growing it is your best option and it does grow wild in certain areas. Fortunately, once you obtain a plant itís quite easy to grow. If the potential absinthe maker is not able to obtain Roman Wormwood, real absinthe can be still made, it just wont taste quite the same. I case you are tempted to substitute another type of Artemesia plant for Roman Wormwood, I would not recommend that you do that, you would be better off to simply skip it as an ingredient until you are able to obtain it properly, you can still make a very tasty absinthe without it, and Hyssop and Melissa will still impart a nice green color to your absinthe.

    WORMWOOD, SEA

    Sea Wormwood (Artemesia maritima) habitat in Britain is found as far-as Wigton on the West and Aberdeen on the East; also in north-east Ireland and in the Channel Islands. The Sea Wormwood, in its many variations of form, has an extremely wide distribution in the northern hemisphere of the Old World, occurring mostly in saltish soils. It is found in the salt marshes of the British Isles, on the coasts of the Baltic, of France and the Mediterranean, and on saline soils in Hungary; thence it extends eastwards, covering immense tracts in Southern Russia, the region of the Caspian and Central Siberia to Chinese Mongolia. Sea Wormwood somewhat resembles Artemesia Absinthium, but is smaller. The stems rise about a foot or 18 inches in height. The leaves are twice pinnatifid, with narrow, linear segments, and, like the whole plant, are covered on both sides with a white cottony down. The small, oblong flower-heads, each containing three to six tubular florets, are of a yellowish or brownish tint; they are produced in August and September, and are arranged in racemes, sometimes drooping, sometimes erect. Popularly this species is called 'Old Woman,' in distinction to 'Old Man' or Southernwood, which it somewhat resembles, though it is more delicate-looking and lacks the peculiar refreshing scent of 'Old Man.'

    Sea Wormwood is considered a very noble bitter. Its peculiar province is to give an appetite, as that of the Common Wormwood is to assist digestion. The flowery tops and the young shoots possess the virtue. The older Leaves and the Stalk should be thrown away as useless. The apothecaries put three times as much sugar as of the ingredient in their Conserves; but the virtue is lost in the sweetness, those will not keep so well that have less sugar, but it is easy to make them fresh as they are wanted.

    The plant abounds in salt marshes in which cattle have been observed to fatten quickly, and thus the herb has acquired the reputation of being beneficial to them, but they do not eat it generally, and the richness of maritime pasturage must be regarded as the true reason of their improvement under such circumstances. The flowering tops and young shoots are used, collected and dried in the same manner as Wormwood. The plant possesses the same properties as the otherWormwoods, but is less powerful. It is a bitter tonic and aromatic. Although it is not now employed in regular medical practice, it is often made use of by country people for intermittent fever, and for various other medicinal purposes instead of the true Wormwood. It acts as a tonic and is good in worm cases. An infusion of herb and boiling water produces an excellent stomachic infusion, but the best way is taking it in a tincture made with brandy. According to lore, hysteric complaints have been completely cured by the constant use of this tincture. In the scurvy and in the hypochondriacal disorders of studious, sedentary men, few things have a greater effect: for these it is best in strong infusion. The whole blood and all the juices of the body are effected by taking this herb. It is often used in medicine instead of the Roman Wormwood, though it falls far short of it in virtue.





    wormwood - artemisia absinthium plant


    WORMWOOD USES, HEALTH BENEFITS, & SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE

    MEDICINAL USES

    Today Wormwood is used as a mild sedative, but is also used to eliminate worms, increase stomach acidity, and lower a fever. It can help you regain appetite and it enhances digestion by increasing the secretion of digestive enzymes and bile from the liver and gallbladder. This herb also works well for eliminating toxins and congestion in the gut.

    The most common use for this bitter herb is to stimulate the digestive system. You may be familiar with the practice of taking bitters before meals to aid digestion. A bitter taste in the mouth triggers release of bile from the gallbladder and other secretions from intestinal glands, which enables us to digest food. People with weak digestion or insufficient stomach acid may benefit from taking wormwood preparations before meals. Wormwood, however, may cause diarrhea. Its secretion-stimulating qualities make the intestines empty quickly. Because wormwood also contains a substance that is toxic if consumed for a long time, it is used only in small amounts for a short time.

    Wormwood has also been used to treat liver, gallbladder, gastric, and vascular disorders, and migraine. It is used for treating infections, fever, colds and flu. Wormwood can also be used to bring on delayed or suppressed menstruation due to stagnation in the uterus, and for painful periods. This herb can be used topically for wounds, skin ulcers, blemishes, and insect bites.

    Wormwood is often used with Black Walnut for the removal of parasites. The herb long has been used in herbal remedies to rid the body of pinworms, roundworms, and other intestinal parasites. However, it can also be used to enhance digestion for the worm-free.

    The drug, absinthium, is rarely employed, but it might be of value in nervous diseases such as neurasthenia, as it stimulates the cerebral hemispheres, and is a direct stimulant of the cortex cerebri. When taken to excess it produces giddiness and attacks of epileptiform convulsions.

    THE SPIRIT ABSINTHE

    Wormwood's bitter substances, called absinthin, have also been used to brew beer and distill alcohol.

    Wormwood is an ingredient in the spirit Absinthe. Absinthe, an old French liqueur is historically described as a distilled, highly alcoholic (45 to 74% or 90 to 146 Proof) beverage. It is an anise-flavored spirit derived from botanicals, including the flowers and leaves of Wormwood (A. absinthium), together with the Green Anise, Sweet Fennel, and other medicinal and culinary herbs. Absinthe traditionally has a natural green color but may also be colorless. It has also been referred to as The Green Fairy in historic literature. Although it is sometimes mistakenly referred to as a liqueur, Absinthe is not traditonally bottled with added sugar. It is therefore classified as a spirit. Absinthe is traditionally bottled at a high level of alcohol by volume, but it is normally diluted with water prior to being consumed. Absinthe is considered a preserver of the mind, from its medicinal virtues as a nervine and mental restorative. If not taken habitually, it soothes spinal irritability and gives tone to persons of a highly nervous temperament. Suitable allowances of the diluted liqueur will promote salutary perspiration and may be given as a vermifuge. Inferior absinthe is generally adulterated with copper, which produces the characteristic green color.

    It has been illegal until recently because absinthol, a volatile oil the herb contains, has been found to cause nerve depression, mental impairment, and loss of reproductive function when used for a long time. However, it has been shown that the spirit actually has very small amounts and has since had the ban lifted on the making, selling, and distribution of Absinthe spirits. Today it is known that absinthe does not cause hallucinations. It is widely accepted that reports of hallucinogenic effects of absinthe were attributable to the poisonous adulterants being added to cheaper versions of the drink in the 19th century, such as oil of wormwood, impure alcohol, and poisonous coloring matter (e.g. copper salts).

    Absinthe has often been portrayed as a dangerously addictive psychoactive drug and hallucinogen. The chemical compound thujone, although present in the spirit in only trace amounts, was blamed for its alleged harmful effects. By 1915, absinthe had been banned in the United States and in much of Europe, including France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland and Austria-Hungary. Although absinthe was vilified, it has not been demonstrated to be any more dangerous than ordinary spirits. Recent studies have shown that absinthe's psychoactive properties (apart from that of the alcohol) have been exaggerated. A revival of absinthe began in the 1990s, following the adoption of modern European Union food and beverage laws that removed longstanding barriers to its production and sale. By the early 21st century, nearly 200 brands of absinthe were being produced in a dozen countries, most notably in France, Switzerland, Australia, United States, Spain, and the Czech Republic.

    The traditional French preparation involves placing a sugar cube on top of a specially designed slotted spoon, and placing the spoon on a glass filled with a measure of absinthe. Iced water is poured or dripped over the sugar cube to slowly and evenly distribute the water into the absinthe. The final preparation contains 1 part absinthe and 3 to 5 parts water. As water dilutes the spirit, those components with poor water solubility (mainly those from anise, fennel, and star anise) come out of solution and cloud the drink. The resulting milky opalescence is called the louche (French for opaque or shady). The release of these dissolved essences coincides with a perfuming of herbal aromas and flavors that "blossom" or "bloom," and brings out subtleties that are otherwise muted within the neat spirit. This reflects what is perhaps the oldest and purest method of preparation, and is often referred to as the French Method.

    Absinthe Spoons


    Absinthe spoons are designed to perch a sugar cube atop the glass, over which ice-cold water is dripped to dilute the absinthe. The lip near the centre of the handle lets the spoon rest securely on the rim of the glass. Preparing absinthe using the traditional method, which does not involve burning. A sequence of four images showing the traditional way to prepare absinthe.

    Traditional Method of Preparation


    Wormwood is used for flavoring in some other spirits and wines, including bitters, vermouth, and pelinkovac. Wormwood also lent its flavor and its name to vermouth. The German word for wormwood is "wermuth," which is the source of the modern word vermouth.

    In the Middle Ages, it was used to spice mead, a honey wine, and in Moracco it is used as a tea. In 16th century England, Wormwood was sometimes used instead of Hops in beer.





    WORMWOOD DOSAGE INFORMATION

    SUPPLEMENTS

    Wormwood leaves and flowers are very bitter, with a characteristic odor, resembling that of thujone. The root has a warm and aromatic taste. The whole herb, leaves and tops, are gathered in July and August, when the plant is in flower and dried. Collect only on a dry day, after the sun has dried off the dew. Cut off the upper green portion and reject the lower parts of the stems together with any discolored or insect-eaten leaves. Tie loosely in bunches of uniform size and length, about six stalks to a bunch, and spread out in the shape of a fan, so that the air can get to all parts. Hang over strings in the open, on a fine, sunny, warm day, but in half-shade, otherwise the leaves will become tindery, the drying must not be done in full sunlight, or the aromatic properties will be partly lost. Aromatic herbs should be dried at a temperature of about 70°F. If no sun is available, the bunches may be hung over strings in a covered shed, or disused greenhouse, or in a sunny warm attic, provided there is ample ventilation, so that the moist heated air may escape. The room may also be heated with a coke or anthracite stove, care being taken that the window is kept open during the day. If after some days the leaves are crisp and the stalks still damp, hang the bunches over a stove, when the stalks will quickly finish drying. Uniformity in size in the bunches is important, as it facilitates packing. When the drying process is completed, pack away at once in airtight boxes, as otherwise the herbs will absorb about 12 per cent moisture from the air. If used in powdered form, rub through a sieve as soon as thoroughly dry, before the bunches have had time to absorb any moisture, and pack in tins or bottles at once.

    Wormwood's chief constituent is a volatile oil, of which the herb yields in distillation from 0.5 to 1.0 per cent. It is usually dark green, or sometimes blue in color, and has a strong odor and bitter, acrid taste. The oil contains thujone (absinthol or tenacetone), thujyl alcohol (both free and combined with acetic, isovalerianic, succine and malic acids), cadinene, phellandrene and pinene. The herb also contains the bitter glucoside absinthin, absinthic acid, together with tannin, resin, starch, nitrate of potash and other salts.

    Wormwood comes in various supplemental forms and is an ingredient in many products. For a tea take 1 teaspoon of the herb to 1 cup of boiling water (or 1 ounce infused in 1 pint of boiling water). Let it to steep for 10 to 15 minutes. Drink 3 cups per day. It will help relieve depression (melancholia) and help dispel the yellow hue of jaundice from the skin, as well as being a good stomachic. with the addition of fixed alkaline salt, produced from the burnt plant, is a powerful diuretic in some dropsical cases. The ashes yield a purer alkaline salt than most other vegetables.

    The juice of the larger leaves which grow from the root before the stalk appears has been used as a remedy for jaundice and dropsy, but it is intensely nauseous. A light infusion of the tops of the plant, used fresh, is excellent for all disorders of the stomach, creating an appetite, promoting digestion and preventing sickness after meals, but it is said to produce the contrary effect if made too strong.

    The flowers, dried and powdered, are most effectual as a vermifuge, and used to be considered excellent in agues. The essential oil of the herb is used as a worm-expeller, the spirituous extract being preferable to that distilled in water. The leaves give out nearly the whole of their smell and taste both to spirit and water, but the cold water infusions are the least offensive.

    For using a tincture, put 10 to 20 drops in water, and drink 10 to 15 minutes before each meal. Either preparation should not be used for more than four weeks consecutively. For other uses, read and follow product label directions.





    WORMWOOD SAFETY, CAUTIONS & INTERACTION INFORMATION

    SAFETY CONCERNS

    Wormwood contains thujone, a narcotic poison that can damage the nervous system and cause mental deterioration. The levels vary considerably among the different species, however, and usually very high doses over a period of years are required before any effects are noted.

    Do not use Wormwood while pregnant or nursing.

    Those with bleeding problems should also avoid the herb as large doses can be toxic.

    Wormwood can also be habit forming if using over an extended period of time.

    Safety in young children or those with severe liver or kidney disease is not known.





    WORMWOOD HERBAL PRODUCTS

  • Wormwood Herbal Products


  • QUALITY SUPPLIES & PRODUCTS


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    WORMWOOD HERBAL PRODUCTS

    Wormwood herb is also known as Artemisia absinthium, green ginger, absinthe, old women and southernwood. (Please note: Wormwood should not be used during pregnancy or while nursing. Wormwood herb is not for long-term use and you should not exceed the recommended dose.)

    MOUNTAIN ROSE HERBS PRODUCTS

    Mountain Rose Herbs: Wormwood (Artemisia Absinthium), Certified Organic, Bulk Organic Herbs & Spices
    Mountain Rose Herbs: Wormwood (Artemisia Absinthium), Certified Organic, Medicinal Herb Seeds
    Woody perennial. Sow in Fall or early Spring. Prefers full sun and dry like conditions. A useful tea made from the leaves will help rid the GI tract of parasites, and was the traditional ingredient for Absinthe.
    Mountain Rose Herbs: Wormwood Extract (Artemisia Absinthium), Certified Organic, Single Herbal Extracts & Tinctures
    Mountain Rose Herbs: Wormwood Herb, Certified Organic, 350 mg, 100 Caps, Single Herbal Capsules


    STARWEST BOTANICALS PRODUCTS

    Starwest Botanicals: Wormwood (Artemisia Absinthium), Cut & Sifted, Organic, 1 lb.
    Starwest Botanicals: Wormwood Herb (Artemisia Absinthium), Cut & Sifted, Wildcrafted, 1 lb.
    Starwest Botanicals: Wormwood Herb Powder (Artemisia Absinthium), Wildcrafted, 1 lb.
    Starwest Botanicals: Wormwood Essential Oil, 1/3 fl. oz.
    Starwest Botanicals: Wormwood Essential Oil, 4 fl. oz.


    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbsPro: Wormwood Flower & Leaf Extract (Artemisia Absinthium), Organic, Eclectic Institute Inc, 1 fl. oz. (945)
    HerbsPro: Wormwood Flower & Leaf Extract (Artemisia Absinthium), Organic, Herb Pharm, 1 fl. oz. (31357)
    HerbsPro: Wormwood Flower & Leaf Extract (Artemisia Absinthium), Organic, Eclectic Institute Inc, 2 fl. oz. (32156)
    HerbsPro: Wormwood Flower & Leaf Extract (Artemisia Absinthium), Organic, Herb Pharm, 4 fl. oz. (32359)
    HerbsPro: Fresh Green Black Walnut & Wormwood Extract, Now Foods, 2 fl. oz. (68189)
    This powerful extract is derived from the hulls of green black walnuts, and has been used for centuries as an herbal tonic to promote healthy microbial activity. Parasites and other unwelcome organisms would be much happier if you did not take Green Black Walnut & Walnut extract! Proprietary blend of fresh green Black Walnut hulls with Wormwood herb (Artemisia absinthium) and Clove Buds.
    HerbsPro: Black Walnut, Cinnamon & Wormwood Glycerite Compound Extract, Eclectic Institute Inc, 1 fl. oz. (2181)
    Cinnamon Flavored, Alcohol Free Compount Extract contains Fresh wildcrafted Black Walnut (Juglans nigra) green outer hull, 1:1, 16.7%; Dried certified organic Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) flower & leaf, 1:4, 16.7%; Dried certified organic Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) leaf, 1:4, 16.7%; Dried wildcrafted Cascara Sagrada (Rhamnus purshiana) aged bark, 1:4, 16.7%; Dried Cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) bark, 1:4, 16.7%; Dried wildcrafted Quassia (Picrasma excelsa) wood, 1:4, 16.7%. Kosher vegetable glycerine 80%. Cinnamon essential oil.
    HerbsPro: Black Walnut, Cinnamon & Wormwood Glycerite Compound Extract, Eclectic Institute Inc, 2 fl. oz. (31846)
    Cinnamon Flavored, Alcohol Free Compount Extract contains Fresh wildcrafted Black Walnut (Juglans nigra) green outer hull, 1:1, 16.7%; Dried certified organic Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) flower & leaf, 1:4, 16.7%; Dried certified organic Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) leaf, 1:4, 16.7%; Dried wildcrafted Cascara Sagrada (Rhamnus purshiana) aged bark, 1:4, 16.7%; Dried Cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) bark, 1:4, 16.7%; Dried wildcrafted Quassia (Picrasma excelsa) wood, 1:4, 16.7%. Kosher vegetable glycerine 80%. Cinnamon essential oil.
    HerbsPro: Black Walnut & Wormwood Compound Extract, Eclectic Institute Inc, 1 fl. oz. (2232)
    HerbsPro: Black Walnut & Wormwood Compound Extract, Eclectic Institute Inc, 2 fl. oz.
    HerbsPro: Wormwood & Black Walnut Supreme Extract (Artemisia Absinthium & Annua), Gaia Herbs, 1 fl. oz. (91078)
    Supports healthy intestinal environment. Supports the GI Tract and promotes healthy intestinal flora. Contains fresh Black Walnut hulls.
    HerbsPro: Wormwood & Black Walnut Supreme Extract (Artemisia Absinthium & Annua), Gaia Herbs, 2 fl. oz. (91079)
    Supports healthy intestinal environment. Supports the GI Tract and promotes healthy intestinal flora. Contains fresh Black Walnut hulls.
    HerbsPro: Sweet Wormwood Extract (Artemisia Annua), Certified Organic, Gaia Herbs, 1 fl. oz. (91039)
    Supports a healthy intestinal environment. Supports the digestive tract and promotes healthy intestinal flora.
    HerbsPro: Sweet Wormwood Extract (Artemisia Annua), Certified Organic, Gaia Herbs, 4 fl. oz. (91041)
    Supports a healthy intestinal environment. Supports the digestive tract and promotes healthy intestinal flora.
    HerbsPro: Sweet Wormwood Extract (Artemisia Annua), Certified Organic, Gaia Herbs, 16 fl. oz. (91043)
    Supports a healthy intestinal environment. Suppoooorts the digestive tract and promotes healthy intestinal flora.
    HerbsPro: PhytoArtemisinin (Sweet Wormwood), Nutricology, 100 mg, 90 Caps (79169)
    PhytoArtemisinin contains pure artemisinin (Qinghaosu), the active constituent of the herb Artemisia annua (sweet wormwood) enhanced with phytosaponins. NutriCology introduced artemisinin to the U.S. market more than a decade ago. NutriCology does independent potency assays on every batch (using HPLC), and independent tests verify its effectiveness. NutriCology artemisinin is minimum 98.5% pure, and does not contain thujone. Ingredients include Gleditsia Sinensis (350 mg) and Artemisinin (100 mg) per capsule.
    HerbsPro: Best Artemisinin (Sweet Wormwood), Doctors Best, 100 mg, 90 VCaps (69178)
    Best Artemisinin contains high quality Artemisinin or Ching-hao-su, an extract from the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua (sweet wormwood) or Ching-hao. Sweet wormwood leaves have been consumed over several centuries for promoting general health. The extract Artemisinin has been used for several decades. The Artemisinin used in Best Artemisinin is extracted from plants grown and harvested in accordance with GAP (Good Agricultural Practice) standards. The extract itself is manufactured to the highest pharmaceutical-grade quality specifications in a certified GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) facility, ensuring the highest potency.
    HerbsPro: Artemisinin (Sweet Wormwood), Balancing The GI Tract, Nutricology, 100 mg, 90 Caps (38743)
    Pure artemisinin or Qinghaosu, the active constituent of the herb Artemesia annua (sweet wormwood). Good quality Artemesia annua contains 0.3 to 0.5% artemisinin, so pure Artemisinin provides hundreds of times more of the active constituent artemisinin than the whole herb itself. Research has shown artemisinin to be particularly beneficial in balancing the microbiology of the GI tract.
    HerbsPro: Artemisinin (Sweet Wormwood), Balancing The GI Tract, Nutricology, 100 mg, 300 Caps (79176)
    Pure artemisinin or Qinghaosu, the active constituent of the herb Artemesia annua (sweet wormwood). Good quality Artemesia annua contains 0.3 to 0.5% artemisinin, so pure Artemisinin provides hundreds of times more of the active constituent artemisinin than the whole herb itself. Research has shown artemisinin to be particularly beneficial in balancing the microbiology of the GI tract.
    HerbsPro: Super Artemisinin (Sweet Wormwood), Nutricology, 200 mg, 60 Caps (79174)
    Pure artemisinin or Qinghaosu, the active constituent of the herb sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua), and oil derived from the same plant, total 200 mg of material per capsule. Good quality Artemisia annua contains 0.3 to 0.5% artemisinin; so pure artemisinin provides hundreds of times more of the active constituent artemisinin than the whole herb itself. Research has shown artemisinin to be particularly beneficial in balancing the microbiology of the GI tract. NutriCology introduced artemisinin to the U.S. market more than a decade ago. NutriCology does independent potency assays on every batch (using HPLC), and independent tests verify its effectiveness. NutriCology artemisinin is minimum 98.5% pure, and does not contain thujone.
    HerbsPro: Wormwood (Artemisia Absinthium), Organic, Oregon's Wild Harvest, 260 mg, 90 Caps (83537)
    HerbsPro: Black Walnut & Wormwood Compound, Eclectic Institute Inc, 350 mg, 45 Caps (1019)
    Each 350 mg capsule contains 100% Fresh Freeze-Dried: Concentrate of Juglans nigra, Black Walnut green outer hull, equivalent to 400 mg of dry outer hull; Concentrate of organically grown Artemisia absinthium, Wormwood flower & leaf, equivalent to 1000 mg of dry flower & leaf; Concentrate of Syzgium aromaticum, Clove flower, equivalent to 150 mg of dry flower; Organically grown Artemisia annua, Chinese Wormwood leaf, equivalent to 1000 mg of fresh leaf.
    HerbsPro: Wormwood Combination, Parasite Resistance Support, Kroeger Herb, 350 mg, 100 Caps (49603)
    Wormwood Combination is their absolute best seller for 17 years and praised around the world! KHP's secret formula is unequaled in the crowded wormwood market of today. For centuries naturopathic healing has advocated cleansing the body of parasites as an aspect of health maintenance. According to this traditional school of holistic practices, sluggish relief, poor digestion and assimilation often accompany excessive parasite populations. Judicious quantities of bitter and spicy substances were often recommended as tonics. This classical herbal combination combines Wormwood, Black Walnut, Quassia, and Male Fern, some of the naturopath's bitter favorites for roundworms, plus Cloves for improved digestion. Folk literature credits Male Fern with the ability to paralyze parasites so that they may more easily be passed out of the system. Black Walnut assists with anti-viral and laxative effects, according to traditional herbalism. Serving size is 2 capsules (700 mg) proprietary blend.
    HerbsPro: Wormwood Kit, Kroeger Herb, 5 Count (87364)
    Products for a clean, healthy lifestyle. Contains two bottles of Wormwood Combination, two bottles of Cloves, and one 2 oz. bottle of Extra Strength Black Walnut Hull Tincture (from green walnut hulls). Wormwood Combination: Take 2 capsules 3 times daily before meals. Cloves: 1 capsule 3 times daily before meals. Black Walnut Hull Tincture: Shake well. Use 15 drops 3 times a day or as recommended by a health care professional. May be used in a glass of water or directly on back of tongue. Warm water helps evaporate the alcohol.


    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Absinthe (Wormwood) Essential Oil, Starwest Botanicals, 1/3 fl. oz (C)
    Kalyx: Absinthe (Wormwood) Essential Oil, Starwest Botanicals, 4 fl. oz (C)
    Kalyx: Absinthe (Wormwood) Extract, Health & Herbs, 2 fl. oz (HH)
    Kalyx: Absinthe (Wormwood) Extract, Health & Herbs, 8 fl. oz (HH)
    Kalyx: Absinthe (Wormwood) Extract, Health & Herbs, 16 fl. oz (HH)


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Wormwood Supplement Products
    Amazon: Wormwood Herbal Products
    Amazon: Absinthe Herbal Gourmet Food Products
    Amazon: Absinthe Liquor Products


    RICHTERS SEEDS & PLANTS

    Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) Seeds
    African Wormwood (Artemisia afra) Seeds
    Sweet Wormwood (Artemisia annua) Seeds
    Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) Plants
    Silver King Wormwood (Artemisia ludoviciana 'Silver King') Plants
    Silver Mound Wormwood (Artemisia schmidtiana 'Nana') Plants
    Silver Queen Wormwood (Artemisia ludoviciana 'Silver Queen') Plants
    Tree Wormwood (Artemisia arborescens) Plants


  • Nutrition Basics: Wormwood (Absinthe) Herbal Information






  • MoonDragon's Womens Health Index

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    Health & Wellness Index





    AROMATHERAPY: ESSENTIAL OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Allspice Leaf Oil
    Angelica Oil
    Anise Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Basil Oil
    Bay Laurel Oil
    Bay Oil
    Benzoin Oil
    Bergamot Oil
    Black Pepper Oil
    Chamomile (German) Oil
    Cajuput Oil
    Calamus Oil
    Camphor (White) Oil
    Caraway Oil
    Cardamom Oil
    Carrot Seed Oil
    Catnip Oil
    Cedarwood Oil
    Chamomile Oil
    Cinnamon Oil
    Citronella Oil
    Clary-Sage Oil
    Clove Oil
    Coriander Oil
    Cypress Oil
    Dill Oil
    Eucalyptus Oil
    Fennel Oil
    Fir Needle Oil
    Frankincense Oil
    Geranium Oil
    German Chamomile Oil
    Ginger Oil
    Grapefruit Oil
    Helichrysum Oil
    Hyssop Oil
    Iris-Root Oil
    Jasmine Oil
    Juniper Oil
    Labdanum Oil
    Lavender Oil
    Lemon-Balm Oil
    Lemongrass Oil
    Lemon Oil
    Lime Oil
    Longleaf-Pine Oil
    Mandarin Oil
    Marjoram Oil
    Mimosa Oil
    Myrrh Oil
    Myrtle Oil
    Neroli Oil
    Niaouli Oil
    Nutmeg Oil
    Orange Oil
    Oregano Oil
    Palmarosa Oil
    Patchouli Oil
    Peppermint Oil
    Peru-Balsam Oil
    Petitgrain Oil
    Pine-Long Leaf Oil
    Pine-Needle Oil
    Pine-Swiss Oil
    Rosemary Oil
    Rose Oil
    Rosewood Oil
    Sage Oil
    Sandalwood Oil
    Savory Oil
    Spearmint Oil
    Spikenard Oil
    Swiss-Pine Oil
    Tangerine Oil
    Tea-Tree Oil
    Thyme Oil
    Vanilla Oil
    Verbena Oil
    Vetiver Oil
    Violet Oil
    White-Camphor Oil
    Yarrow Oil
    Ylang-Ylang Oil
    Aromatherapy
    Healing Baths For Colds
    Aromatherapy
    Herbal Cleansers
    Using Essential Oils


    AROMATHERAPY: HERBAL & CARRIER OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Almond, Sweet Oil
    Apricot Kernel Oil
    Argan Oil
    Arnica Oil
    Avocado Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Black Cumin Oil
    Black Currant Oil
    Black Seed Oil
    Borage Seed Oil
    Calendula Oil
    Camelina Oil
    Castor Oil
    Coconut Oil
    Comfrey Oil
    Evening Primrose Oil
    Flaxseed Oil
    Grapeseed Oil
    Hazelnut Oil
    Hemp Seed Oil
    Jojoba Oil
    Kukui Nut Oil
    Macadamia Nut Oil
    Meadowfoam Seed Oil
    Mullein Oil
    Neem Oil
    Olive Oil
    Palm Oil
    Plantain Oil
    Plum Kernel Oil
    Poke Root Oil
    Pomegranate Seed Oil
    Pumpkin Seed Oil
    Rosehip Seed Oil
    Safflower Oil
    Sea Buckthorn Oil
    Sesame Seed Oil
    Shea Nut Oil
    Soybean Oil
    St. Johns Wort Oil
    Sunflower Oil
    Tamanu Oil
    Vitamin E Oil
    Wheat Germ Oil





    HELPFUL RELATED MOONDRAGON NUTRITION BASICS LINKS

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Amino Acids Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Antioxidants Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Enzymes Information
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Herbs Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Homeopathics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Hydrosols Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Minerals Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Mineral Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary & Cosmetic Supplements Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary Supplements Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Specialty Supplements
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Introduction


  • NUTRITION BASICS ARTICLES

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: 4 Basic Nutrients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Foods That Contain Additives & Artificial Ingredients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Is Aspartame A Safe Sugar Substitute?
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Guidelines For Selecting & Preparing Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Destroy
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Heal
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: The Micronutrients: Vitamins & Minerals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Overcooking Your Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Phytochemicals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Increase Your Consumption of Raw Produce
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Limit Your Use of Salt
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Use Proper Cooking Utensils
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Choosing The Best Water & Types of Water





  • RELATED MOONDRAGON HEALTH LINKS & INFORMATION

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Analysis Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Diet Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Recipe Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Therapy: Preparing Produce for Juicing
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Additives Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Safety Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Articles
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Back Pain
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Labor & Birth
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Blending Chart
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Essential Oil Details
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Miscarriage
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Post Partum
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Childbearing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Problems in Pregnancy & Birthing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #1
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #2
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Tips
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Uses
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Information Overview
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Touch & Movement Therapies Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy: Touch & Movement: Aromatherapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Therapy: Touch & Movement - Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Therapeutic Massage
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 1
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 2
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Hydrotherapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Pain Control Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Relaxation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Steam Inhalation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy - Herbal Oils Index







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