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MoonDragon's Health & Wellness
Nutrition Basics

Herbs
WHEAT

Wheat Berry, Wheat Bran, Wheat Germ, Wheatgrass
(Triticum Aestivum, Triticum Vulgare, Triticum spp.)


"For Informational Use Only"
For more detailed information contact your health care provider
about options that may be available for your specific situation.





  • Wheat Description
  • Wheat Uses, Health Benefits & Scientific Evidence
  • Wheat Dosage Information
  • Wheat Safety, Cautions & Interactions
  • Wheat & Wheat Related Products




  • wheat field


    WHEAT DESCRIPTION

    WHEAT CEREAL GRAIN

    Wheat (Triticum spp.) is a cereal grain, originally from the Levant region of the Near East but now cultivated worldwide. In 2010, world production of wheat was 651 million tons, making it the third most-produced cereal after maize (844 million tons) and rice (672 million tons). Wheat was the second most-produced cereal in 2009; world production in that year was 682 million tons, after maize (817 million tons), and with rice as a close third (679 million tons). This grain is grown on more land area than any other commercial food. World trade in wheat is greater than for all other crops combined. Globally, wheat is the leading source of vegetable protein in human food, having a higher protein content than other major cereals, maize (corn) or rice. In terms of total production tonnages used for food, it is currently second to rice as the main human food crop and ahead of maize, after allowing for maize's more extensive use in animal feeds.

    Wheat was a key factor enabling the emergence of city-based societies at the start of civilization because it was one of the first crops that could be easily cultivated on a large scale, and had the additional advantage of yielding a harvest that provides long-term storage of food. Wheat contributed to the emergence of city-states in the Fertile Crescent, including the Babylonian and Assyrian empires. Wheat grain is a staple food used to make flour for leavened, flat and steamed breads, biscuits, cookies, cakes, breakfast cereal, pasta, noodles, couscous and for fermentation to make beer, other alcoholic beverages, or biofuel.

    Wheat contains a variety of vitamins, minerals, and trace elements. In Wheatgrass juice form it contains 70-percent chlorophyll, which is said to closely resemble the molecules of human red blood cells. Dr. Ann Wigmore, an educator and founder of the Hippocrates Health Institute in Boston, popularized it as a rich nutritional food source. According to Dr. Wigmore, 1 pound of Wheatgrass is equal to nearly 25 pounds of the most nutritious vegetables.

    wheat stalks


    WHEAT CLASSIFICATIONS

    There are six wheat classifications:
    • Hard Red Winter Wheat: Hard, brownish, mellow high-protein wheat used for bread, hard baked goods and as an adjunct in other flours to increase protein in pastry flour for pie crusts. Some brands of unbleached all-purpose flours are commonly made from hard red winter wheat alone. It is primarily traded on the Kansas City Board of Trade. One variety is known as "turkey red wheat", and was brought to Kansas by Mennonite immigrants from Russia.

    • Hard Red Spring Wheat: Hard, brownish, high-protein wheat used for bread and hard baked goods. Bread Flour and high-gluten flours are commonly made from hard red spring wheat. It is primarily traded at the Minneapolis Grain Exchange.

    • Soft Red Winter Wheat: Soft, low-protein wheat used for cakes, pie crusts, biscuits, and muffins. Cake flour, pastry flour, and some self-rising flours with baking powder and salt added, for example, are made from soft red winter wheat. It is primarily traded on the Chicago Board of Trade.

    • Durum (Hard) Wheat: Very hard, translucent, light-colored grain used to make semolina flour for pasta and bulghur; high in protein, specifically, gluten protein.

    • Hard White Wheat: Hard, light-colored, opaque, chalky, medium-protein wheat planted in dry, temperate areas. Used for bread and brewing.
    • Soft White Wheat: Soft, light-colored, very low protein wheat grown in temperate moist areas. Used for pie crusts and pastry. Pastry flour, for example, is sometimes made from soft white winter wheat.
    The hard wheats have the most amount of gluten and are used for making bread, rolls and all-purpose flour. The soft wheats are used for making flat bread, cakes, pastries, crackers, muffins, and biscuits. Red wheats may need bleaching; therefore, white wheats usually command higher prices than red wheats on the commodities market.

    Raw wheat can be ground into flour or, using hard durum wheat only, can be ground into semolina; germinated and dried creating malt; crushed or cut into cracked wheat; parboiled (or steamed), dried, crushed and de-branned into bulgur also known as groats. If the raw wheat is broken into parts at the mill, as is usually done, the outer husk or bran can be used several ways. Wheat is a major ingredient in such foods as bread, porridge, crackers, biscuits, Muesli, pancakes, pies, pastries, cakes, cookies, muffins, rolls, doughnuts, gravy, boza (a fermented beverage), and breakfast cereals (e.g., Wheatena, Cream of Wheat, Shredded Wheat, and Wheaties).

    Wheat is planted to a limited extent as a forage crop for livestock, although the straw cannot be used as feed. Its straw can be used as a construction material for roofing thatch. The whole grain can be milled to leave just the endosperm for white flour. The by-products of this are bran and germ. The whole grain is a concentrated source of vitamins, minerals, and protein, while the refined grain is mostly starch.

    There are many botanical classification systems used for wheat species. The name of a wheat species from one information source may not be the name of a wheat species in another. Within a species, wheat cultivars are further classified by wheat breeders and farmers in terms of:
    • Growing season, such as winter wheat vs. spring wheat.
    • Protein content. Bread wheat protein content ranges from 10% in some soft wheats with high starch contents, to 15% in hard wheats.
    • The quality of the wheat protein gluten. This protein can determine the suitability of a wheat to a particular dish. A strong and elastic gluten present in bread wheats enables dough to trap carbon dioxide during leavening, but elastic gluten interferes with the rolling of pasta into thin sheets. The gluten protein in durum wheats used for pasta is strong but not elastic.
    • Grain color (red, white or amber). Many wheat varieties are reddish-brown due to phenolic compounds present in the bran layer which are transformed to pigments by browning enzymes. White wheats have a lower content of phenolics and browning enzymes, and are generally less astringent in taste than red wheats. The yellowish color of durum wheat and semolina flour made from it is due to a carotenoid pigment called lutein, which can be oxidized to a colorless form by enzymes present in the grain.

    MAJOR CULTIVATED WHEAT SPECIES

    Hexaploid Species
    • Common Wheat or Bread Wheat (T. aestivum): A hexaploid species that is the most widely cultivated in the world.
    • Spelt (T. spelta): Another hexaploid species cultivated in limited quantities. Spelt is sometimes considered a subspecies of the closely related species common wheat (T. aestivum), in which case its botanical name is considered to be Triticum aestivum subsp. spelta.

    Tetraploid Species
    • Durum (T. durum): The only tetraploid form of wheat widely used today, and the second most widely cultivated wheat.
    • Emmer (T. dicoccon): A tetraploid species, cultivated in ancient times but no longer in widespread use.

    Diploid Species
    • Einkorn (T. monococcum): A diploid species with wild and cultivated variants. Domesticated at the same time as emmer wheat, but never reached the same importance.

    WHEAT NUTRIENT COMPOSITION

    100 g (3.5 oz) of hard red winter wheat contain about 12.6 g (0.44 oz) of protein, 1.5 g (0.053 oz) of total fat, 71 g (2.5 oz) of carbohydrate (by difference), 12.2 g (0.43 oz) of dietary fiber, and 3.2 mg (0.00011 oz) of iron (17% of the daily requirement); the same weight of hard red spring wheat contains about 15.4 g (0.54 oz) of protein, 1.9 g (0.067 oz) of total fat, 68 g (2.4 oz) of carbohydrate (by difference), 12.2 g (0.43 oz) of dietary fiber, and 3.6 mg (0.00013 oz) of iron (20% of the daily requirement).

    Much of the carbohydrate fraction of wheat is starch. Wheat starch is an important commercial product of wheat, but second in economic value to wheat gluten. The principal parts of wheat flour are gluten and starch. These can be separated in a kind of home experiment, by mixing flour and water to form a small ball of dough, and kneading it gently while rinsing it in a bowl of water. The starch falls out of the dough and sinks to the bottom of the bowl, leaving behind a ball of gluten.

    In wheat, phenolic compounds are mainly found in the form of insoluble bound ferulic acid and are relevant to resistance to wheat fungal diseases. Alkylresorcinols are phenolic lipids present in high amounts in the bran layer (e.g. pericarp, testa and aleurone layers) of wheat and rye (0.1 to 0.3% of dry weight).

    wheat plant and kernel


    WHEATBERRY

    A wheatberry or wheat berry is an entire wheat kernel (except for the hull), composed of the bran, germ, and endosperm. Wheatberries have a tan to reddish brown color and are available as either a hard or soft processed grain[clarify]. They are often added to salads or baked into bread to add a crunchy texture. If wheat berries are milled, whole-wheat flour is produced.

    Wheatberries are the primary ingredient in an Eastern European Christmas porridge called kutya. In France, cooked wheatberries are commonly eaten as a side dish instead of rice or corn. This side dish is often called Ebly, from the name of the first brand of cooked wheatberries. In 2014, McDonalds offered an Ebly salad for its upscale menu in Switzerland.

    WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR

    Whole-wheat flour (known as wholemeal flour in the UK) is a powdery substance, a basic food ingredient, derived by grinding or mashing the whole grain of wheat, also known as the wheatberry. Whole-wheat flour is used in baking of breads and other baked goods, and also typically mixed with other lighter "white" unbleached or bleached flours (that have been treated with flour bleaching agent(s)) to restore nutrients to the white flours (especially fiber, protein, and vitamins), texture, and body that are lost in milling and other processing to the finished baked goods or other food(s).

    The word "whole" refers to the fact that all of the grain (bran, germ, and endosperm) is used and nothing is lost in the process of making the flour. This is in contrast to white, refined flours, which contain only the endosperm. Because the whole flour contains the remains of all of the grain, it has a textured, brownish appearance.

    The benefits of whole-grain. whole wheat flour is a full-flavored flour containing vitamins, minerals and protein. Whole-grain whole wheat flour is more nutritious than refined white flour, although white flour may, in a process called food fortification, have some micronutrients lost in processing added back to the white flour (required by law in some jurisdictions). Fortified white wheat flour does not, however, contain the macronutrients of the wheat's bran and germ (especially fiber and protein) like whole-grain flour does, and is notably lacking in fiber. Whole grain is a good source of calcium, iron, fiber, and other minerals like selenium.

    Drawbacks of whole-wheat flour are that it has a shorter shelf life than white flour, as the higher oil content leads to rancidification if not stored properly, such as with refrigeration, or in other cool areas. Often, whole wheat flour is not the main ingredient in baked goods, as it may add a certain "heaviness" that prevents them from rising as high as white flours. This can add to the cost per volume of the baked item, as it requires more flour to obtain the same volume, due to the fewer and smaller air pockets trapped in the raised goods. Thus, many baked goods advertised as whole-wheat are not entirely whole-wheat; they may contain some refined white wheat, as long as the majority of the wheat used is whole-wheat.

    Nevertheless, it is possible to make a high-rising, light loaf of 100% whole-wheat bread, as long as one increases the water content of the dough (the bran and germ in whole wheat absorb more water than plain white flour), kneads the dough for a longer period of time to develop the gluten adequately, and allows for a longer rise before shaping the dough. Some bakers let the dough rise twice before shaping. The addition of fats, such as butter or oil, and milk products (fresh milk, powdered milk, buttermilk, yogurt, etc.) can also greatly assist the dough in rising.

    WHITE WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR

    White whole-wheat flour is flour milled from hard white spring wheat, rather than traditional red wheat. In the United Kingdom, whole-wheat flour is more commonly made from white wheat instead of red as in the United States and sold as Wholemeal Flour. The difference is that soft white wheat has a lower gluten content and also lacks the tannins and phenolic acid that red wheat contain, causing white whole wheat to appear and taste more like refined red wheat; it is whitish in color and does not taste bitter. White whole wheat has almost the same nutrient content as red whole wheat. However, soft white whole wheat has a lower gluten content and contains a lower protein content (between 9 and 11-percent) when compared with harder wheats like red (15 to 16-percent protein content) or golden wheat.

    WHEAT BRAN

    Bran, also known as miller's bran, is the hard outer layers of cereal grain. It consists of the combined aleurone and pericarp. Along with germ, it is an integral part of whole grains, and is often produced as a by-product of milling in the production of refined grains. When bran is removed from grains, the grains lose a portion of their nutritional value. Bran is present in and may be milled from any cereal grain, including rice, corn (maize), wheat, oats, barley and millet. Bran should not be confused with chaff, which is coarser scaly material surrounding the grain, but not forming part of the grain itself.

    Bran is particularly rich in dietary fiber and essential fatty acids and contains significant quantities of starch, protein, vitamins, dietary minerals and phytic acid, which is an antinutrient that prevents nutrient absorption. The high oil content of bran makes it subject to rancidification, one of the reasons that it is often separated from the grain before storage or further processing. The bran itself can be heat-treated to increase its longevity.

    NUTRIENTS (%)
    WHEAT
    RYE
    OAT
    RICE
    BARLEY
    Carbohydrates
    Without Starch
    45 to 50
    50 to 70
    16 to 34
    18 to 23
    70 to 80
    Starch
    13 to 18
    12 to 15
    18 to 45
    18 to 30
    8 to 11
    Proteins
    15 to 18
    8 to 9
    13 to 20
    15 to 18
    11 to 15
    Fats
    4 to 5
    4 to 5
    6 to 11
    18 to 23
    1 to 2


    WHEAT GERM

    Nutritionally speaking, wheat germ is one of the most valuable products available. It is the smallest part of the whole grain, which is made up of 4 parts:
    • The husk (outer layer)
    • The bran (a nutritious, high fiber part of the grain)
    • The endosperm (the largest part of the grain, used in processed grain foods)
    • The germ (the smallest part of the grain, packed with nutrients)

    wheat germ kernel


    Wheat germ may be ingested in several forms:
    • Flakes: Add 2 tablespoons sprinkled on cereal, yogurt, juice, salads.
    • Oil: Wheat germ oil is rich in vitamin E, linoleic acids and phospholipids. Add 2 teaspoons of Wheat Germ oil to salads daily. It can be applied directly on the skin to prevent wrinkles.
    • Capsules: If you do not like the taste of the oil but want its benefits, buy capsules of Wheat Germ oil and take it this way. For the recommended dose read the container.

    Cereals have formed a very important part in the diet of human beings throughout history. With respect to wheat, traders needed to store wheat flour and its products for prolonged periods of time so they opted for removing the germ and bran. By eliminating these components, the wheat flour lasts longer. The problem is that linoleic and linolenic acids, proteins, and vitamin E are also removed.

    Probably one of the best things about Wheat Germ, especially as you get older and your digestive system starts to slow down, is that it is an excellent source of fiber. Eating Wheat Germ on a regular basis, as well as eating other fiber rich foods, is an excellent way to stay regular and avoid things like constipation, or worse, a blocked colon.

    Wheat Germ For Women: Women especially benefit from taking Wheat Germ as it helps alleviate premenstrual symptoms and also menopausal symptoms. The minerals in wheat germ are also excellent for promoting healthy skin, nails and hair. Women also benefit from having stronger bones and teeth. Also, studies show that eating Wheat Germ helps prevent certain types of birth defects.

    Wheat Germ For Toddlers: Wheat Germ is an incredibly healthy ingredient that provides a massive nutritional boost to your baby's meals with a subtle flavor the baby would not even notice it. When your baby is about 9 months old, you may begin to introduce wheat products such as Wheat Germ. Note: Before including Wheat Germ (which contains gluten). or any other wheat products into your baby's diet, be sure to consult with your baby's health care practitioner as your baby may have a special situation and the general recommendations may not apply. Wheat Germ provides more nutrients per ounce than any other grain or vegetable. By adding it to your baby's diet, you are providing him or her with these nutrients:
    • Folic Acid
    • Phosphorus (needed for healthy teeth and bones)
    • Fiber (needed for colon health and prevention of constipation)
    • Vitamin A
    • Vitamins B-1 and B-3
    • Vitamin B-5 (otherwise known as Pantothenic Acid, which helps the body assimilate energy from food)
    • Vitamin E (which strengthens the immune system)
    • Protein (the Protein content of wheat germ is actually higher than most meats)
    • Iron
    • Potassium
    • Riboflavin
    • Calcium
    • Magnesium
    • Zinc

    This list is by no means all inclusive. A regular diet of Wheat Germ will also give you more strength and energy, keeps your cholesterol at normal levels and also helps prevent illness. Wheat germ, in any form is a great source of many nutrients important for maintaining good health.

    wheat germ oil


    WHEAT GERM OIL

    Wheat Germ oil is obtained from the embryo or kernel of the wheat grain. It is extracted from the germ of the wheat kernel. Although germ makes up only about 2.5 to 3 percent by weight of the kernel, the benefits of wheat germ stem from the fact that it contains almost 25 percent of the total proteins, vitamins and minerals of the wheat grain.

    The oil is the richest source of Vitamin E known to date than any other vegetable oil or food that has not undergone prior preparation or vitamin fortification. In 1988, the American Journal of Epidemiology published that regular intake of vitamin E protects against cancer. Another benefit of vitamin E is that it serves as a protector of cellular metabolism, giving a longer life to tissues thus slowing the aging process.

    Other health benefits of vitamin E are:
    • Vitamin E helps to treat infertility. A deficiency of vitamin E in women causes irregular periods and increases the risk of abortion. In men, it causes reduced sperm mobility.
    • Vitamin E protects cell membranes from oxidation and harmful free radicals.
    • Vitamin E blocks the process by which nitrites used as preservatives in foods form tumors.

    Wheat Germ oil is also a high content of Vitamin A and Vitamin D. It is rich in Protein and Lecithin.

    Wheat Germ oil is a light yellow, fat soluble natural oil and is particularly high in octacosanol. This is a 28-carbon long-chain saturated primary alcohol found in a number of different vegetable waxes. Octacosanol has been studied as an exercise- and physical performance-enhancing agent. Very long chain fatty alcohols obtained from plant waxes and beeswax have been reported to lower plasma cholesterol in humans. As a cooking oil, Wheat Germ oil is strongly flavored, expensive and easily perishable. Wheat Germ oil contains the following fatty acids:

    COMPONENT
    g / 100 g
    Linoleic Acid (Omega-6)
    55
    Palmitic Acid
    16
    Oleic Acid
    14
    Linolenic Acid (Omega-3)
    7


    wheatgrass


    WHEATGRASS

    Wheatgrass is a member of the family Poaceae, which includes a wide variety of wheat-like grasses. Wheatgrass is commonly found in temperate regions of Europe and the United States. It can be grown outdoors or indoors. The roots and underground stems may be used in herbal remedies.

    Wheatgrass is the freshly sprouted shoots of grains of wheat. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, it is used interchangeably with barley grass. Wheat grass is grown by soaking the seeds in clean water for 6 to 12 hours until they sprout and grow shoots approximately 2 inches (5 cm) long. Barley grass provides a broader ranger of nutrients, but wheat grass has a superior content of antioxidants and organic phosphates. Wheatgrass sprouting seeds themselves are a wonderful addition to any diet.

    wheatgrass and juice


    SPROUTING INSTRUCTIONS

    As above, soak the seeds for 6 to 12 hours, rinse the water out, and dry thoroughly.
    This should be repeated at least 3 times, but may be repeated more if you want your seeds to get larger.
    Make sure they are very dry the last round of soak/rinse as they will keep better in the refrigerator the dryer to the touch that they are.

    Wheatgrass is a nutrient-rich type of young grass in the wheat family. It is sold as a dietary supplement in tablet, capsule, powder and liquid forms. Wheatgrass if often used for juicing, or added to smoothies or tea. Proponents say that wheatgrass has numerous benefits and provides a concentrated amount of nutrients, including iron, calcium, magnesium, amino acids, chlorophyll, and vitamins A, C, and E. Wheatgrass provides a rich nutrient content that boosts immunity, kills harmful bacteria in the digestive system and helps rid the body of waste and is considered an amazing blood purifier. Wheatgrass has been used as a treatment for cancer, ulcerative colitis and joint pain, among other health concerns.

    Wheatgrass constituents are quercetin, rutin, organic phosphates. Parts used are the dried unjointed leaf. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, wheatgrass may be "massed" or fermented before drying. Wheat sprouts contain a very high level of organic phosphates and a powerful cocktail of antioxidant molecules. According to research recently published in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, the antioxidant activity of catalase and peroxidase appears very strong.

    Dr. Wigmore reported that wheatgrass therapy, along with "living foods," helped to eliminate cancerous growths and helped many other disorders, including mental health problems. The molecular structure of chlorophyll resembles that of hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein of red blood cells, and this may be the reason for the effectiveness of wheatgrass. The key difference between the two is that the hemoglobin is iron, while the metallic atom at the center of a molecule of chlorophyll is magnesium. In experiments on anemic animals, blood counts returned to normal after four to five days of receiving chlorophyll.





    wheat


    WHEAT USES, HEALTH BENEFITS & SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE

    FORM-DEPENDENT BENEFITS

    The health benefits of wheat depends entirely on the form in which you eat it. These benefits will be few if you select wheat that has been processed into sixty-percent extraction, bleached white flour. Sixty-percent extraction is the standard for most wheat products in the United States, including breads, noodles and pastas, baked goods like rolls or biscuits, and cookies. This means that forty percent of the original wheat grain was removed, and only sixty percent is left. Unfortunately, the forty percent that gets removed includes the bran and the germ of the wheat grain - its most nutrient-rich parts. In the process of making sixty-percent extraction flour, over half of the vitamin B-1, B-2, B-3, E, folic acid, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, iron, and fiber are lost.

    Since 1941, laws in the United States have required "enrichment" of processed wheat flour with vitamins B-1, B-2, B-3 and iron in response to the problems created by sixty-percent extraction. Since not nearly as much of these B vitamins and iron are replaced as are removed from sixty-percent extraction flour, "enriched" seems an insufficiently odd word to describe this process.

    If you select one-hundred-percent whole wheat products, however, the bran and the germ of the wheat will remain in your meals, and the health benefits will be much more nutritionally impressive. Whole wheat (in its original non-enriched form) as a very good source of dietary fiber and manganese, and as a good source of magnesium.

    WHOLE GRAINS & HEALTHY WEIGHT

    A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition underscores the importance of choosing whole rather than refined wheat to maintain a healthy body weight. In this Harvard Medical School / Brigham and Women's Hospital study, which collected data on over 74,000 female nurses aged 38 to 63 years over a 12 year period, weight gain was inversely associated with the intake of high-fiber, whole-grain foods, such as whole wheat, but positively related to the intake of refined-grain foods, such as products made from refined wheat. Not only did women who consumed more whole grains consistently weigh less than those who ate less of these fiber-rich foods, but those consuming the most dietary fiber from whole grains were forty-nine-percent less likely to gain weight compared to those eating foods made from refined grains.

    WHOLE GRAINS & METABOLIC SYNDROME RISK REDUCTION

    Whole grains help reduce the risk of metabolic syndrome. We are told not to eat fat and we would stay trim followed by an increase in obesity. Then we are told by food professionals that eating fat is fine, but we should avoid carbohydrates to stay slim. Neither piece of advice appears to be complete or likely to help us to obtain and maintain a healthy weight and general good health. Different kinds of fats have different effects in our bodies (e.g., saturated and trans fats are linked to increased risk for cardiovascular disease while omega-3 fats decrease cardiovascular disease risk), some carbohydrates, such as whole grains, are healthful while others, such as refined grains and the foods made from them, are not.

    The latest research is clearly supporting this vital distinction. Refined grains and the foods made from them (e.g., white breads, cookies, pastries, pasta and rice) are now being linked not only to weight gain but to increased risk of insulin resistance (the precursor of type 2 diabetes) and the metabolic syndrome (a strong predictor of both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease), while eating more wholegrain foods is being shown to protect against all these ills. Common features of the metabolic syndrome include visceral obesity (the "apple shaped" body), low levels of protective HDL cholesterol, high triglycerides, and high blood pressure. In one of the most recent studies, which appeared in Diabetes Care, researchers who analyzed data on over 2,800 participants in the Framingham Offspring Study, found that the prevalence of both insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome was significantly lower among those eating the most cereal fiber from whole grains compared to those eating the least.

    Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 38-percent lower among those with the highest intake of fiber from whole grains. Conversely, study subjects whose diets had the highest glycemic index and glycemic load, both of which are typically low in whole foods and high in processed refined foods, were 141-percent more likely to have the metabolic syndrome compared to those whose diets had the lowest glycemic index and glycemic load. In other words, compared to those whose diets were primarily composed of whole high fiber foods: whole grains, legumes, vegetables and fruits.

    The researchers concluded that given both a high cereal fiber content and lower glycemic index are attributes of wholegrain foods, the recommendation to increase wholegrain intake may reduce the risk of developing the metabolic syndrome. Eating properly relies on the healthiest foods from all the food groups, the whole foods that contain the healthiest fats, carbohydrates and proteins, is the most effective, intelligent, and most enjoyable way to not only lower your risk of developing the metabolic syndrome, but to stay slim, vital and attractive throughout a long and healthy life.

    WHOLE GRAINS & TYPE 2 DIABETES LOWERED RISK

    Whole grains are a rich source of magnesium, a mineral that acts as a co-factor for more than 300 enzymes, including enzymes involved in the body's use of glucose and insulin secretion. The FDA permits foods that contain at least 51-percent whole grains by weight (and are also low in fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol) to display a health claim stating consumption is linked to lower risk of heart disease and certain cancers. Now, research suggests regular consumption of whole grains also reduces risk of type 2 diabetes. In this 8-year trial, involving 41,186 particpants of the Black Women's Health Study, research data confirmed inverse associations between magnesium, calcium and major food sources in relation to type 2 diabetes that had already been reported in predominantly white populations. Risk of type 2 diabetes was 31-percent lower in black women who frequently ate whole grains compared to those eating the least of these magnesium-rich foods.

    When the women's dietary intake of magnesium intake was considered by itself, a beneficial, but lesser-19-percent-reduction in risk of type 2 diabetes was found, indicating that whole grains offer special benefits in promoting healthy blood sugar control. Daily consumption of low-fat dairy foods was also helpful, lowering risk of type 2 diabetes by 13-percent.

    WHOLE WHEAT & CHRONIC INFLAMMATION

    Betaine in whole wheat lessens chronic inflammation. People whose diets supplied the highest average intake of choline (found in egg yolk and soybeans), and its metabolite betaine (found naturally in beets, spinach and whole wheat), have levels of inflammatory markers at least 20-percent lower than subjects with the lowest average intakes, report Greek researchers in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

    Compared to those whose diets contained less than 250 mg per day of choline, subjects whose diets supplied greater than 310 mg of choline daily had, on average 22-percent lower concentrations of C-reactive protein, 26-percent lower concentrations of interleukin-6, and 6-percent lower concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    Compared to those consuming less than 260 mg per day of betaine, subjects whose diets provided greater than 360 mg per day of betaine had, on average 10-percent lower concentrations of homocysteine, 19-percent lower concentrations of C-reactive protein, and 12-percent lower concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha. Each of these markers of chronic inflammation has been linked to a wide range of conditions including heart disease, osteoporosis, cognitive decline and Alzheimer's, and type-2 diabetes.

    In an accompanying editorial in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition entitled, "Is there a new component of the Mediterranean diet that reduces inflammation?," Steven Zeisel from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill noted that choline and betaine work together in the cellular process of methylation, which is not only responsible for the removal of homocysteine, but is involved in turning off the promoter regions of genes involved in inflammation. "Exposure to oxidative stress is a potent trigger for inflammation. Betaine is formed from choline within the mitochondria, and this oxidation contributes to mitochondrial redox status," Zeisel continued. "If the association between choline and betaine and inflammation can be confirmed in studies of other populations, an interesting new dietary approach may be available for reducing chronic diseases associated with inflammation," he concluded.

    Recommended daily intakes of choline were set in 1998 at 550 mg per day for men and 425 mg a day for women. No RDI has been set for betaine, which, since it is a metabolite of choline, is not considered an essential nutrient. Egg yolks are the richest source of choline, followed by soybeans. Spinach, beets and whole wheat products are primary sources of betaine.

    WHOLE GRAINS & GALLSTONE PREVENTION

    Whole grains may help prevent gallstones. Eating foods high in insoluble fiber, such as cereals and breads made from whole wheat, can help women avoid gallstones, shows a study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology. Studying the overall fiber intake and types of fiber consumed over a 16 year period by over 69,000 women in the Nurses Health Study, researchers found that those consuming the most fiber overall (both soluble and insoluble) had a 13-percent lower risk of developing gallstones compared to women consuming the fewest fiber-rich foods. Those eating the most foods rich in insoluble fiber gained even more protection against gallstones: a 17-percent lower risk compared to women eating the least. And the protection was dose-related; a 5-gram increase in insoluble fiber intake dropped risk dropped 10-percent.

    Researchers think insoluble fiber not only speeds intestinal transit time (how quickly food moves through the intestines), but reduces the secretion of bile acids (excessive amounts contribute to gallstone formation), increases insulin sensitivity and lowers triglycerides (blood fats). Abundant in all whole grains, insoluble fiber is also found in nuts and the edible skin of fruits and vegetables including tomatoes, cucumbers, many squash, apples, berries, and pears. In addition, beans provide insoluble as well as soluble fiber.

    WHOLE WHEAT & COLON HEALTH

    Whole wheat helps to keep the colon functioning properly. Wheat bran is a popular bulk laxative. A third of a cup per day is all that is needed. Research studies support this popular practice. A fiber-rich diet, primarily composed of whole wheat breads, cereals high in bran and supplemental "millers bran" was shown to alleviate the symptoms of diverticular disease (pain, nausea, flatulence, distension, constipation, etc.) in 89-percent of patients enrolled in a study which examined the effects of fiber on bowel regularity. Diverticular disease, a condition often marked by inflammation and lower abdominal pains in which chronic constipation and excessive straining results in a sac or pouch in the wall of the colon, is typically treated with dietary roughage such as cereal fiber (i.e., wheat bran), fruit and vegetable fiber, and plenty of fluids.

    WHOLE WHEAT & CANCER

    Whole wheat promotes women's health and gastrointestinal health. The benefits of wheat's bran portion do not stop here; it has also been shown to function as an anti-cancer agent. Wheat bran is thought to accelerate the metabolism of estrogen that is a known promoter of breast cancer. In one study, pre-menopausal women, ages twenty to fifty, who ate three to four high fiber muffins per day made with wheat bran, decreased their blood estrogen levels by 17-percent after two months. The women eating corn bran or oat bran did not show the same benefits.

    Interestingly, whole grains such as wheat also contain lignans, which are phytonutrients that act as weak hormone-like substances. Lignans occupy the hormone receptors in the body, thus actively protecting the breast against high circulating levels of hormones such as estrogen. By accelerating the metabolism of estrogen and occupying estrogen receptors in the body, the components of wheat appear to have a dual function in protecting women against one of the leading causes of cancer death. The fact that only wheat bran, and not corn or oat bran, is beneficial in preventing cancer-promoting changes in the colon, provides additional clues that wheat bran contains something special that makes it a true cancer fighter. Only the bran from wheat has been shown to reduce the concentration of bile acids and bacterial enzymes in the stool that are believed to promote colon cancer.

    The protective dose for colon cancer may be more than 28 grams a day, since men who ate this amount had only one-third the rate of colon polyps (precancerous tumors) compared to those who ate only 17 grams per day. The amount of wheat bran needed for protection from other cancers is still unknown, but based on the health benefits of this food, it may be wise, if you are not sensitive to wheat or gluten, to include several servings of whole wheat grain foods such as bread, pasta, and bran cereals every day in your diet.

    Fiber from whole grains and fruit are protective against breast cancer. When researchers looked at how much fiber 35,972 participants in the UK Women's Cohort Study ate, they found a diet rich in fiber from whole grains, such as whole wheat, and fruit offered significant protection against breast cancer for pre-menopausal women. Pre-menopausal women eating the most fiber (greater than 30 grams daily) more than halved their risk of developing breast cancer, enjoying a 52-percent lower risk of breast cancer compared to women whose diets supplied the least fiber (less than 20 grams/day).

    Fiber supplied by whole grains offered the most protection. Pre-menopausal women eating the most whole grain fiber (at least 13 grams per day) had a 41-percent reduced risk of breast cancer, compared to those with the lowest whole grain fiber intake (4 grams or less per day). Fiber from fruit was also protective. Pre-menopausal women whose diets supplied the most fiber from fruit (at least 6 grams per day) had a 29-percent reduced risk of breast cancer, compared to those with the lowest fruit fiber intake (2 grams or less per day).

    As the following table shows, it is relatively easy to enjoy a healthy way of eating that delivers at least 13 grams of whole grain fiber and 6 grams of fiber from fruit each day.

    FOOD
    FIBER CONTENT IN GRAMS
    Oatmeal, 1 cup
    3.98
    Whole Wheat Bread, 1 Slice
    2
    Whole Wheat Spaghetti, 1 Cup
    6.3
    Brown Rice, 1 cup
    3.5
    Barley, 1 cup
    13.6
    Buckwheat, 1 cup
    4.54
    Rye, 1/3 cup
    8.22
    Corn, 1 cup
    4.6
    Apple, 1 Medium with Skin
    5.0
    Banana, 1 Medium
    4.0
    Blueberries, 1 cup
    3.92
    Orange, 1 Large
    4.42
    Pear, 1 Large
    5.02
    Prunes, 1/4 cup
    3.02
    Strawberries, 1 cup
    3.82
    Raspberries, 1cup
    8.36

    *Fiber content can vary between brands.

    Cereal and fruit fiber may be protective against postmenopausal breast cancer. Results of a prospective study involving 51,823 postmenopausal women for an average of 8.3 years showed a 34-percent reduction in breast cancer risk for those consuming the most fruit fiber compared to those consuming the least. In addition, in the subgroup of women who had ever used hormone replacement, those consuming the most fiber, especially cereal fiber, had a 50-percent reduction in their risk of breast cancer compared to those consuming the least.

    Fruits richest in fiber include apples, dates, figs, pears and prunes. When choosing a high fiber cereal, look for whole grain cereals as they supply the most bran (a mere 1/3rd cup of bran contains about 14 grams of fiber). Enjoy a cup of bulgur wheat as part of your lunch or dinner, and, for just 151 calories, you'll have consumed more than a third of your RDI for fiber.


    WHOLE GRAINS & ASTHMA

    Whole grains and fish may be highly protective against childhood asthma. According to the American Lung Association, almost 20 million Americans suffer from asthma, which is reported to be responsible for over 14 million lost school days in children, and an annual economic cost of more than $16.1 billion. Increasing consumption of whole grains and fish could reduce the risk of childhood asthma by about 50-percent, suggests the International Study on Allergy and Asthma in Childhood. The researchers, from the Dutch National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Utrecht University, University Medical Center Groningen, used food frequency questionnaires completed by the parents of 598 Dutch children aged 8 to 13 years. They assessed the children's consumption of a range of foods including fish, fruits, vegetables, dairy and whole grain products. Data on asthma and wheezing were also assessed using medical tests as well as questionnaires.

    While no association between asthma and intake of fruits, vegetables, and dairy products was found (a result at odds with other studies that have supported a link between antioxidant intake, particularly vitamins C and E, and asthma), the children's intake of both whole grains and fish was significantly linked to incidence of wheezing and current asthma. In children with a low intake of fish and whole grains, the prevalence of wheezing was almost 20-percent, but was only 4.2-percent in children with a high intake of both foods. Low intake of fish and whole grains also correlated with a much higher incidence of current asthma (16.7-percent). compared to only a 2.8-percent incidence of current asthma among children with a high intake of both foods. After adjusting results for possible confounding factors, such as the educational level of the mother, and total energy intake, high intakes of whole grains and fish were found to be associated with a 54 and 66-percent reduction in the probability of being asthmatic, respectively.

    The probability of having asthma with bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), defined as having an increased sensitivity to factors that cause narrowing of the airways, was reduced by 72 and 88-percent when children had a high-intake of whole grains and fish, respectively. The rise in the prevalence of asthma in western societies may be related to changed dietary habits. The Standard American Diet is sorely deficient in the numerous anti-inflammatory compounds found in fish and whole grains, notably, the omega-3 fats supplied by cold water fish and the magnesium and vitamin E provided by whole grains. One caution: wheat may need to be avoided as it is a common food allergen associated with asthma.

    WHEAT, ANTIOXIDANTS & PHYTOCHEMICALS

    Phytochemicals with health-promoting activity equal to or even higher thant that of vegetables and fruits. Research reported at the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) International Conference on Food, Nutrition and Cancer, by Rui Hai Liu, M.D., Ph.D., and his colleagues at Cornell University shows that whole grains, such as whole wheat, contain many powerful phytonutrients whose activity has gone unrecognized because research methods have overlooked them. Despite the fact that for years researchers have been measuring the antioxidant power of a wide array of phytonutrients, they have typically measured only the "free" forms of these substances, which dissolve quickly and are immediately absorbed into the bloodstream. They have not looked at the "bound" forms, which are attached to the walls of plant cells and must be released by intestinal bacteria during digestion before they can be absorbed.

    Phenolics, powerful antioxidants that work in multiple ways to prevent disease, are one major class of phytonutrients that have been widely studied. Included in this broad category are such compounds as quercetin, curcumin, ellagic acid, catechins, and many others that appear frequently in the health news. When Dr. Liu and his colleagues measured the relative amounts of phenolics, and whether they were present in bound or free form, in common fruits and vegetables like apples, red grapes, broccoli and spinach, they found that phenolics in the "free" form averaged 76-percent of the total number of phenolics in these foods. In whole grains, however, "free" phenolics accounted for less than one-percent of the total, while the remaining 99-percent were in "bound" form.

    In his presentation, Dr. Liu explained that because researchers have examined whole grains with the same process used to measure antioxidants in vegetables and fruits - looking for their content of "free" phenolics - the amount and activity of antioxidants in whole grains has been vastly underestimated. Despite the differences in fruits', vegetables' and whole grains' content of "free" and "bound" phenolics, the total antioxidant activity in all three types of whole foods is similar, according to Dr. Liu's research. His team measured the antioxidant activity of various foods, assigning each a rating based on a formula (micromoles of vitamin C equivalent per gram). Broccoli and spinach measured 80 and 81, respectively; apple and banana measured 98 and 65; and of the whole grains tested, corn measured 181, whole wheat 77, oats 75, and brown rice 56.

    Dr. Liu's findings may help explain why studies have shown that populations eating diets high in fiber-rich whole grains consistently have lower risk for colon cancer, yet short-term clinical trials that have focused on fiber alone in lowering colon cancer risk, often to the point of giving subjects isolated fiber supplements, yield inconsistent results. The explanation is most likely that these studies have not taken into account the interactive effects of all the nutrients in whole grains - not just their fiber, but also their many phytonutrients. As far as whole grains are concerned, Dr. Liu believes that the key to their powerful cancer-fighting potential is precisely their wholeness. A grain of whole wheat consists of three parts - its endosperm (starch), bran and germ. When wheat, or any whole grain, is refined, its bran and germ are removed. Although these two parts make up only 15 to 17-percent of the grain's weight, they contain 83-percent of its phenolics. Dr. Liu says his recent findings on the antioxidant content of whole grains reinforce the message that a variety of foods should be eaten good health. "Different plant foods have different phytochemicals," he said. "These substances go to different organs, tissues and cells, where they perform different functions. What your body needs to ward off disease is this synergistic effect - this teamwork - that is produced by eating a wide variety of plant foods, including whole grains."

    WHOLE WHEAT, LIGNANS & HEART DISEASE

    Lignans protect against heart disease. One type of phytonutrient especially abundant in whole grains including whole wheat are plant lignans, which are converted by friendly flora in our intestines into mammalian lignans, including one called enterolactone that is thought to protect against breast and other hormone-dependent cancers as well as heart disease. In addition to whole grains, nuts, seeds and berries are rich sources of plant lignans, and vegetables, fruits, and beverages such as coffee, tea and wine also contain some. When blood levels of enterolactone were measured in over 800 postmenopausal women in a Danish study published in the Journal of Nutrition, women eating the most whole grains were found to have significantly higher blood levels of this protective lignan. Women who ate more cabbage and leafy vegetables also had higher enterolactone levels.

    There are significant cardiovascular benefits for postmenopausal women. Eating a serving of whole grains, such as whole wheat, at least 6 times each week is an especially good idea for postmenopausal women with high cholesterol, high blood pressure or other signs of cardiovascular disease (CVD). A 3-year prospective study of 229 postmenopausal women with CVD, published in the American Heart Journal, shows that those eating at least 6 servings of whole grains each week experienced slowed progression of atherosclerosis, the build-up of plaque that narrows the vessels through which blood flows, and less progression in stenosis, the narrowing of the diameter of arterial passageways. The women's intake of fiber from fruits, vegetables and refined grains was not associated with a lessening in CVD progression.

    Prevent Heart Failure with a Whole Grains Breakfast

    Heart failure is the leading cause of hospitalization among the elderly in the United States. Success of drug treatment is only partial (ACE inhibitors and beta-blockers are typically used; no evidence has found statins safe or effective for heart failure), and its prognosis remains poor. Follow up of 2445 discharged hospital patients with heart failure revealed that 37.3-percent died during the first year, and 78.5-percent died within 5 years.

    Since consumption of whole grain products and dietary fiber has been shown to reduce the risk of high blood pressure and heart attack, Harvard researchers decided to look at the effects of cereal consumption on heart failure risk and followed 21,376 participants in the Physicians Health Study over a period of 19.6 years. After adjusting for confounding factors (age, smoking, alcohol consumption, vegetable consumption, use of vitamins, exercise, and history of heart disease), they found that men who simply enjoyed a daily morning bowl of whole grain (but not refined) cereal had a 29-percent lower risk of heart failure. Your heart is worth protecting, especially when the prescription - a morning bowl of hearty whole grains - is so delicious.

    WHEAT BRAN

    Bran is often used to enrich breads (notably muffins) and breakfast cereals, especially for the benefit of those wishing to increase their intake of dietary fiber. Bran may also be used for pickling (nukazuke) as in the tsukemono of Japan. In Romania, the fermented wheat bran is usually used when preparing borscht soup.

    wheat germ toasted


    WHEAT GERM PROMOTES HEALTH

    Wheat bran is not the only star when it comes to the health benefits of wheat; wheat germ definitely deserves its "health food" reputation. The germ is the vitamin and mineral rich embryo of the wheat kernel that is removed during the refining of whole wheat grains to white flour. Packed with important B-vitamins, such as folate, thiamin, and vitamin B-6, and the minerals zinc, magnesium, and manganese, wheat germ is a top-notch food that can be easily incorporated into casseroles, muffins, and pancakes or sprinkled over cereal or yogurt.

    The wheat germ also has a high oil content, and subsequently a high amount of vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant that helps protect the oil in the wheat germ from quickly becoming rancid. Vitamin E functions in a similar manner as a fat-soluble antioxidant in the human body where it helps protect fat-containing substances including cell membranes, brain cells, and fatty molecules such as cholesterol from damge by free radicals. Fats and cholesterol are very susceptible to free radical damage, a process that occurs when they are exposed to oxygen. When damaged, fats and cholesterol form toxic derivatives that, if left unchecked, can damage the structures of which they are a part and, in the case of cholesterol, contribute to the formation of atherosclerosis, a form of coronary artery disease. Vitamin E, when present in sufficient quantities, readily blocks these toxic derivatives. Vitamin E not only protects fats, cholesterol and all cell membranes from damage, it is also important for immune system function, cancer prevention and blood glucose control in both healthy and diabetic individuals.

    Wheat Germ oil is said to stimulate tissue regeneration and can help aging skin by reducing wrinkles, scars and stretch marks. It reduces moisture loss and soothes irritated, sunburned, or burned skin. It can also help treat psoriasis and eczema. Wheat germ oil is rich in vitamins A, D and E, and is often added to other oil blends because of its antioxidant properties.

    wheat germ bag


    WHOLE GRAIN HEALTH BENEFITS

  • In many studies, eating whole grains, such as whole wheat, has been linked to protection against atherosclerosis, ischemic stroke, diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity, and premature death. A new study and accompanying editorial, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition explains the likely reasons behind these findings and recommends at least 3 servings of whole grains should be eaten daily.

  • Whole grains are concentrated sources of fiber. In this meta-analysis of 7 studies including more than 150,000 persons, those whose diets provided the highest dietary fiber intake had a 29-percent lower risk of cardiovascular disease compared to those with the lowest fiber intake. But it is not just fiber's ability to serve as a bulking agent that is responsible for its beneficial effects as a component of whole grains. Wheat bran, for example, which constitutes 15-percent of most whole-grain wheat kernels but is virtually non-existent in refined wheat flour, is rich in minerals, antioxidants, lignans, and other phytonutrients, as well as in fiber.

  • In addition to the matrix of nutrients in their dietary fibers, the whole-grain arsenal includes a wide variety of additional nutrients and phytonutrients that reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Compounds in whole grains that have cholesterol-lowering effects include polyunsaturated fatty acids, oligosaccharides, plant sterols and stanols, and saponins.

  • Whole grains are also important dietary sources of water-soluble, fat-soluble, and insoluble antioxidants. The long list of cereal antioxidants includes vitamin E, tocotrieonols, selenium, phenolic acids, and phytic acid. These multifunctional antioxidants come in immediate-release to slow-release forms and thus are available throughout the gastrointestinal tract over a long period after being consumed. The high antioxidant capacity of wheat bran is 20-fold that of refined wheat flour (endosperm). Although the role of antioxidant supplements in protecting against cardiovascular disease has been questioned, prospective population studies consistently suggest that when consumed in whole foods, antioxidants are associated with significant protection against cardiovascular disease. Because free radical damage to cholesterol appears to contribute significantly to the development of atherosclerosis, the broad range of antioxidant activities from the phytonutrients abundant in whole-grains is thought to play a strong role in their cardio-protective effects.

  • Like soybeans, whole grains are important sources of phytoestrogens, plant compounds that may affect blood cholesterol levels, blood vessel elasticity, bone metabolism, and many other cellular metabolic processes.

  • Whole grains are rich sources of lignans that are converted by the human gut to enterolactone and enterodiole. In studies of Finnish men, blood levels of enterolactone have been found to have an inverse relation not just to cardiovascular-related death, but to all causes of death, which suggests that the plant lignans in whole grains may play an important role in their protective effects.

  • Lower insulin levels may also contribute to the protective effects of whole grains. In many persons, the risks of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity are linked to insulin resistance. Higher intakes of whole grains are associated with increased sensitivity to insulin in population studies and clinical trials. Whole grains improve insulin sensitivity by lowering the glycemic index of the diet while increasing its content of fiber, magnesium, and vitamin E.


  • SOURDOUGH BREAD

    Sourdough bread is considered a better source of minerals and potentially better tolerated by people with wheat-related health problems. Choosing sourdough for the best nutrition among commercially baked breads is suggested by a study published in the journal Nutrition. This animal study compared mineral absorption from different breads: reconstituted whole wheat flour (white flour plus bran, a typical formulation), yeast bread and sourdough bread. Of all three breads, not only was the content of phytate, which prevents absorption of calcium, lower in sourdough, but the absorption of iron, zinc, and copper was enhanced. Another study, published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology showed that sourdough bread fermented with the help of selected Lactobacilli, nontoxic flours, and a long fermentation time was fairly well tolerated by a group of 17 persons previously diagnosed with celiac disease. Although the purpose of this study was to help develop a prototype wheat bread product that might be tolerated by persons with wheat sensitivity, the results of this study seem promising for future attempts to prepare wheat in a natural way that may improve its tolerability.

    WHEATGRASS & CANCER

    Wheatgrass is known to be an alternative cancer therapy. Drinking it in the juice form helps your body build red blood cells which carry oxygen to every cell in your body. Increasing the oxygenation in your body will also help offset smog and carbon monoxide. Wheat grass increases your endurance during physical exercise. It also cleanses drug deposits from the body, purifies the blood and organs, and counteracts acids and toxins in the body. Wheat grass aids in the rejuvenation of the body and the metabolism of nutrients. The chlorophyll in Wheatgrass increases the body’s resistance to illness.

    WHEAT, HARD RED WINTER
    NUTRITIONAL ANALYSIS
    Nutrition Value Per 100 Grams

    (Source: USDA National Nutrient Data Base)
    Principle
    Nutrient Value
    Percentage of RDA
         Energy      327 Kcal (1,368 kj)      
         Carbohydrates      71.18 g      
         Sugars      0.41 g      
         Protein      12.61 g      
         Total Fat      1.54 g      
         Cholesterol      0 mg      
         Dietary Fiber      12.2 g      
    Vitamins
    Nutrient Value
    Percentage of RDA
         Folates (B-9)      38 mcg      10%
         Niacin (B-3)      5.464 mg      36%
         Pantothenic Acid (B-6)      0.954 mg      19%
         Pyridoxine (B-6)      0.3 mg      23%
         Riboflavin (B-2)      0.115 mg      10%
         Thiamin (B-1)      0.383 mg      33%
         Vitamin E      1.01 mg      7%
         Vitamin K      1.9 µg      2%
    Electrolytes
    Nutrient Value
    Percentage of RDA
         Sodium      2 mg      0%
         Potassium      363 mg      8%
    Minerals
    Nutrient Value
    Percentage of RDA
         Calcium      29 mg      3%
         Iron      3.19 mg      25%
         Magnesium      126 mg      35%
         Manganese      3.985 mg      190%
         Zinc      2.65 mg      28%
    Percent Daily Values (%DV) are for adults or children aged 4 or older, and are based on a 2,000 calorie reference diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower based on your individual needs.


    COMPARISON OF WHEAT WITH OTHER MAJOR STAPLE FOODS

    The following table shows the nutrient content of wheat and other major staple foods in a raw form. Raw forms of these staples, however, are not edible and cannot be digested. These must be sprouted, or prepared and cooked as appropriate for human consumption. In sprouted or cooked form, the relative nutritional and anti-nutritional contents of each of these grains is remarkably different from that of raw form of these grains reported in this table.

    In cooked form, the nutrition value for each staple depends on the cooking method (for example: baking, boiling, steaming, frying, etc.).

    NUTRIENT CONTENT OF MAJOR STAPLE FOODS
    STAPLE:
    Maize / Corn
    Rice
    Wheat
    Potato
    Cassava
    Soybean (Green)
    Sweet Potato
    Sorghum
    Yam
    Plantain
    Component
    (per 100 gram portion)
    Amount
    Amount
    Amount
    Amount
    Amount
    Amount
    Amount
    Amount
    Amount
    Amount
    Water (g) 10 12 13 79 60 68 77 9 70 65
    Energy (kj) 1528 1528 1369 322 670 615 360 1419 494 511
    Protein (g) 9.4 7.1 12.6 2.0 1.4 13.0 1.6 11.3 1.5 1.3
    Fat (g) 4.74 0.66 1.54 0.09 0.28 6.8 0.05 3.3 0.17 0.37
    Carbohydrates (g) 74 80 71 17 38 11 20 75 28 32
    Dietary Fiber (g) 7.3 1.3 12.2 2.2 1.8 4.2 3 6.3 4.1 2.3
    Sugar (g) 0.64 0.12 0.41 0.78 1.7 0 4.18 0 0.5 15
    Calcium (mg) 7 28 29 12 16 197 30 28 17 3
    Iron (mg) 2.71 0.8 3.19 0.78 0.27 3.55 0.61 4.4 0.54 0.6
    Magnesium (mg) 127 25 126 23 21 65 25 0 21 37
    Phosphorus (mg) 210 115 288 57 27 194 47 287 55 34
    Potassium (mg) 287 115 363 421 271 620 337 350 816 499
    Sodium (mg) 35 5 2 6 14 15 55 6 9 4
    Zinc (mg) 2.21 1.09 2.65 0.29 0.34 0.99 0.3 0 0.24 0.14
    Copper (mg) 0.31 0.22 0.43 0.11 0.10 0.13 0.15 - 0.18 0.08
    Manganese (mg) 0.49 1.09 3.99 0.15 0.38 0.55 0.26 - 0.40 -
    Selenium (µg) 15.5 15.1 70.7 0.3 0.7 1.5 0.6 0 0.7 1.5
    Vitamin C (mg) 0 0 0 19.7 20.6 29 2.4 0 17.1 18.4
    Thiamin (mg) 0.39 0.07 0.30 0.08 0.09 0.44 0.08 0.24 0.11 0.05
    Riboflavin (mg) 0.20 0.05 0.12 0.03 0.05 0.18 0.06 0.14 0.03 0.05
    Niacin (mg) 3.63 1.6 5.46 1.05 0.85 1.65 0.56 2.93 0.55 0.69
    Pantothenic Acid (mg) 0.42 1.01 0.95 0.30 0.11 0.15 0.80 - 0.31 0.26
    Vitamin B-6 (mg) 0.62 0.16 0.3 0.30 0.09 0.07 0.21 - 0.29 0.30
    Folate, Total (mg) 19 8 38 16 27 165 11 0 23 22
    Vitamin A (IU) 214 0 9 2 13 180 14187 0 138 1127
    Vitamin E
    Alpha Tocopherol (mg)
    0.49 0.11 1.01 0.01 19 0 0.26 0 0.39 0.14
    Vitamin K (µg) 0.3 0.1 1.9 1.9 1.9 0 1.8 0 2.6 0.7
    Beta Carotene (µg) 97 0 5 1 8 0 8509 0 83 457
    Zeaxanthin (µg) 1355 0 220 8 0 0 0 0 0 30
    Saturated
    Fatty Acids (g)
    0.67 0.18 0.26 0.03 0.07 0.79 0.02 0.46 0.04 0.14
    Monounsaturated
    Fatty Acids (g)
    1.25 0.21 0.2 0 0.08 1/28 0 0.99 0.01 0.03
    Polyunsaturated
    Fatty Acids (g)
    2.16 0.18 0.63 0.04 0.05 3.20 0.01 1.37 0.08 0.07





    WHEAT DOSAGE INFORMATION

    As part of your healthy way of eating, whole grains can significantly lower your risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    Enjoy at least 3 servings of whole grain products daily.

    For treating cancer and other chronic illnesses, use a Wheat grass enema consisting of 1 ounce of fresh Wheat grass juice in 1 cup of warm water.

    For other uses, read and follow product label directions.

    SELECTION & STORAGE

    Wheat flour, berries and bulgur are generally available prepackaged as well as in bulk containers. Just as with any other food that you may purchase in the bulk section, make sure that the bins containing these wheat products are covered and that the store has a good product turnover so as to ensure their maximal freshness. Whether purchasing these products in bulk or in a packaged container, make sure that there is no evidence of moisture present.

    Look for wheat germ that is packaged in sealed containers (especially those that are vacuum packaged) as they will be more protected from potential oxidation and rancidity.

    Wheat berries should be stored in an airtight container in a cool, dry and dark place. The optimal way to store wheat products such as flour, bulgur, bran and germ is in an airtight container in the refrigerator as the cooler temperature will help to prevent them from becoming rancid.

    QUICK SERVING IDEAS

  • Use whole wheat bread when you make sandwiches.
  • Wheat flakes look similar to rolled oats and can be prepared as a hot breakfast cereal.
  • Use sprouted wheat berries in vegetable and grain salads.
  • Make individual pizzas using whole wheat pita breads as the crust.
  • Whole wheat pasta has become very popular and is available in many different types (e.g., spaghetti, spirals, penne, etc.) to suit your recipe needs.





  • WHEAT SAFETY, CAUTIONS & INTERACTIONS INFORMATION

    SAFETY CONCERNS

    There are no known safety issues or interactions associated with Wheat.

    For individuals with a gluten allergy it is possible to have a reaction to Wheat products. The estimate for people in the United States is between 0.5 and 1.0 percent of the population. While gluten sensitivity is caused by a reaction to wheat proteins, it is not the same as a wheat allergy.

    Several screening studies in Europe, South America, Australasia, and the USA suggest that approximately 0.5 to 1-percent of these populations may have undetected celiac disease. Celiac disease is a condition that is caused by an adverse immune system reaction to gliadin, a gluten protein found in wheat (and similar grains of the tribe Triticeae which includes other species such as barley and rye). Upon exposure to gliadin, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase modifies the protein, and the immune system cross-reacts with the bowel tissue, causing an inflammatory reaction. That leads to flattening of the lining of the small intestine, which interferes with the absorption of nutrients. The only effective treatment is a lifelong gluten-free die

    MoonDragon's Health & Wellness Disorders: Celiac Disease


    ALLERGIC REACTIONS TO WHEAT

    Although allergic reactions can occur to virtually any food, research studies on food allergy consistently report more problems with some foods than with others. It is important to realize that the frequency of problems varies from country to country and can change significantly along with changes in the food supply or with other manufacturing practices. For example, in several part of the world, including Canada, Japan, and Israel, sesame seed allergy has risen to a level of major concern over the past 10 years.

    In the United States, beginning in 2004 with the passage of the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA), food labels have been required to identify the presence of any major food allergens. Since 90-percent of food allergies in the U.S. have been associated with 8 food types as reported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, it is these 8 food types that are considered to be major food allergens in the U.S. and require identification on food labels. The 8 food types classified as major allergens are as follows: (1) wheat, (2) cow's milk, (3) hen's eggs, (4) fish, (5) crustacean shellfish (including shrimp, prawns, lobster and crab); (6) tree nuts (including cashews, almonds, walnuts, pecans, pistachios, Brazil nuts, hazelnuts and chestnuts); (7) peanuts; and (8) soy foods.

    These foods do not need to be eaten in their pure, isolated form in order to trigger an adverse reaction. For example, yogurt made from cow's milk is also a common allergenic food, even though the cow's milk has been processed and fermented in order to make the yogurt. Ice cream made from cow's milk would be an equally good example.

    Food allergy symptoms may sometimes be immediate and specific, and can include skin rash, hives, itching, and eczema; swelling of the lips, tongue, or throat; tingling in the mouth; wheezing or nasal congestion; trouble breathing; and dizziness or lightheadedness. But food allergy symptoms may also be much more general and delayed, and can include fatigue, depression, chronic headache, chronic bowel problems (such as diarrhea or constipation), and insomnia. Because most food allergy symptoms can be caused by a variety of other health problems, it is good practice to seek the help of a healthcare provider when evaluating the role of food allergies in your health.

    MoonDragon's Health & Wellness Disorders: Allergies


    WHEAT & OXALATES

    Whole wheat (because of its concentration of the bran and germ) is among a small number of foods that contain measurable amounts of oxalates, naturally-occurring substances found in plants, animals, and human beings. When oxalates become too concentrated in body fluids, they can crystallize and cause health problems. For this reason, individuals with already existing and untreated kidney or gallbladder problems may want to avoid eating whole wheat.

    WHEAT & ACRYLAMIDES

    Whole wheat is not a concern when it comes to acrylamide, a potentially toxic and potentially cancer-causing substance. Yet, baked snack foods containing wheat and sugar, including cookies and crackers, processed foods involving toasted grains, and toasted wheat cereals, are considered among the highest risk of foods when it comes to acrylamide exposure. This is yet another reason to avoid or minimize your intake of these foods.

    RELATED LINKS

    MoonDragon's Nutrition Therapy: Juicing & Green Drinks
    MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Wheatgrass Herbal Information
    MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Wheatgerm Herbal Information
    MoonDragon's Aromatherapy: Wheatgerm Herbal Oil
    MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Barley Herbal Information
    MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Barley Grass Herbal Information





    wheat germ


    WHEAT HERBAL & RELATED PRODUCTS

  • Wheat Herbal Products
  • Wheat Bran Herbal Products
  • Wheat Germ Herbal Products

  • Wheat Germ Oil Products
  • Wheatgrass Herbal Products



  • QUALITY PRODUCTS & SUPPLEMENTS



    WHEAT HERBAL PRODUCTS

    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Cereals

    Kalyx: Puffed Wheat, Gilster Mary Lee, 6 oz. (Case of 12) (GR)
    Puffed wheat cereal is light and airy and makes a healthy way to start your day! This cereal is a good source of iron, tastes delicious with your favorite fresh fruit and contains no fat, cholesterol or sodium. Each case consists of twelve 6-ounce bags.
    Kalyx: Sugar Puffed Wheat, Gilster Mary Lee, -35 oz. (Case of 8) (GR)
    Sugar Puffed Wheat cereal has a light and airy texture with a slightly sweet taste. Every bowl of this sugar puffed wheat is full of vitamins and minerals and makes a delicious morning meal that your whole family will love! Each case consists of 8/35 ounce bags.
    Kalyx: Whole Wheat Flakes, Gilster Mary Lee, 35 oz. (Case of 4) (GR)
    Whole Wheat Flakes are a good source of iron and B Vitamins. Add a serving of fresh fruit to a bowl of these whole wheat flakes for a delicious and healthy breakfast. Each case consists of four 35-ounce bags.
    Kalyx: Plain Shredded Wheat, Gilster Mary Lee, 35 oz. (Case of 4) (GR)
    Plain shredded wheat is a spoon sized cereal perfect for scooping up a morning's worth of healthy whole wheat. Add your favorite fresh fruit to this fiber rich cereal for an extra healthy breakfast that will keep your stomach full and your taste buds happy. Each case consists of four 35-ounce bags.
    Kalyx: Frosted Shredded Wheat, Gilster Mary Lee, 35 oz. (Case of 4) (GR)
    Frosted Shredded wheat is a spoon sized cereal perfect for scooping up a morning's worth of healthy whole wheat. This cereal is lightly frosted for an extra sweet taste. This fiber rich cereal makes an extra healthy breakfast that will keep your stomach full and your taste buds begging for more. Each case consists of four 35-ounce bags.
    Kalyx: Cape Cod Cranberry Granola, New England Natural Bakers Inc, 5 lbs. (GR)
    Cape Cod Cranberry is a low fat granola loaded with berries and taste! Whole rolled oats, naturally milled sugar, whole rolled wheat, crisp brown rice, honey, sweetened cranberries, almonds and coconut make a granola that even the kids will love. Each case consists of five pounds.
    Kalyx: Cape Cod Cranberry Granola, New England Natural Bakers Inc, 25 lbs. (GR)
    Cape Cod Cranberry is a low fat granola loaded with berries and taste! Whole rolled oats, naturally milled sugar, whole rolled wheat, crisp brown rice, honey, sweetened cranberries, almonds and coconut make a granola that even the kids will love. Each case consists of twenty five pounds.
    Kalyx: Bulgur Wheat (Cereal), Bunge Milling, 50 lbs. (GR) Bulgur Wheat (Cereal) is a quick cooking form of whole wheat that has been cleaned, parboiled, dried and ground into particles. This versatile wheat has a nut like flavor and an extended shelf life that allows it to be kept fresh for a longer period of time. Bulgur Wheat has been pre-cooked and ready to eat with minimal cooking or, after soaking in water or broth, can be mixed with other ingredients without further cooking. Each case consists of fifty pounds.


    Pasta

    Kalyx: Whole Wheat Noodles, Mrs. Millers, 14 oz. (Case of 6) (GR)
    Add an extra serving of heart healthy whole grains to your daily diet with these whole wheat noodles. These versatile noodles can be used in any of your favorite pasta recipes, from casseroles to salads. Each case consists of six 14 ounce packages.
    Kalyx: Whole Wheat Noodles, Little Barn Noodles, 16 oz. (Case of 6) (GR)
    These homemade whole wheat noodles come straight from the heart of Pennsylvania Dutch Country! Use these noodles to boost the nutrition level of your favorite recipes. From traditional Italian dishes to soups and casseroles, these noodles can stand up to the challenge of any recipe! Each case consists of six 16-ounce bags.
    Kalyx: Couscous Whole Wheat Pasta, US Durum Products, 25 lbs. (GR)
    Whole wheat Couscous may look like rice, but is actually made from coarsely ground semolina pasta. This quick cooking pasta tastes great when mixed with marinated, broiled vegetables, served with curries or stir fry meals, or used as a salad topper. Each case consists of twenty five pounds.


    Snacks

    Kalyx: Whole Wheat Fig Bar, Bella Four Bakery, 12 Count (GR)
    Fig bars are moist, soft whole wheat cake bars with a sweet fig filling and makes a great on-the-go-breakfast! Try this delicious bar as an afternoon snack or as a sweet dessert treat. Each case consists of twelve count.
    Kalyx: Whole Wheat Pretzels, Uncle Henry's Pretzels, 8 lbs (GR)
    Whole Wheat pretzels are made with whole wheat flour and are then salted to perfection, making these crunchy pretzels a delicious snack for the whole family. Each case consists of eight pounds.
    Kalyx: Wheat Crackers, Dutch Valley, 1 lb. (Case of 12) (GR)
    These baked wheat crackers are great for snacking! You can also use them in your favorite recipes by simply crushing the crackers squares and using them as a crunchy breading for meats and casseroles. Each case consists of twelve one-pound bags.
    Kalyx: Wheat Crackers, Joplin Biscuit Co, 40 lbs. (GR)
    Baked wheat crackers are great for snacking! Try using them in your favorite recipes by simply crushing the crackers squares and using them as a crunchy breading for chicken. Each case consists of forty pounds.


    Gluten

    Kalyx: Wheat Gluten, Dutch Valley, 10 lbs. (GR)
    Wheat Gluten is a protein component in which wheat is used to strengthen dough and give it structure and flavor. You can combine wheat gluten with millet or corn meal to make satisfactory baked products. Use three tablespoons per loaf of bread. Each case consists of ten pounds.
    Kalyx: Wheat Gluten, Lentz Milling Co, 50 lbs. (GR)
    Wheat Gluten is a protein component in which wheat is used to strengthen dough and give it structure and flavor. You can combine wheat gluten with millet or corn meal to make satisfactory baked products. Use three tablespoons per loaf of bread. Each case consists of fifty pounds.


    Wheat Berries

    Kalyx: Bronze Chief Wheat Berries, Wheat Montana Farms, 5 lbs. (Case of 8) (GR)
    Bronze Chief Wheat Berries are high in protein and comes from Hard Red Spring Wheat. The kernels are naturally air dried for a superior baking quality and chemical free and GMO free.Each case consists of eight, five pound bags.
    Kalyx: Prairie Gold Wheat Berries, Wheat Montana Farms, 5 lbs. (Case of 8) (GR)
    Prairie Gold Wheat Berries have a natural golden color that will give your finished food products a light golden color and hint of sweet taste. This product is great for baking breads, cookies and piecrusts and is chemical and GMO free. Each case consists of eight, five pounds bags.
    Kalyx: Cracked Wheat (Coarse), Snavelys Mill, 25 lbs. (GR)
    Cracked wheat (coarse) is made from whole raw wheat kernels that are crushed or cut into smaller pieces. This product has a high nutritional value and is a great source of fiber since it includes the fiber and nutrient rich outer bran and germ of the wheat. Cracked wheat can be used as a side dish similar to rice or couscous for serving with vegetables or meat. Each case consists of twenty five pounds.
    Kalyx: Wheat Flakes (Rolled), Grain Millers, 50 lbs. (GR)
    Rolled Wheat flakes are made by conditioning, steaming and flaking pre-cleaned wheat berries. Each case consists of fifty pounds.


    Flour

    Kalyx: Whole Wheat Flour, Organic, Bobs Red Mill, 3 lb Bag (Case of 4): GR
    This 100% stone ground whole wheat flour is made from hard red U.S. dark northern spring wheat and has all of the nutritious bran and germ still intact. Each case consists of four, three pound bags.
    Kalyx: Unbleached White Flour, Organic, Bobs Red Mill, 3 lb Bag (Case of 4): GR
    This flour is freshly milled from U.S. #1 dark northern hard red spring wheat. Unbleached White Flour is made from grains in which both the bran and the germ have been removed leaving the endosperm that is then made into white flour. This flour unbromated and is the same high protein flour used by professional bakers and produces high, well-textured loaves of bread. Each case consists of four, three pound bags.


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Wheat Herbal Grocery & Gourmet Food Products

    Amazon: Hard White Wheat Berries, Organic, Bob's Red Mill, 28 oz. Pkg
    Organic white whole wheat berries. Premium quality whole grain with 6 grams fiber and 6 grams protein per serving.


    Amazon: Hard Red Spring Wheat, Bob's Red Mill, 28 oz. Pkg
    This High Protein Number 1 Dark Northern Hard Red Spring Wheat is some of the finest wheat available anywhere in the world! Whole grain wheat berries are very nutritious, containing 7 grams of protein, over 20 percent of your daily value for dietary fiber and 10 percent of your iron.


    Amazon: Soft White Wheat Berries, Bob's Red Mill, 32 oz (2 lbs) Pkg
    Soft white wheat berries. Premium quality whole grain with 6 grams fiber and 7 grams protein per serving.


    Amazon: Hard Red Wheat Berries, Wheat Grass Express, 10 lbs.
    Excellent for growing wheatgrass to juice, food storage, grinding to make flour and bread, grain, ornamental wheat grass and sprouting seed.


    Amazon: Hard Red Wheat Berries, Organic, Handy Pantry, 50 lbs.
    Certified Organic Hard Red Wheat for growing wheatgrass to juice, sprouting seed, grinding. Sprouted grain is used to make wheatgrass juice and wheat sprouts. Grinding is done to make flour and bread products. All Wheat is not equal: there is certified organic which is the same as chemical free except the wheat is grown by farmers who have not used chemicals on their land for over ten years. The difference is the certification. If a wheat is organic and you grow it in organic soil, it will have the necessary organisms in the soil to help it assimilate the minerals properly. Organic produce should also have the organism on it which produces cobalamin (B-12).


    Amazon has many more whole wheat grain products available.

  • Nutrition Basics: Wheat Herbal Information



  • WHEAT BRAN HERBAL PRODUCTS

    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Wheat Bran, Bobs Red Mill, 10 oz. (Case of 4): GR
    Wheat Bran is an excellent source of natural food fiber and provides a healthy full-bodied texture when added to baked goods or sprinkled over soups, cereals or salads. Each case consists of four, ten ounce bags.
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Bran Wild Harvest Powder, Kalyx, 1 kg (2.2 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Bran Powder, Kalyx, 1 kg (2.2 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat Bran Powder, Kalyx, 1 kg (2.2 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Bran Wild Harvest Powder, Kalyx, 5 kg (11 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Bran Powder, Kalyx, 5 kg (11 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat Bran Powder, Kalyx, 5 kg (11 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Bran Wild Harvest Powder, Kalyx, 10 kg (22 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Bran Powder, Kalyx, 10 kg (22 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat Bran Powder, Kalyx, 10 kg (22 lbs): EB
    Kalxy: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Bran Wild Harvest Powder, Kalyx, 25 kg (55 lbs): RF
    Kalxy: Baker's Bran (Wheat), Snavelys Mill, 25 lb: GR
    Bakers Bran is wheat bran with a finer particle size and is made from a mixture of premium grade hard wheat. This bran is high in fiber and will add both flavor and texture to a variety of foods including baked goods, cereal and pasta. Each case consists of twenty five pounds.
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Bran Powder, 25 kg (55 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat Bran Powder, Kalyx, 25 kg (55 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Wheat Bran Powder, Kalyx, 50 kg (110 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Bran Wild Harvest Powder, Kalyx, 100 kg (220 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Bran Powder, Kalyx, 100 kg (220 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat Bran Powder, Kalyx, 100 kg (220 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Wheat Bran Powder, Kalyx, 200 kg (440 lbs): EB


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Wheat Bran Grocery & Gourmet Food Products
    Amazon: Wheat Bran, Bobs Red Mill, 10 oz. (Pack of 4 Bags)




  • Nutrition Basics: Wheat Herbal Information



  • WHEAT GERM HERBALPRODUCTS

    MOUNTAIN ROSE HERBS PRODUCTS

    Mountain Rose Herbs: Wheat Germ Oil (Triticum Vulgare), Cold Pressed, Unrefined, Bulk Organic Carrier & Vegetable Oils
    This ultra rich, unrefined Wheat Germ oil is a great ingredient high in natural source Vitamin E, A, D, proteins, Lecithin, and Squalene. Wheat germ has been applied externally for numerous irritations including roughness of the skin, cracking, chaffing and many crafters of cosmetics use it successfully to help reverse the effects of wrinkling. The first ingredient in quality skin care products.


    STARWEST BOTANICALS PRODUCTS

    Starwest Botanicals: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, 4 fl. oz.
    Starwest Botanicals: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, 16 fl. oz.
    Starwest Botanicals: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, 1 gallon


    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Viobin, 6 Minim, 100 Gelcaps
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, Cold Processed, Now Foods, 20 Minum (1130 mg), 100 Softgels
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, High Grade Wheat Embryo, Solgar, 1130 mg, 100 Soft Gels
    HerbsPro{: Wheat Germ Oil, Viobin, 20 Minim, 100 Caps
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Viobin, 8 fl. oz.
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Viobin, 16 fl. oz.
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Now Foods, 16 fl. oz.
    Unrefined, cold processed, rich in Vitamin E and Octacosanol. Pure energy-rich oil.
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Viobin, 32 fl. oz.


    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Raw Wheat Germ, Bob's Red Mill, 12 oz. (Case of 4): GR
    Wheat Germ is the nutritional heart of the wheat berry. Add this high-quality germ to baked goods, use as a filler for meat loaves and balls or as a coating for cookies, rolls, and breads. Wheat germ can also be used in place of bread crumbs. Wheat Germ natural oils are retained in wheat germ so be sure to refrigerate this product to maintain freshness.Each case consists of four, twelve ounce bags.
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Powder (Triticum aestivum), Kalyx, 1 kg (2.2 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ (Triticum aestivum) Wild Harvest Powder, Kalyx, 1 kg (2.2 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Powder, Kalyx, 1 kg (2.2 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Germ Powder Extract 4:1, Kalyx, 1 kg (2.2 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Germ Powder, Kalyx, 5 kg (11 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Powder, Kalyx, 5 kg (11 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ (Triticum aestivum) Wild Harvest Powder, Kalyx, 5 kg (11 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Germ Powder Extract 4:1, Kalyx, 5 kg (11 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Germ Powder, Kalyx, 10 kg (22 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Powder, Kalyx, 10 kg (22 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Germ Wild Harvest Powder, Kalyx, 10 kg (22 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Germ Powder Extract 4:1, Kalyx, 10 kg (22 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ (Toasted), Tadco/Niblack, 25 lbs: GR
    Wheat Germ (Toasted) is a good source of protein, dietary fiber, vitamins and minerals. This wheat germ can be added to baked goods, dinner dishes and can even be sprinkled on top of your morning cereal. Each case consists of twenty five pounds.
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Germ Wild Harvest Powder, Kalyx, 25 kg (55 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Germ Powder, Kalyx, 25 kg (55 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Powder, Kalyx, 25 kg (55 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Germ Powder Extract 4:1, Kalyx, 25 kg (55 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Powder, Kalyx, 50 kg (110 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Germ Powder, Kalyx, 100 kg (220 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ (Triticum aestivum) Wild Harvest Powder, Kalyx, 100 kg, (220 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Germ Powder Extract 4:1, Kalyx, 100 kg (220 lbs): RF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Viobin, 340 mg, 100 Caps: HF
    Kalyx: No. 3 Wheat Germ Oil, Sonnes, 627 mg, 120 Caps: HF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Kalyx, 1,130 mg, 5,000 Softgels: GF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, Starwest Botanicals, 4 fl oz: C
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Viobin, 8 fl oz: HF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, Starwest Botanicals, 16 fl oz: C
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil Liquid Rich in Vitamin E, Viobin, 16 fl oz: HF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil Liquid, Viobin, 32 fl oz: HF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, Starwest Botanicals, 1 gallon: C
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, Starwest Botanicals, 5 gallons: C
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Certified Organic USDA/ NOP, Kalyx, 25 kg Pail (55 lbs): HP
    Kalyx: Pure Natural Wheat Germ Vitamin E Hand & Body Lotion, Jason, 8 fl oz: HF


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Wheatgerm Grocery & Gourmet Food Products
    Amazon: Wheat Germ Supplement Products
    Amazon: Wheat Germ, Natural Raw, Bob's Red Mill, 32 oz. (Single Bag)
    Amazon: Wheat Germ, Bob's Red Mill, 32 oz. (Pack of 4)
    Amazon: Wheat Germ, Original Toasted, Kretschmer, 12 oz. Jar
    Amazon: Wheat Germ, Quaker Oats Kretschmer, 20 oz. Jar
    Amazon: Wheat Germ, Fresh Raw, Fearn Nature, 10 oz. (Pack of 12 Bags)




  • Aromatherapy: Wheat Germ Herbal Oil
  • Nutrition Basics: Wheat Germ Herbal Information



  • WHEAT GERM HERBAL OIL PRODUCTS

    MOUNTAIN ROSE HERBS PRODUCTS

    Mountain Rose Herbs: Wheat Germ Oil (Triticum Vulgare), Cold Pressed, Unrefined, Bulk Organic Carrier & Vegetable Oils
    This ultra rich, unrefined Wheat Germ oil is a great ingredient high in natural source Vitamin E, A, D, proteins, Lecithin, and Squalene. Wheat germ has been applied externally for numerous irritations including roughness of the skin, cracking, chaffing and many crafters of cosmetics use it successfully to help reverse the effects of wrinkling. The first ingredient in quality skin care products.


    STARWEST BOTANICALS PRODUCTS

    Starwest Botanicals: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, 4 fl. oz.
    Starwest Botanicals: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, 16 fl. oz.
    Starwest Botanicals: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, 1 gallon


    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, Cold-Processed, Viobin, 8 fl. oz. (30871)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, Cold-Processed, Viobin, 16 fl. oz. (30978)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Now Foods, 16 fl. oz. (68876)
    Wheat Germ Oil is an original time-tested endurance supplement that has a variety of benefits. Now Foods Wheat Germ Oil is not bleached, deodorized, or hydrogenated. Each tablespoon of Now Foods Wheat Germ Oil also contains over 1000 mcg of Octacosanol. Pure energy rich oil, unrefined, cold-processed, rich in vitamin E and Octacosanol.
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, Cold-Processed, Viobin, 32 fl. oz. (30748)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Viobin, 6 Minim, 100 GelCaps (31006)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Viobin, 20 Minim, 100 GelCaps (30934)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Now Foods, 20 Minim, 100 Softgels (68875)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Country Life, 20 Minim, 100 Softgels (37593)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Solgar, 1130 mg, 100 Softgels (36907)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Natures Life, 1140 mg, 100 Softgels (89853)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Germ Oil, Sonne Products, 120 Caps (87421)


    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Viobin, 340 mg, 100 Caps: HF
    Kalyx: No. 3 Wheat Germ Oil, Sonnes, 627 mg, 120 Caps: HF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Kalyx, 1,130 mg, 5,000 Softgels: GF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, Starwest Botanicals, 4 fl oz: C
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Viobin, 8 fl oz: HF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, Starwest Botanicals, 16 fl oz: C
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil Liquid Rich in Vitamin E, Viobin, 16 fl oz: HF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil Liquid, Viobin, 32 fl oz: HF
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, Starwest Botanicals, 1 gallon: C
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Unrefined, Starwest Botanicals, 5 gallons: C
    Kalyx: Wheat Germ Oil, Certified Organic USDA/ NOP, Kalyx, 25 kg Pail (55 lbs): HP
    Kalyx: Pure Natural Wheat Germ Vitamin E Hand & Body Lotion, Jason, 8 fl oz: HF


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Wheat Germ Oil Supplement Products
    Amazon: Wheat Germ Oil Grocery & Gourmet Food Products

  • Aromatherapy: Wheat Germ Herbal Oil
  • Nutrition Basics: Wheat Germ Herbal Information



  • WHEATGRASS HERBAL PRODUCTS

    MOUNTAIN ROSE HERBS PRODUCTS

    Mountain Rose Herbs: Wheatgrass Powder (Triticum Aestivum), Certified Organic, Bulk Organic Herbs & Spices
    Mountain Rose Herbs: Wheatgrass Sprouting Seed (Triticum Aestivum), Certified Organic, Organic Sprouting Seeds


    STARWEST BOTANICALS PRODUCTS

    Starwest Botanicals: Wheatgrass Powder (Triticum Aestivum), Organic, China, 4 oz.
    Starwest Botanicals: Wheatgrass Powder (Triticum Aestivum), Organic, United States, 4 oz.
    Starwest Botanicals: Wheatgrass Powder (Triticum Aestivum), Organic, China, 1 lb.
    Starwest Botanicals: Wheatgrass Powder (Triticum Aestivum), Organic, United States, 1 lb.
    Starwest Botanicals: Wheatgrass Capsules (Triticum Aestivum), Organic, 500 mg, 100 Caps
    Starwest Botanicals: Wheatgrass Capsules (Triticum Aestivum), Organic, 500 mg, 500 Caps
    Starwest Botanicals: Wheatgrass Sprouting Seeds, Organic, 1 lb.


    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbsPro: Wheat Grass Juice, Eclectic Institute, Inc, 36 grams (73178)
    HerbsPro: Green Energy Wheat Grass Juice Powder, 100% Pure, Pines Wheat Grass, 3.5 oz. (18456)
    HerbsPro: Green Energy Barley Grass Powder, 100% Pure, Pines Wheat Grass, 3.5 oz. (18452)
    HerbsPro: Beet Juice Powder, Pines Wheat Grass, 5 oz. (48972)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Grass Juice Powder, 100% Pure, Certified Organic, Now Foods, 4 oz. (82056)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Grass Shots, Green Foods Corp, 5.3 oz. (94651)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Grass Juice Powder, Pines Wheat Grass, 8 oz. (18463)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Grass Powder, Now Foods, Organic, 9 oz. (68565)
    HerbsPro: Green Energy Wheat Grass Juice Powder, 100% Pure, Pines Wheat Grass, 10 oz. (18455)
    HerbsPro: Green Energy Barley Grass Powder, 100% Pure, Pines Wheat Grass, 10 oz. (18453)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Grass Shots, Green Foods Corp, 10.6 oz. (94652)
    HerbsPro: Wheatgrass Powder, Organic, Starwest Botanicals, 1 lb. (71361)
    HerbsPro: Green Energy Wheat Grass Juice Powder, 100% Pure, Pines Wheat Grass, 24 oz. (18454)
    HerbsPro: Green Energy Barley Grass Powder, Pines Wheat Grass, 190 Servings, 24 oz. (18451)
    HerbsPro: Wheatgrass Juice, Freeze Dried, Eclectic Institute Inc, 90 Caps (73179)
    HerbsPro: Barley Grass, Pines Wheat Grass, 250 Tabs (18449)
    HerbsPro: Barley Grass, Pines Wheat Grass, 500 Tabs (18450)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Grass, Pines Wheat Grass, 500 mg, 100 Tabs (18460)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Grass, Now Foods, 500 mg, 100 Tabs (68563)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Grass, Pines Wheat Grass, 500 mg, 250 Tabs (18461)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Grass, Pines Wheat Grass, 500 mg, 500 Tabs (18459)
    HerbsPro: Wheat Grass, Pines Wheat Grass, 500 mg, 1400 Tabs (35404)


    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Green Kamut Wheatgrass, Organic, Kosher, Pure Planet, 240 VCaps: HF
    Among nature’s most potent leafy green vegetables are the cereal grasses, unique plants that are so packed with a broad spectrum of nutrition that they are sometimes referred to as nature’s multivitamin. Pure Planet offers two non-pasteurized cereal grass juice powders, grown in organic soil, from organic seeds, using organic methods. Cultivated in the clear fresh air of high altitudes, these grasses are exposed to intense sunlight which stimulates exceptional nutrient content. Unlike tray-grown varieties, these farm-grown grasses allow deep roots to absorb more minerals, which are then absorbed by you. You will not find any fillers, sweeteners or additives of any kind in these cereal grass juice powders. You will find a wealth of easily digestible nutrients, including light weight vegetarian protein, antioxidants and digestive enzymes with anti-aging properties, alkaline potential to normalize pH and counteract the build-up of toxic acids, a wide spectrum of vitamins and minerals including calcium, iron, vitamin K, C, B-vitamins, folic acid, betacarotene, magnesium and others. A source of chlorophyll, considered essential to health by many experts, Pure Planet cereal grass juice powders detoxify the body, rebuild tissue, provide an excellent source of antioxidants, promote beneficial flora in the intestines, help normalize blood sugar, foster weight loss, oxygenate and alkalize the blood and promote radiant skin. A superfood, free of gluten, yeast, soy, corn, maltodextrin, brown rice or added sugar.
    Kalyx: International Green Duo (Wheatgrass & Alfalfa), Organic, Pines - 260 Veg Capsules: HF
    Contains two super heroe ingredients wheatgrass and alfalfa. Six "Easy-to-swallow" vegetarian capsules equals one serving of a dark green leafy vegetable.
    Kalyx: Wheatgrass, Certified Organic, Starwest Botanicals, 500 mg, 500 Caps: C
    Kalyx: Mighty Greens Superfood Blend Powder, Organic, Pines International, 8 oz: HF
    Great tasting dark green food you can mix with water or juice. Contains wheatgrass, alfalfa, hemp protein and stevia. Kids love the taste.
    Kalyx: Green Duo Powder, Organic, Pines International, 10 oz: HF
    Contains two super heroe ingredients wheatgrass and alfalfa. 1-1/4 teaspoon equals one serving of a dark green leafy vegetable.
    Kalyx: Wheat Grass Sprouting Seeds, Certified Organic, Starwest Botanicals, 1 lb: C
    Wheatgrass Sprouting Seed Cert. Organic (Agropyron elongatum; Tall Wheatgrass).
    Kalyx: Wheat Grass Powder (Triticum sativum; Wheatgrass; Fu Xiao Mai), Kalyx, 25 Kg (55 lbs): GF
    Kalyx: Wheat Grass Powder, Certified Organic (Triticum sativum; Wheatgrass; Fu Xiao Mai), Kalyx, 25 Kg (55 lbs): GF
    Kalyx: Wheat Sprout Powder, Certified Organic (Triticum sativum; Wheatgrass; Fu Xiao Mai), Kalyx, 25 Kg (55 lbs): GF
    Kalyx: Wheat Sprout Powder (Triticum sativum; Wheatgrass; Fu Xiao Mai), Kalyx, 25 Kg (55 lbs): GF


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Wheatgrass Grocery & Gourmet Food Products
    Amazon: Wheatgrass Herbal Supplement Products

  • Nutrition Basics: Wheatgrass Progreen Herbal Information






  • MoonDragon's Womens Health Index

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    Health & Wellness Index





    AROMATHERAPY: ESSENTIAL OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Allspice Leaf Oil
    Angelica Oil
    Anise Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Basil Oil
    Bay Laurel Oil
    Bay Oil
    Benzoin Oil
    Bergamot Oil
    Black Pepper Oil
    Chamomile (German) Oil
    Cajuput Oil
    Calamus Oil
    Camphor (White) Oil
    Caraway Oil
    Cardamom Oil
    Carrot Seed Oil
    Catnip Oil
    Cedarwood Oil
    Chamomile Oil
    Cinnamon Oil
    Citronella Oil
    Clary-Sage Oil
    Clove Oil
    Coriander Oil
    Cypress Oil
    Dill Oil
    Eucalyptus Oil
    Fennel Oil
    Fir Needle Oil
    Frankincense Oil
    Geranium Oil
    German Chamomile Oil
    Ginger Oil
    Grapefruit Oil
    Helichrysum Oil
    Hyssop Oil
    Iris-Root Oil
    Jasmine Oil
    Juniper Oil
    Labdanum Oil
    Lavender Oil
    Lemon-Balm Oil
    Lemongrass Oil
    Lemon Oil
    Lime Oil
    Longleaf-Pine Oil
    Mandarin Oil
    Marjoram Oil
    Mimosa Oil
    Myrrh Oil
    Myrtle Oil
    Neroli Oil
    Niaouli Oil
    Nutmeg Oil
    Orange Oil
    Oregano Oil
    Palmarosa Oil
    Patchouli Oil
    Peppermint Oil
    Peru-Balsam Oil
    Petitgrain Oil
    Pine-Long Leaf Oil
    Pine-Needle Oil
    Pine-Swiss Oil
    Rosemary Oil
    Rose Oil
    Rosewood Oil
    Sage Oil
    Sandalwood Oil
    Savory Oil
    Spearmint Oil
    Spikenard Oil
    Swiss-Pine Oil
    Tangerine Oil
    Tea-Tree Oil
    Thyme Oil
    Vanilla Oil
    Verbena Oil
    Vetiver Oil
    Violet Oil
    White-Camphor Oil
    Yarrow Oil
    Ylang-Ylang Oil
    Aromatherapy
    Healing Baths For Colds
    Aromatherapy
    Herbal Cleansers
    Using Essential Oils


    AROMATHERAPY: HERBAL & CARRIER OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Almond, Sweet Oil
    Apricot Kernel Oil
    Argan Oil
    Arnica Oil
    Avocado Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Black Cumin Oil
    Black Currant Oil
    Black Seed Oil
    Borage Seed Oil
    Calendula Oil
    Camelina Oil
    Castor Oil
    Coconut Oil
    Comfrey Oil
    Evening Primrose Oil
    Flaxseed Oil
    Grapeseed Oil
    Hazelnut Oil
    Hemp Seed Oil
    Jojoba Oil
    Kukui Nut Oil
    Macadamia Nut Oil
    Meadowfoam Seed Oil
    Mullein Oil
    Neem Oil
    Olive Oil
    Palm Oil
    Plantain Oil
    Plum Kernel Oil
    Poke Root Oil
    Pomegranate Seed Oil
    Pumpkin Seed Oil
    Rosehip Seed Oil
    Safflower Oil
    Sea Buckthorn Oil
    Sesame Seed Oil
    Shea Nut Oil
    Soybean Oil
    St. Johns Wort Oil
    Sunflower Oil
    Tamanu Oil
    Vitamin E Oil
    Wheat Germ Oil





    HELPFUL RELATED MOONDRAGON NUTRITION BASICS LINKS

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Amino Acids Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Antioxidants Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Enzymes Information
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Herbs Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Homeopathics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Hydrosols Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Minerals Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Mineral Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary & Cosmetic Supplements Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary Supplements Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Specialty Supplements
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Introduction


  • NUTRITION BASICS ARTICLES

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: 4 Basic Nutrients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Foods That Contain Additives & Artificial Ingredients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Is Aspartame A Safe Sugar Substitute?
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Guidelines For Selecting & Preparing Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Destroy
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Heal
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: The Micronutrients: Vitamins & Minerals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Overcooking Your Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Phytochemicals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Increase Your Consumption of Raw Produce
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Limit Your Use of Salt
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Use Proper Cooking Utensils
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Choosing The Best Water & Types of Water





  • RELATED MOONDRAGON HEALTH LINKS & INFORMATION

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Analysis Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Diet Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Recipe Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Therapy: Preparing Produce for Juicing
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Additives Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Safety Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Articles
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Back Pain
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Labor & Birth
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Blending Chart
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Essential Oil Details
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Miscarriage
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Post Partum
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Childbearing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Problems in Pregnancy & Birthing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #1
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #2
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Tips
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Uses
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Information Overview
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Touch & Movement Therapies Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy: Touch & Movement: Aromatherapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Therapy: Touch & Movement - Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Therapeutic Massage
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 1
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 2
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Hydrotherapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Pain Control Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Relaxation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Steam Inhalation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy - Herbal Oils Index







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    MOONDRAGON'S REALM - WEBSITE DIRECTORY


    A website map to help you find what you are looking for on MoonDragon.org's Website. Available pages have been listed under appropriate directory headings.




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