animated goddess mdbs banner animated goddess


MoonDragon's Health & Wellness
Nutrition Basics

Herbs
ELDER
Black Elder, Elderberry

(Sambucus Canadensis, Sambucus Nigra, Sambucus spp)


"For Informational Use Only"
For more detailed information contact your health care provider
about options that may be available for your specific situation.





  • Elder Herbal Description
  • Elder Uses, Health Benefits & Scientific Evidence
  • Elder Dosage Information
  • Elder Safety, Cautions & Interactions
  • Elder Supplements & Products




  • black elder


    ELDER HERBAL DESCRIPTION

    Black Elder is also known as Sambucus Nigra, Sambucus spp. Elder, Elderberry, Black Elderberry, Elder Flower, Bourtree or Bour Tree, European Elder, Pipe Tree, Tree of Music, Nigra for Berries, Canadensis for Flowers, American Elder, Common Elder, Black Elder, European Black Elder.

    The Black Elderberry is often used in an extract form. They also made a tea from Elderberry flowers for treating respiratory infections. They used the leaves and flowers in poultices and applied them to wounds; and used the bark as a laxative. The Elderberries were used to make beverages, pies, and preserves, but also they have been used to treat arthritis. Elderberry has diuretic, decongestant, laxative, anti-inflammatory properties.

    The Elder is a member of the honeysuckle family and can grow to a height of 33 feet. Elderberries (called Sambucus nigra) can be very different in form and taste and can grow from bushy shrubs from a few feet high to trees close to 50 feet in height. The elderberry tree has aromatic clusters of star-shaped white flowers that vary from flat-bottomed bunches to globular arrays. The sweet-smelling, spicy but somewhat bitter tasting flowers mature to produce blackish-purple berry-like full fruits with an aromatic, tart taste. The berry colors can range from blue, amber, and red to black and have very different tastes. The black elderberry is used in an extract form. The stalk and branches contain a white, fluffy pulp. Early Native American tribes used nature's way and took the aged hollow stems as arrows or bored holes in them to fashion flutes.

    The European Elder is a plant native to Europe, North Africa and western and central Asia. It thrives throughout lowland forests and along roads and fences and is very often found in farmhouse gardens. Its flowers and berries have a long history of use in traditional European medicine. Elderberries have been used for making preserves, wines, winter cordials, and for adding flavor and color to other wines.

    The flowers and ripe berries are the most common medicinally used parts of the tree. The flowers should be harvested as the plant begins to blossom. Dried fruits are less bitter than fresh. The stems and leaves are poisonous. The black elder flowers contains flavonoids, rutin, mucins and tannins and a large portion of organic acids and calcium. The berries contain fruit acids, vitamins B and C and folic acid, as well as essential oils. Potassium nitrate, sambucin, sambuigrin, sugars. The complex sugars of the berries are the immune-active fraction.

    ELDER HISTORY & FOLKLORE

    Much folklore is associated with this European plant that is also known as "bourtree." Pre-Christian documents attributed protective, healing powers to the black elder, and in England it is believed bad luck to cut its branches for fear of showing disrespect to the mother elder, who was thought to inhabit the tree.

    Shakespeare, in Cymbeline, referring to it as a symbol of grief, speaks slightingly of it as "the stinking Elder," yet, although many people profess a strong dislike to the scent of its blossom, the shrub is generally beloved by all who see it. In countrysides where the Elder flourishes it is certainly one of the most attractive features of the hedgerow, while its old-world associations have created for it a place in the hearts of English people.

    In Love's Labor Lost reference is made to the common medieval belief that "Judas was hanged on an Elder." We meet with this tradition as far back in English literature as Langland's Vision of Piers Plowman (middle of the fourteenth century, before Chaucer): "Judas he japed with Jewen silver And sithen an eller hanged hymselve." Why the Elder should have been selected as a gallows for the traitor Apostle is, considering the usual size of the tree, puzzling; but Sir John Mandeville in his travels, written about the same time, tells us that he was shown "faste by" the Pool of Siloam, the identical "Tree of Eldre that Judas henge himself upon, for despeyr that he hadde, when he solde and betrayed oure Lord." Gerard scouts the tradition and says that the Judas-tree (Cercis siliquastrum) is "the tree whereon Judas did hange himselfe."

    Another old tradition was that the Cross of Calvary was made of it, and an old couplet runs:
      "Bour tree - Bour tree: crooked rong Never straight and never strong;
      Ever bush and never tree
      Since our Lord was nailed on thee."

    In consequence of these old traditions, the Elder became the emblem of sorrow and death, and out of the legends which linger round the tree there grew up a host of superstitious fancies which still remain in the minds of simple country folk. Even in these prosaic days, one sometimes comes across a hedge-cutter who cannot bring himself to molest the rampant growth of its spreading branches for fear of being pursued by ill-luck. An old custom among gypsies forbade them using the wood to kindle their camp fires and gleaners of firewood formerly would look carefully through the faggots lest a stick of Elder should have found its way into the bundle, perhaps because the Holy Cross was believed to have been fashioned out of a giant elder tree, though probably the superstitious awe of harming the Elder descended from old heathen myths of northern Europe. In most countries, especially in Denmark, the Elder was intimately connected with magic. In its branches was supposed to dwell a dryad, Hylde-Moer, the Elder-tree Mother, who lived in the tree and watched over it. Should the tree be cut down and furniture be made of the wood, Hylde-Moer was believed to follow her property and haunt the owners. Lady Northcote, in The Book of Herbs, relates: "There is a tradition that once when a child was put in a cradle of Elder-wood, HyldeMoer came and pulled it by the legs and would give it no peace till it was lifted out Permission to cut Elder wood must always be asked first and not until Hylde-Moer has given consent by keeping silence, may the chopping begin."

    Arnkiel relates: "Our forefathers also held the Ellhorn holy wherefore whoever need to hew it down (or cut its branches) has first to make request Lady Ellhorn, give me some of thy wood and I will give thee some of mine when it grows in the forest - the which, with partly bended knees, bare head and folded arms was ordinarily done, as I myself have often seen and heard in my younger years."

    Mr. Jones (quoted in The Treasury of Botany), in his Notes on Certain Superstitions in the Vale of Gloucester, cites the following, said to be no unusual case: "Some men were employed in removing an old hedgerow, partially formed of Eldertrees. They had bound up all the other wood into faggots for burning, but had set apart the elder and enquired of their master how it was to be disposed of. Upon his saying that he should of course burn it with the rest, one of the men said with an air of undisguised alarm, that he had never heard of such a thing as burning Ellan Wood, and in fact, so strongly did he feel upon the subject, that he refused to participate in the act of tying it up. The word Ellan (still common with us) indicates the origin of the superstition."

    In earlier days, the Elder Tree was supposed to ward off evil influence and give protection from witches, a popular belief held in widely-distant countries. Lady Northcote says: "The Russians believe that Elder-trees drive away evil spirits, and the Bohemians go to it with a spell to take away fever. The Sicilians think that sticks of its wood will kill serpents and drive away robbers, and the Serbs introduce a stick of Elder into their wedding ceremonies to bring good luck. In England it was thought that the Elder was never struck by lightning, and a twig of it tied into three or four knots and carried in the pocket was a charm against rheumatism. A cross made of Elder and fastened to cowhouses and stables was supposed to keep all evil from the animals." In Cole's Art of Simpling (1656) we may read how in the later part of the seventeenth century: "in order to prevent witches from entering their houses, the common people used to gather Elder leaves on the last day of April and affix them to their doors and windows," and the tree was formerly much cultivated near English cottages for protection against witches. The use of the Elder for funeral purposes was an old English custom referred to by Spenser, "The Muses that were wont green Baies to weave, Now bringen bittre Eldre braunches seare." - Shepheard's Calendar - November. And Canon Ellacombe says that in the Tyrol: "An Elder bush, trimmed into the form of a cross, is planted on a new-made grave, and if it blossoms, the soul of the person Iying beneath it is happy."

    Green Elder branches were also buried in a grave to protect the dead from witches and evil spirits, and in some parts it was a custom for the driver of the hearse to carry a whip made of Elder wood. In some of the rural Midlands, it is believed that if a child is chastised with an Elder switch, it will cease to grow, owing, in this instance, to some supposed malign influence of the tree. On the other hand, Lord Bacon commended the rubbing of warts with a green Elder stick and then burying the stick to rot in the mud, and for erysipelas, it was recommended to wear about the neck an amulet made of Elder "on which the sun had never shined."

    In Denmark we come across the old belief that he who stood under an Elder tree on Midsummer Eve would see the King of Fairyland ride by, attended by all his retinue. Folkard, in Plant-Lore, Legends and Lyrics, relates: "The pith of the branches when cut in round, flat shapes, is dipped in oil, lighted, and then put to float in a glass of water; its light on Christmas Eve is thought to reveal to the owner all the witches and sorcerers in the neighborhood"; and again, "On Bertha Night (6th January), the devil goes about with special virulence. As a safeguard, persons are recommended to make a magic circle, in the center of which they should stand, with Elderberries gathered on St. John's night. By doing this, the mystic Fern-seed may be obtained, which possesses the strength of thirty or forty men."

    This is a Styrian tradition.

    The whole tree has a narcotic smell, and it is not considered wise to sleep under its shade. Perhaps the visions of fairyland were the result of the drugged sleep! No plant will grow under the shadow of it, being affected by its exhalations.

    Apart from all these traditions, the Elder has had from the earliest days a firm claim on the popular affection for its many sterling virtues.





    elder tree


    ELDER USES, HEALTH BENEFITS & SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE

    MEDICINAL USES

    Some clinicians think that Elderberries are more effective at shortening colds and flu than Echinacea. Preliminary studies with a certain strain of epidemic flu have shown that Elderberry extract reduced recovery time by half. It also helps bring up phlegm associated with asthma, bronchitis, colds, flu and smoking. A hot infusion works well for treating respiratory infections, tonsillitis, and laryngitis. At the onset of a cold, fever, measles, rash or chickenpox, an infusion will stimulate circulation and cause sweating, cleansing the system of toxins. Externally, Elderberry flowers can soothe cuts and wounds, chilblains, skin eruptions, sunburn, and irritable skin. In traditional European medicine, the juice of this plant is used for treating sciatica and neuralgia. It is now being studied for its effectiveness against other viral infections, including HIV and herpes.

    HEALTH BENEFITS

    Elderberry has diuretic, decongestant, laxative, and anti-inflammatory properties. Described as a "complete medicine chest," black elder induces perspiration. When you have a feverish cold, take it in the form of a hot drink. Elder also promotes expectoration, which makes it a good treatment for coughing and bronchitis. The pulp of the berry and the freshly made juice have a diuretic and laxative effect on the body. Avoid the red berry species of elder, as it can irritate the digestive system and make you feel nauseous.

    Native Americans used the flowers, berries, and bark of elderberry trees to treat fevers and arthritic joint pain for hundreds of years and made a tea from elderberry flowers for treating respiratory infections. They used the leaves and flowers in poultices and applied them to wounds; and used the bark as a laxative. , but elderberry's real claim to fame is as a cure for the flu, Israeli researchers have developed five formulas based on elderberry fruit that have been clinically proven to prevent and ameliorate all kinds of influenza.

    Some clinicians think that Elderberries are more effective at shortening colds and flu than Echinacea. Preliminary studies with a certain strain of epidemic flu have shown that Elderberry extract reduced recovery time by half. It also helps bring up phlegm associated with asthma, bronchitis, colds, flu and smoking. A hot infusion works well for treating respiratory infections, tonsillitis, and laryngitis. At the onset of a cold, fever, measles, rash or chickenpox, an infusion will stimulate circulation and cause sweating, cleansing the system of toxins. Externally, Elderberry flowers can soothe cuts and wounds, chilblains, skin eruptions, sunburn, and irritable skin. In traditional European medicine, the juice of this plant is used for treating sciatica and neuralgia. It is now being studied for its effectiveness against other viral infections, including HIV and herpes.

    Extensive research show that elder stop the production of hormone-like cytokines that direct a class of white blood cells known as neutrophils to cause inflammation, especially in influenza and arthritis. On the other hand, elder increases the production non-inflammatory infection-fighting cytokines as much as 10 fold. Elder berries are known to be effective against eight strains of influenza. This suggests that elder be superior to vaccines in preventing flu, because flu vaccines are only effective against known strains of flu, whereas the virus is continually mutating to new strains. Vaccines have another draw back: over half of people who get them report side effects. Dr. Madeleine Mumcuoglu, of Hadassah-Hebrew University in Israel found that elderberry disarms the enzyme viruses use to penetrate healthy cells in the lining of the nose and throat. Taken before infection, it prevents infection. Taken after infection, it prevents spread of the virus through the respiratory tract. In a clinical trial, 20 percent of study subjects reported significant improvement within 24 hours, 70 percent by 48 hours, and 90 percent claimed complete cure in three days. In contrast, subjects receiving the placebo required 6 days to recover.

    A folk remedy for burns is a paste made of elder and milk. Boil freshly picked, chopped flowers in enough milk to make a thick paste. Allow to cool and apply to the affected part of the skin.

    The elderberries were used to make beverages, pies, and preserves. Typical preparations include teas, tinctures, encapsulations, syrups, wine, cordials, and even ketchup, often combined with propolis or echinacea.





    black elder flowers


    ELDER DOSAGE INFORMATION

    Elderberry comes in various forms and is an ingredient in numerous products.

    Elder constituents include potassium nitrate, sambucin, sambunigrin, sugars. The complex sugars of the berries are the immune-active fraction. Plant parts used are most commonly the flowers or berries. Dried fruits are less bitter than fresh. The branches and leaves are poisonous. The small stem which is sometimes left on the berry is safe. Typical preparations include teas, tinctures, encapsulations, syrups, wine, cordials, and even ketchup, often combined with Propolis or Echinacea.

    DOSAGE RECOMMENDATIONS

    For use, steep 3 to 5 grams of dried Elder flowers in 1 cup of boiling water for ten minutes. Drink 1 cup 3 times daily.

    Elder works best when combined with Yarrow or Peppermint for treating colds, catarrh, sinusitis, hay fever and bronchial congestion, To take other formulations, read product label directions for use.


    METHODS OF ADMINISTRATION

    Tea, Flowers

    Pour 1 cup of boiling water over 2 heaping teaspoons of dried elder flowers. Steep this mixture for 10 minutes, then strain. Drink 1 to 2 cups of freshly prepared tea several times daily. For best results, drink the tea as hot as you can tolerate it.

    Tea, Berries

    Add enough cold water to cover approximately 3 heaping teaspoons of dried elderberries and allow to stand for several minutes. Then slowly bring the water-berry mixture to a simmer. Gently simmer for 10 minutes and then strain and drink.

    Juice, Syrup

    Remove the stems from 4 pounds of ripe berries. Squeeze the juice from the berries into a saucepan and add about 1 pound of sugar. Boil for 5 minutes. Skim the foam from the surface, fill canning jars with the syrup and seal while hot. Prepared syrup is available from pharmacies and health food stores if you do not want to make your own. To prevent or to treat a cold, drink the heated juice or syrup dissolved in hot water.

    Puree, Berries

    Boil about 1 pound of ripe elderberries with 1 cup of water and 2 diced apples. Put through a sieve and sweeten to taste.





    ELDER SAFETY, CAUTIONS & INTERACTIONS INFORMATION

    SAFETY CONCERNS

    There are no precautions for flowers or berries, however excessive use may cause nausea and vomiting in some individuals. According to the Botanical Safety Handbook, the unripe and raw fruit, seeds, bark and leaves contain a component, sambunigrin, which may cause vomiting or severe diarrhea if ingested.

    Side effects are rare with Elder and consist of the mild gastrointestinal distress and allergic reactions; however, safety in young children, pregnant or nursing women, or those with severe liver or kidney disease is not known.

    Michael McGuffin, ed., American Herbal Products Associationís Botanical Safety Handbook, (New York: CRC Press, 1997)





    ELDER & ELDERBERRY HERBAL & RELATED PRODUCTS

  • Elder & Elderberry (Black) Herbal Products


  • QUALITY SUPPLIES & PRODUCTS


    FTC Advertising & Affilate Disclosure: This website has an affiliate relationship with certain merchants selling products and we recieve commissions from those sales to help support this website. Any products listed here are not listed by any rating system. We do not rate any product or post any feedback about products listed here. We leave this to the individual merchants to provide. We do not provide product prices or shopping carts since you do not order these products directly from us, but from the merchant providing the products. We only provide the link to that merchant webpage with all related product information and pricing. The products are listed here by merchant, product use, quantity size or volume, and for nutritional supplements - dosage per unit. All product descriptions are provided by the merchant or manufacturer and are not our descriptive review of the product. We do not endorse any specific product or attest to its effectiveness to treat any health condition or support nutritional requirements for any individual.

    black elder berries



    ELDER & ELDERBERRY (BLACK) HERBAL PRODUCTS

    Elderberry is the berry of the black elder tree (Sambucus nigra). Its constituents may strengthen the bodys immune system. Elderberries contain bioflavonoids and anthocyanins, which positively influence cell function. A tea from Elderberry flowers for treating respiratory infections. The leaves and flowers are in poultices and applied them to wounds; and used the bark as a laxative.

    MOUNTAIN ROSE HERBS PRODUCTS

    Mountain Rose Herbs: Elder Berries, Certified Organic, Bulk Organic Herb & Spices
    Mountain Rose Herbs: Elder Berry Powder, Certified Organic, Bulk Organic Herb & Spices
    Mountain Rose Herbs: Elder Flowers, Certified Organic, Bulk Organic Herbs & Spices
    Mountain Rose Herbs: Elder Berry Herbal Extract, Certified Organic, Single Herbal Extracts & Tinctures
    Mountain Rose Herbs: Clear Chest Syrup, Urban Moonshine, 4.2 fl. oz. With Measuring Cup
    Urban Moonshine's Clear Chest Syrup is an expectorant formula blended to be fast-acting and supportive of long-term health. Containing herbal actives including certified organic elecampane, thyme, licorice, elder flower, and lobelia, all in a base of raw honey and lemon to promote absorption.
    Mountain Rose Herbs: Flashes Tea, Certified Organic, Herbal Tea Blends
    This cooling and slightly astringent infusion blend is helpful in soothing those hot "power surges" often associated with menopause. This herbally tasty tea is also useful for anyone feeling hot or overwhelmed. Brew up a pot and sip as needed, or refrigerate to enhance the cooling effect. Contains: organic Motherwort herb, organic Sage, organic Dandelion leaf, organic Chickweed, organic Elder flowers, organic Violet leaf, and organic Oatstraw.
    Mountain Rose Herbs: Vanilla & Elder Flower Facial Wash, Fawn Lily Botanica, 8.3 oz Bottle with Foamin Pump Top
    This artisan foaming facial wash is handcrafted in the Pacific Northwest. An aromatic and gentle blend formulated for normal to dry or mature skin. A mild and soothing wash with an exotic and sweet aroma.


    STARWEST BOTANICALS PRODUCTS

    Starwest Botanicals: Elder Flowers, Cut & Sifted, Wildcrafted, 1 lb.
    Starwest Botanicals: Elder Flowers, Cut & Sifted, Organic, 1 lb.
    Starwest Botanicals: Elder Berries, Whole, Wildcrafted, 1 lb.
    Starwest Botanicals: Elder Berries, Whole, Organic, 1 lb.
    Starwest Botanicals: Elder Berry Extract, Organic, 1 fl. oz.
    Starwest Botanicals: Elder Berry Extract, Organic, 4 fl. oz.


    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbsPro: Elderberry Fruit Extract, Standardized, BlueBonnet Nutrition, 150 mg, 60 VCaps (100895)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Berry Extract, Standardized, Solgar, 150 mg, 60 VCaps (36380)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Flower (Sambucus Canadensis Flower), Eclectic Institute, 300 mg, 90 Caps (1082)
    HerbsPro: Black Elderberry, Gaia Herbs, 400 mg, 30 Caps (82212)
    HerbsPro: Black Elderberry, Gaia Herbs, 400 mg, 60 Caps (82213)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Extract, Quantum Research, 400 mg, 60 Caps (18545)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry, Natures Way, 460 mg, 100 Caps (17853)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Extract, Source Naturals Wellness, 500 mg, 30 Tabs (3825)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Extract, Now Foods, 500 mg, 60 VCaps (68130)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Extract, Source Naturals Wellness, 500 mg, 120 Tabs (3827)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Full Spectrum Extract, Planetary Herbals, 525 mg, 42 Tabs (3265)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Full Spectrum Extract, Planetary Herbals, 525 mg, 90 Tabs (3370)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Full Spectrum Extract, Planetary Herbals, 525 mg, 180 Tabs (6564)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Zinc Herbal Lozenges, Zand, 12 Pack (89765)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry & Zinc, Now Foods, 30 Lozenges (68131)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry & Zinc, Now Foods, 90 Lozenges (68132)
    HerbsPro: NNI Elderberry, Nutrition Now, 60 Chews (93667)
    HerbsPro: Elder Flower Tea, Organic, Alvita Teas, 24 Tea Bags (108599)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Extract, Alcohol Free, Eclectic Institute Inc, 1 fl. oz. (31931)
    HerbsPro: Black Elderberry Extract, Gaia Herbs, Organic, 1 fl. oz. (90883)
    HerbsPro: Black Elderberry Extract (Sambucus nigra), Herb Pharm, 1 fl. oz. (77564)
    HerbsPro: Black Elderberry Glycerite Extract (Sambucus nigra), Herb Pharm, 1 fl. oz. (31297)
    HerbsPro: Black Elderberry Extract, Gaia Herbs, Organic, 2 fl. oz. (90884)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Extract, Alcohol Free, Eclectic Institute Inc, 2 fl. oz. (76207)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Fluid Extract, Full Spectrum, Planetary Herbals, 2 fl. oz. (6565)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Liquid Extract, Source Naturals Wellness, 2 fl. oz. (3043)
    HerbsPro: Elderol, Wild Raw Purple Elderberry Extract, North American Herb & Spice, 2 fl. oz. (93655)
    The powers of elderberry are legendary. Elderol is a cold-pressed extract of wild, raw purple elderberry. This extract is a true whole food. All the components of the elderberry, even the seed, are extracted. Get your elderberry raw, without alcohol extraction of the use of any other harsh chemicals. Since Elderol is raw, it is rich in natural enzymes, plus the pigments are unaltered, as are the naturally occurring vitamins. Take this under the tongue; it is potent. Combined with wild, raw arona berry extract to increase potency.
    HerbsPro: Black Elderberry Extract, Gaia Herbs, Organic, 4 fl. oz. (90885)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Fluid Extract, Full Spectrum, Planetary Herbals, 4 fl. oz. (6566)
    HerbsPro: Black Elderberry Extract (Sambucus nigra), Herb Pharm, 4 fl. oz. (77565)
    HerbsPro: Black Elderberry Glycerite Extract (Sambucus nigra), Herb Pharm, 4 fl. oz. (32304)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Liquid Extract, Source Naturals Wellness, 4 fl. oz. (3044)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Alcohol Free Extract, Natures Answer, 4 fl. oz. (17169)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Fluid Extract, Full Spectrum, Planetary Herbals, 8 fl. oz. (6567)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Extract, Honey Gardens Apiaries, 8 fl. oz. (51083)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Liquid Extract, Source Naturals Wellness, 8 fl. oz. (3045)
    HerbsPro: Black Elderberry Extract, Gaia Herbs, Organic, 8 fl. oz. (90886)
    HerbsPro: Black Elderberry Extract, Gaia Herbs, Organic, 16 fl. oz. (90887)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Liquid Concentrate, Now Foods, 8 fl. oz. (84919)
    Elderberry (Sambucus nigra) is a multipurpose fruit used widely throughout Europe. As a centuries old tradition, it has been used by herbalists as a tonic to maintain health and well-being. More recently, Elderberry has been recognized for its high nutritive value. Elderberry provides vitamins A and C, as well as anthocyanins, which are potent free radical scavengers. It is truly among nature's sweet and healthy surprises. Healthy immune support in a 10:1 concentrate, 500 mg per teaspoon.
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Liquid Extract, 100% Pure Juice Concentrate, Dynamic Health, 8 oz. (42575)
    Natural Black Elderberry 100% Juice Concentrate is a Non-Alcoholic source for the health benefits of Elderberries. A medically proven strong anti-viral and immune system enhancer, elderberry is recommended as part of a health maintenance program.
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Concentrate, Natural Sources, 8 fl. oz. (50091)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Concentrate, Natural Sources, 16 fl. oz. (50092)
    Elderberry (Sambucus nigra) has immune enhancing; laxative; and diuretic properties and may be helpful for flu; colds; rheumatism; syphilis; constipation; fluid retention; colic; diarrhea; colds; coughs; bronchitis; nerve disorders; back pain; urinary tract inflammation; asthma; and fever. Natural Elderberry Concentrate - Use full strength and mix 8 ounces of concentrate to 56 ounces water or juice to make a healthy delicious drink (makes 1/2 gallon). Approximately 8.5 pounds of fresh whole fruit is pressed and concentrated to get one pint of Natural Fruit Concentrate.
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Syrup, Planetary Herbals, 2 fl. oz. (3333)
    HerbsPro: Echinacea-Elderberry Syrup, Planetary Herbals, 2 fl. oz. (1398)
    HerbsPro: Black Elderberry Syrup, Gaia Herbs, 3 fl. oz. (94161)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Syrup, Planetary Herbals, 4 fl. oz. (3266)
    HerbsPro: Echinacea-Elderberry Syrup, Planetary Herbals, 4 fl. oz. (1410)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Zinc & Echinacea Syrup, Now Foods, 4 fl. oz. (68134)
    HerbsPro: Black Elderberry Syrup, Gaia Herbs, 5.4 fl. oz. (82227)
    HerbsPro: Black Elderberry NightTime Syrup, Gaia Herbs, 5.4 fl. oz. (82229)
    HerbsPro: Elderberry Syrup, Planetary Herbals, 8 fl. oz. (20686)
    HerbsPro: Echinacea-Elderberry Syrup, Planetary Herbals, 8 fl. oz. (2035)


    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Elder Flowers, Cut & Sifted, Certified Organic, Starwest Botanicals, 4 oz.
    Kalyx: Elder Flowers, Rubbed, Certified Organic, Starwest Botanicals, 1 lb.
    Kalyx: Elder Flowers, Whole, Frontier Natural Brand Bulk Herbs, 1 lb.


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Elderberry Whole Herb Products
    Amazon: Elderberry Powder Herb Products
    Amazon: Elderberry Syrup Herb Products
    Amazon: Elderberry Extract Herb Products
    Amazon: Elder Flowers Herb Products
    Amazon: Elder Tea Herb Products
    Amazon: Sambucus Black Elderberry Herb Products


  • Nutrition Basics: Elder / Black Elderberry / Sambucus Herbal Information






  • MoonDragon's Womens Health Index

    | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |






    Health & Wellness Index





    AROMATHERAPY: ESSENTIAL OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Allspice Leaf Oil
    Angelica Oil
    Anise Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Basil Oil
    Bay Laurel Oil
    Bay Oil
    Benzoin Oil
    Bergamot Oil
    Black Pepper Oil
    Chamomile (German) Oil
    Cajuput Oil
    Calamus Oil
    Camphor (White) Oil
    Caraway Oil
    Cardamom Oil
    Carrot Seed Oil
    Catnip Oil
    Cedarwood Oil
    Chamomile Oil
    Cinnamon Oil
    Citronella Oil
    Clary-Sage Oil
    Clove Oil
    Coriander Oil
    Cypress Oil
    Dill Oil
    Eucalyptus Oil
    Fennel Oil
    Fir Needle Oil
    Frankincense Oil
    Geranium Oil
    German Chamomile Oil
    Ginger Oil
    Grapefruit Oil
    Helichrysum Oil
    Hyssop Oil
    Iris-Root Oil
    Jasmine Oil
    Juniper Oil
    Labdanum Oil
    Lavender Oil
    Lemon-Balm Oil
    Lemongrass Oil
    Lemon Oil
    Lime Oil
    Longleaf-Pine Oil
    Mandarin Oil
    Marjoram Oil
    Mimosa Oil
    Myrrh Oil
    Myrtle Oil
    Neroli Oil
    Niaouli Oil
    Nutmeg Oil
    Orange Oil
    Oregano Oil
    Palmarosa Oil
    Patchouli Oil
    Peppermint Oil
    Peru-Balsam Oil
    Petitgrain Oil
    Pine-Long Leaf Oil
    Pine-Needle Oil
    Pine-Swiss Oil
    Rosemary Oil
    Rose Oil
    Rosewood Oil
    Sage Oil
    Sandalwood Oil
    Savory Oil
    Spearmint Oil
    Spikenard Oil
    Swiss-Pine Oil
    Tangerine Oil
    Tea-Tree Oil
    Thyme Oil
    Vanilla Oil
    Verbena Oil
    Vetiver Oil
    Violet Oil
    White-Camphor Oil
    Yarrow Oil
    Ylang-Ylang Oil
    Aromatherapy
    Healing Baths For Colds
    Aromatherapy
    Herbal Cleansers
    Using Essential Oils


    AROMATHERAPY: HERBAL & CARRIER OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Almond, Sweet Oil
    Apricot Kernel Oil
    Argan Oil
    Arnica Oil
    Avocado Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Black Cumin Oil
    Black Currant Oil
    Black Seed Oil
    Borage Seed Oil
    Calendula Oil
    Camelina Oil
    Castor Oil
    Coconut Oil
    Comfrey Oil
    Evening Primrose Oil
    Flaxseed Oil
    Grapeseed Oil
    Hazelnut Oil
    Hemp Seed Oil
    Jojoba Oil
    Kukui Nut Oil
    Macadamia Nut Oil
    Meadowfoam Seed Oil
    Mullein Oil
    Neem Oil
    Olive Oil
    Palm Oil
    Plantain Oil
    Plum Kernel Oil
    Poke Root Oil
    Pomegranate Seed Oil
    Pumpkin Seed Oil
    Rosehip Seed Oil
    Safflower Oil
    Sea Buckthorn Oil
    Sesame Seed Oil
    Shea Nut Oil
    Soybean Oil
    St. Johns Wort Oil
    Sunflower Oil
    Tamanu Oil
    Vitamin E Oil
    Wheat Germ Oil





    HELPFUL RELATED MOONDRAGON NUTRITION BASICS LINKS

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Amino Acids Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Antioxidants Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Enzymes Information
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Herbs Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Homeopathics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Hydrosols Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Minerals Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Mineral Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary & Cosmetic Supplements Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary Supplements Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Specialty Supplements
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Introduction


  • NUTRITION BASICS ARTICLES

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: 4 Basic Nutrients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Foods That Contain Additives & Artificial Ingredients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Is Aspartame A Safe Sugar Substitute?
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Guidelines For Selecting & Preparing Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Destroy
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Heal
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: The Micronutrients: Vitamins & Minerals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Overcooking Your Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Phytochemicals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Increase Your Consumption of Raw Produce
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Limit Your Use of Salt
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Use Proper Cooking Utensils
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Choosing The Best Water & Types of Water





  • RELATED MOONDRAGON HEALTH LINKS & INFORMATION

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Analysis Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Diet Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Recipe Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Therapy: Preparing Produce for Juicing
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Additives Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Safety Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Articles
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Back Pain
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Labor & Birth
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Blending Chart
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Essential Oil Details
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Miscarriage
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Post Partum
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Childbearing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Problems in Pregnancy & Birthing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #1
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #2
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Tips
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Uses
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Information Overview
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Touch & Movement Therapies Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy: Touch & Movement: Aromatherapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Therapy: Touch & Movement - Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Therapeutic Massage
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 1
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 2
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Hydrotherapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Pain Control Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Relaxation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Steam Inhalation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy - Herbal Oils Index







  • For a full list of available products from Mountain Rose Herbs, click on banner below:






    Starwest Botanicals




    HerbsPro Supplement Store


    HerbsPro




    Up to 70% Off Bath & Beauty - evitamins


    eVitamins








    Kalyx.com Herbs, Foods, Supplements, Bath & Body


    Chinese Herbs Direct


    Ayurvedic Herbs Direct


    Pet Herbs Direct


    TakeHerb.com


    Wild Divine - Stress relief training software and meditation.


    Aleva Health - Hosiery, Orthopedics, Wound Care, Support, Diabetic Socks


    ShareASale Merchant-Affiliate Program








    MOONDRAGON'S REALM - WEBSITE DIRECTORY


    A website map to help you find what you are looking for on MoonDragon.org's Website. Available pages have been listed under appropriate directory headings.




    Top