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MoonDragon's Health & Wellness
Nutrition Basics

Herbs
BLACK TEA

(Camellia Sinensis)


For Informational Use Only
For more detailed information contact your health care provider
about options that may be available for your specific situation.





  • Black Tea Herbal Description
  • Black Tea Uses, Health Benefits & Scientific Evidence
  • Black Tea Dosage Information
  • Black Tea Safety, Cautions & Interactions
  • Black Tea Herbal Supplements & Products




  • black tea


    BLACK TEA HERBAL DESCRIPTION

    Camellia sinensis is the species of plant whose leaves and leaf buds are used to produce the popular beverage tea. Black tea is a classic around the world and a universal beverage that speaks many languages. Our merchants have an extensive selection of high quality organic black teas are rich with penetrating flavors and contain caffeine. See Black Tea Products for a list of fine choices.

    Black Tea is a product made from the Camellia sinensis plant. The aged leaves and stems are used to make medicine. Green Tea, which is made from fresh leaves of the same plant, has some different properties. White tea, yellow tea, green tea, oolong, pu-erh tea and black tea are all harvested from this species, but are processed differently to attain different levels of oxidation. Kukicha (twig tea) is also harvested from Camellia sinensis, but uses twigs and stems rather than leaves. Common names include tea plant, tea shrub, and tea tree (not to be confused with Melaleuca alternifolia, the source of Tea Tree Oil.

    camellia sinensis tea plants


    There are two major varieties used for tea: Chinese tea, Camellia sinensis var. sinensis and Assam tea, Camellia sinensis var. assamica.

    Black Leaf Tea is also known as Camellia sinensis, Camellia thea, Camellia theifera, Chinese Tea, English Tea, Feuille de The Noir, Te Negro, Tea, The Anglais, The Noir, Thea bohea, Thea sinensis, Thea viridis, Theaflavin, and Theaflavine.

    Camellia sinensis is native to East, South and Southeast Asia, but it is today cultivated across the world in tropical and subtropical regions. Camellia Senensis is an evergreen shrub or small tree that is usually trimmed to below 6.6-feet when cultivated for its leaves. It has a strong tap-root. The flowers are yellow-white, 0.98 to 1.57-inches in diameter, with 7 to 8 petals. The seeds of Camellia sinensis and Camellia oleifera can be pressed to yield tea oil, a sweetish seasoning and cooking oil that should not be confused with tea tree oil, an essential oil that is used for medical and cosmetic purposes, and originates from the leaves of a different plant.

    The leaves are 1.6 to 5.9-inches long and 0.79 to 1.97-inches broad. Fresh leaves contain about 4-percent caffeine. The young, light green leaves are preferably harvested for tea production; they have short white hairs on the underside. Older leaves are deeper green. Different leaf ages produce differing tea qualities, since their chemical compositions are different. Usually, the tip (bud) and the first two to three leaves are harvested for processing. This hand picking is repeated every one to two weeks.

    camillia sinensis tea leaves and flowers


    CAMELLIA SINENSIS HEALTH EFFECTS

    The leaves have been used in traditional Chinese medicine and other medical systems to treat asthma (functioning as a bronchodilator), angina pectoris, peripheral vascular disease, and coronary artery disease. Recent medical research on tea (most of which has been on green tea) has revealed various health benefits, including anti-cancer potential, effects on cholesterol levels, antibacterial properties and positive effects for weight loss. It is considered to have many positive health benefits due to tea's high levels of catechins, a type of antioxidant. Among other interesting bioactivities, (-)-catechin from C. sinensis was shown to act as agonist of PPARgamma, nuclear receptor that is current pharmacological target for the treatment of diabetes type 2. However, tea may have some negative impacts on health, such as over-consumption of caffeine, and the presence of fluoride and oxalates in tea.





    black tea brewed drink


    BLACK TEA USES, HEALTH BENEFITS & SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE

    HEALTH BENEFITS OF BLACK TEA

    Black tea is used for improving mental alertness as well as learning, memory and information processing skills. It is also used for treating headache and low blood pressure; preventing heart disease, including "hardening of the arteries" (atherosclerosis) and heart attack; preventing Parkinson's disease; and reducing the risk of stomach and colon cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, and breast cancer. It is also used for type 2 diabetes, stomach disorders, vomiting, diarrhea, and as a diuretic to increase urine flow. Some people use black tea for preventing tooth decay and kidney stones. In combination with various other products, black tea is used for weight loss.

    In foods, black tea is consumed as a hot or cold beverage. Black tea contains 2 to 4-percent caffeine, which affects thinking and alertness, increases urine output, and may reduce the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. It also contains antioxidants and other substances that might help protect the heart and blood vessels.

    NATURAL MEDICINES COMPREHENSIVE DATABASE (NIH)

    This database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.

    The effectiveness ratings for BLACK TEA are as follows:

    Likely Effective For: Mental alertness. Drinking black tea and other caffeinated beverages throughout the day helps to keep people alert, even after extended periods without sleep.

    Possibly Effective For:

  • Preventing dizziness upon standing up (orthostatic hypotension) in older people. Black tea works for this condition because it raises blood pressure.
  • Reducing the risk of heart attacks. There is some evidence that people who drink black tea have a lower risk of heart attack. If they do have a heart attack, they are less likely to die if they have been drinking black tea for at least a year.
  • Reducing the risk of kidney stones. Women who drink black tea seem to have an 8-percent lower risk of developing kidney stones.
  • Reducing the risk of Parkinson's disease. There is some evidence from large-scale studies that people who drink caffeinated beverages such as coffee, tea, and cola have a decreased risk of Parkinson's disease. For men, the effects seem to be dose-related. For example, men consuming a total of 421 to 2716 mg of caffeine daily seem to have the greatest reduction in risk. However, there seems to be a significant reduction in risk even with consumption of as little as 124 to 208 mg caffeine per day. In women, the effects do not seem to be dose-related. Moderate consumption of caffeine (about one to four cups black tea daily) seems to provide the most reduction in risk. Drinking black tea also appears to reduce the occurrence of Parkinson's disease among people who smoke.
  • Reducing the risk of ovarian cancer. Women who regularly drink tea, including black tea or green tea, appear to have a significantly lower risk of developing ovarian cancer compared to women who never or seldom drink tea.
  • Reducing the risk of hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), especially in women.

  • Possibly Ineffective For:

  • Reducing the risk of stomach, colon, and rectal cancer.
  • Reducing the risk of breast cancer.

  • Insufficient Evidence To Rate Effectiveness For:

  • Brittle bones (osteoporosis). So far there is some evidence that drinking black tea might be linked to stronger bones in women aged 65 to 76 years. Drinking black tea also seems to be associated with a lower risk of hip fracture in men and women who are older than 50.
  • Type 2 diabetes. Some research suggests that Japanese adults who drink a cup or more of black tea daily do not have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to those who drink less than a cup daily.
  • Lung cancer. There is evidence that men who get more chemicals called phytoestrogens in their diet have up to a 27-percent lower risk of developing lung cancer than men who do not get these chemicals. Green tea and black tea contain phytoestrogens.
  • Stomach disorders.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Vomiting.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Preventing tooth decay.
  • Headache.
  • Reducing the risk of other cancers.
  • Promoting weight loss.
  • Other conditions. More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of black tea for these uses.


  • REFERENCES

    1.Parker DL, Hoffmann TK, Tucker MA, et al. Interaction between warfarin and black tea. Ann Pharmacother 2009;43:150-1.
    2.Savitz DA, Chan RL, Herring AH, et al. Caffeine and miscarriage risk. Epidemiology 2008;19:55-62.
    3.Weng X, Odouli R, Li DK. Maternal caffeine consumption during pregnancy and the risk of miscarriage: a prospective cohort study. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2008;198:279.e1-8.
    4.Fukuda I, Sakane I, Yabushita Y, et al. Black tea theaflavins suppress dioxin-induced transformation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2005;69:883-90.
    5.Kundu T, Dey S, Roy M, et al. Induction of apoptosis in human leukemia cells by black tea and its polyphenol theaflavin. Cancer Lett 2005;230:111-21.
    6.Way TD, Lee HH, Kao MC, Lin JK. Black tea polyphenol theaflavins inhibit aromatase activity and attenuate tamoxifen resistance in HER2/neu-transfected human breast cancer cells through tyrosine kinase suppression. Eur J Cancer 2004;40:2165-74.
    7.Mizuno H, Cho YY, Zhu F, et al. Theaflavin-3, 3'-digallate induces epidermal growth factor receptor downregulation. Mol Carcinog 2006;45:204-12.
    8.Chen CN, Lin CP, Huang KK, et al. Inhibition of SARS-CoV 3C-like Protease Activity by Theaflavin-3,3'-digallate (TF3). Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2005;2:209-15.
    9.Liu S, Lu H, Zhao Q, et al. Theaflavin derivatives in black tea and catechin derivatives in green tea inhibit HIV-1 entry by targeting gp41. Biochim Biophys Acta 2005;1723:270-81.
    10.Tu YY, Tang AB, Watanabe N. The theaflavin monomers inhibit the cancer cells growth in vitro. Acta Biochim Biophys Sin (Shanghai) 2004;36:508-12.
    To see all references for the Black Information: NIH Drug Information.





    BLACK TEA DOSAGE INFORMATION

    An 8-ounce serving of black tea provides from 40 to 120 mg of caffeine, the active ingredient. The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

    BY MOUTH

  • For headache or improving mental alertness: a typical dose is up to 250 mg of caffeine (several cups of black tea) per day.
  • For reducing the risk of heart attack and kidney stones: a dose of at least one cup per day.
  • For preventing "hardening of the arteries" (atherosclerosis), 125 to 500 mL (1 to 4 cups) of brewed black tea daily.
  • For preventing Parkinson's Disease: Men drinking 421 to 2716 mg of total caffeine (approximately 5 to 33 cups of black tea) daily have the lowest risk of developing Parkinson's disease, when compared to other men. However, men who drink as little as 124 to 208 mg of caffeine (approximately 1 to 3 cups of black tea) daily also have a significantly lower chance of developing Parkinson's disease. In women, moderate caffeine intake (1 to 4 cups of black tea) per day seems to be best.




    BLACK TEA SAFETY, CAUTIONS & INTERACTIONS INFORMATION

    Black tea is safe for most adults. Too much black tea, such as more than five cups per day, can cause side effects because of the caffeine. These side effects can range from mild to serious and include headache, nervousness, sleep problems, vomiting, diarrhea, irritability, irregular heartbeat, tremor, heartburn, dizziness, ringing in the ears, convulsions, and confusion. People who drink black tea or other caffeinated beverages all the time, especially in large amounts, can develop psychological dependence. Caffeine is considered probably safe in children in amounts commonly found in foods.

    SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS & WARNINGS

  • Pregnancy & Breast-feeding: If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, black tea in small amounts is probably not harmful. Do not drink more than 2 cups a day of black tea. This amount of tea provides about 200 mg of caffeine. Consuming more than this amount during pregnancy has been linked to an increased risk of miscarriage and other negative effects, including symptoms of caffeine withdrawal in newborns and lower birth weight. If you are breast-feeding, drinking more than 2 cups a day of black tea might cause your baby to become more irritable and have more bowel movements.
  • Anemia: Drinking black tea may make anemia worse in people with iron deficiency.
  • Anxiety Disorders: The caffeine in black tea might make these conditions worse.
  • Bleeding Disorders: There is some reason to believe that the caffeine in black tea might slow blood clotting, though this hasnít been shown in people. Use caffeine cautiously if you have a bleeding disorder.
  • Heart Problems: Caffeine in black tea can cause irregular heartbeat in certain people. If you have a heart condition, use caffeine with caution.
  • Diabetes: The caffeine in black tea might affect blood sugar. Use black tea with caution if you have diabetes.
  • Diarrhea: Black tea contains caffeine. The caffeine in black tea, especially when taken in large amounts, can worsen diarrhea.
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS): Black tea contains caffeine. The caffeine in black tea, especially when taken in large amounts, can worsen diarrhea and might worsen symptoms of IBS.
  • Glaucoma: Drinking caffeinated black tea increases the pressure inside the eye. The increase occurs within 30 minutes and lasts for at least 90 minutes.
  • Hormone-Sensitive Condition: Such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, or uterine fibroids: Black tea might act like estrogen. If you have any condition that might be made worse by exposure to estrogen, do not use black tea.
  • High Blood Pressure: The caffeine in black tea might increase blood pressure in people with high blood pressure. However, this does not seem to occur in people who drink black tea or other caffeinated products regularly.
  • Brittle Bones (Osteoporosis): Drinking caffeinated black tea can increase the amount of calcium that is flushed out in the urine. This might weaken bones. Do not drink more than 300 mg of caffeine per day (approximately 2 to 3 cups of black tea). Taking extra calcium may help to make up for calcium losses. Older women who have a genetic condition that affects the way they use vitamin D, should use caffeine with caution.


  • MEDICATION INTERACTIONS

    MODERATE INTERACTIONS - Be cautious with these combinations.

  • Adenosine (Adenocard): Black tea contains caffeine. The caffeine in black tea might block the affects of adenosine (Adenocard). Adenosine (Adenocard) is often used by health practitioners to do a test on the heart. This test is called a cardiac stress test. Stop drinking black tea or other caffeine-containing products at least 24 hours before a cardiac stress test.
  • Antibiotics (Quinolone Antibiotics): The body breaks down caffeine to get rid of it. Some antibiotics might decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine. Taking these antibiotics along with black tea can increase the risk of side effects including jitteriness, headache, increased heart rate, and other side effects. Some antibiotics that decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine include ciprofloxacin (Cipro), enoxacin (Penetrex), norfloxacin (Chibroxin, Noroxin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), trovafloxacin (Trovan), and grepafloxacin (Raxar).
  • Cimetidine (Tagamet): Black tea contains caffeine. The body breaks down caffeine to get rid of it. Cimetidine (Tagamet) can decrease how quickly your body breaks down caffeine. Taking cimetidine (Tagamet) along with black tea might increase the chance of caffeine side effects including jitteriness, headache, fast heartbeat, and others.
  • Clozapine (Clozaril): The body breaks down clozapine (Clozaril) to get rid of it. The caffeine in black tea seems to decrease how quickly the body breaks down clozapine (Clozaril). Taking black tea along with clozapine (Clozaril) can increase the effects and side effects of clozapine (Clozaril).
  • Dipyridamole (Persantine): Black tea contains caffeine. The caffeine in black tea might block the affects of dipyridamole (Persantine). Dipyridamole (Persantine) is often used by doctors to do a test on the heart. This test is called a cardiac stress test. Stop drinking black tea or other caffeine-containing products at least 24 hours before a cardiac stress test.
  • Disulfiram (Antabuse): The body breaks down caffeine to get rid of it. Disulfiram (Antabuse) can decrease how quickly the body gets rid of caffeine. Taking black tea (which contains caffeine) along with disulfiram (Antabuse) might increase the effects and side effects of caffeine including jitteriness, hyperactivity, irritability, and others.
  • Ephedrine: Stimulant drugs speed up the nervous system. Black tea contains caffeine. Caffeine and ephedrine are both stimulant drugs. Taking black tea along with ephedrine might cause too much stimulation and sometimes serious side effects and heart problems. Do not take caffeine containing products and ephedrine at the same time.
  • Estrogens: The body breaks down the caffeine in black tea to get rid of it. Estrogens can decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine. Taking estrogen pills and drinking black tea can cause jitteriness, headache, fast heartbeat, and other side effects. If you take estrogen pills, limit your caffeine intake. Some estrogen pills include conjugated equine estrogens (Premarin), ethinyl estradiol, estradiol, and others.
  • Fluvoxamine (Luvox): The body breaks down the caffeine in black tea to get rid of it. Fluvoxamine (Luvox) can decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine. Taking caffeine along with fluvoxamine (Luvox) might cause too much caffeine in the body, and increase the effects and side effects of caffeine.
  • Lithium: Your body naturally gets rid of lithium. The caffeine in black tea can increase how quickly your body gets rid of lithium. If you take products that contain caffeine and you take lithium, stop taking caffeine products slowly. Stopping caffeine too quickly can increase the side effects of lithium.
  • Asthma Medications (Beta-Adrenergic Agonists): Black tea contains caffeine. Caffeine can stimulate the heart. Some medications for asthma can also stimulate the heart. Taking caffeine with some medications for asthma might cause too much stimulation and cause heart problems. Some medications for asthma include albuterol (Proventil, Ventolin, Volmax), metaproterenol (Alupent), terbutaline (Bricanyl, Brethine), and isoproterenol (Isuprel).
  • Depression Medications (MAOIs): The caffeine in black tea can stimulate the body. Some medications used for depression can also stimulate the body. Drinking black tea and taking some medications for depression might cause too much stimulation of the body and serious side effects including fast heartbeat, high blood pressure, nervousness, and others. Some of these medications used for depression include phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), and others.
  • Medications To Slow Blood Clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet Drugs): Black tea might slow blood clotting. Taking black tea along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.
  • Pentobarbital (Nembutal): The stimulant effects of the caffeine in black tea can block the sleep-producing effects of pentobarbital.
  • Phenylpropanolamine: The caffeine in black tea can stimulate the body. Phenylpropanolamine can also stimulate the body. Taking caffeine and phenylpropanolamine together might cause too much stimulation and increase heartbeat, blood pressure, and cause nervousness.
  • Riluzole (Rilutek): The body breaks down riluzole (Rilutek) to get rid of it. Drinking black tea can decrease how quickly the body breaks down riluzole (Rilutek) and increase the effects and side effects of riluzole.
  • Stimulant Drugs: Stimulant drugs speed up the nervous system. By speeding up the nervous system, stimulant medications can make you feel jittery and speed up your heartbeat. The caffeine in black tea can also speed up the nervous system. Drinking black tea along with stimulant drugs might cause serious problems including increased heart rate and high blood pressure. Avoid taking stimulant drugs along with black tea. Some stimulant drugs include diethylpropion (Tenuate), epinephrine, phentermine (Ionamin), pseudoephedrine (Sudafed), and many others.
  • Theophylline: Black tea contains caffeine. Caffeine works similarly to theophylline. Caffeine can also decrease how quickly the body gets rid of theophylline. This might cause increased effects and side effects of theophylline.
  • Verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan): The body breaks down the caffeine in black tea to get rid of it. Verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan) can decrease how quickly the body gets rid of caffeine. Drinking black tea and taking verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan) can increase the risk of side effects for caffeine including jitteriness, headache, and an increased heartbeat.
  • Warfarin (Coumadin): Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. Large amounts of black tea might decrease how well warfarin (Coumadin) slows blood clotting. Decreasing how well warfarin (Coumadin) slows blood clotting might increase the risk of clotting. It is unclear why this interaction might occur. Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.


  • MINOR INTERACTIONS - Be watchful with this combination.

  • Alcohol: The body breaks down the caffeine in black tea to get rid of it. Alcohol can decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine. Taking black tea along with alcohol might cause too much caffeine in the bloodstream and caffeine side effects including jitteriness, headache, and fast heartbeat.
  • Birth Control Pills (Contraceptive Drugs): The body breaks down the caffeine in black tea to get rid of it. Birth control pills can decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine. Taking black tea along with birth control pills can cause jitteriness, headache, fast heartbeat, and other side effects. Some birth control pills include ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel (Triphasil), ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone (Ortho-Novum 1/35, Ortho-Novum 7/7/7), and others.
  • Fluconazole (Diflucan): Black tea contains caffeine. The body breaks down caffeine to get rid of it. Fluconazole (Diflucan) might decrease how quickly the body gets rid of caffeine. This could cause caffeine to stay in the body too long and increase the risk of side effects such as nervousness, anxiety, and insomnia.
  • Depression Medications (Tricyclic Antidepressants): Black tea contains chemicals called tannins. Tannins can bind to many medications and decrease how much medicine the body absorbs. To avoid this interaction, avoid black tea 1 hour before and 2 hours after taking medications for depression called tricyclic antidepressants. Some medications for depression include amitriptyline (Elavil) or imipramine (Tofranil, Janimine).
  • Diabetes Medications (Antidiabetes Drugs): Black tea might increase blood sugar. Diabetes medications are used to lower blood sugar. By increasing blood sugar, black tea might decrease the effectiveness of diabetes medications. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed. Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.
  • Mexiletine (Mexitil): Black tea contains caffeine. The body breaks down caffeine to get rid of it. Mexiletine (Mexitil) can decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine. Taking Mexiletine (Mexitil) along with black tea might increase the caffeine effects and side effects of black tea.
  • Phenothiazines: Black tea contains chemicals called tannins. Tannins can bind to many medications and decrease how much medicine the body absorbs. To avoid this interaction, avoid black tea 1 hour before and 2 hours after taking phenothiazine medications. Some phenothiazine medications include fluphenazine (Permitil, Prolixin), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), prochlorperazine (Compazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), and trifluoperazine (Stelazine).
  • Terbinafine (Lamisil): The body breaks down the caffeine in black tea to get rid of it. Terbinafine (Lamisil) can decrease how quickly the body gets rid of caffeine and increase the risk of side effects including jitteriness, headache, increased heartbeat, and other effects.


  • HERBAL & SUPPLEMENT INTERACTIONS

  • Bitter Orange: Using bitter orange along with other products that contain caffeine, such as black tea, can increase blood pressure and heart rate in otherwise healthy adults with normal blood pressure. This could increase the risk of serious heart problems.
  • Caffeine-Containing Herbs & Supplements: Black tea contains caffeine. Using it along with other herbs and supplements that contain caffeine might increase the risk of caffeine side effects. Natural products that contain caffeine include coffee, black tea, green tea, oolong tea, guarana, mate, and others.
  • Calcium: High caffeine intake from foods and beverages, including black tea, flushes calcium out of the body in the urine.
  • Creatine: There is some concern that combining caffeine, an ingredient in black tea, with ephedra and creatine might increase the risk of serious harmful effects. There is a report of stroke in an athlete who consumed 6 grams of creatine monohydrate, 400 to 600 mg of caffeine, 40 to 60 mg of ephedra, and a variety of other supplements daily for 6 weeks. Caffeine might also decrease whatever benefit creatine might have on athletic performance.
  • Ephedra (Ma huang): Ephedra and black tea are both stimulants. They speed up the central nervous system. Using them together might speed it up too much, increasing the risk of high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, seizures, and death. Don't take black tea with ephedra or other stimulants.
  • Herbs & Supplements For Slowing Blood Clotting: Black tea might slow blood clotting. Using it along with other herbs and supplements that might also slow blood clotting could increase the risk of bruising and bleeding in some people. Some of these herbs include angelica, clove, danshen, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, Panax ginseng, and others.
  • Iron: Black tea might interfere with the body's ability to absorb iron. This probably is not a problem for most people, unless they are iron-deficient. If this is the case, drink tea between meals rather than with meals to lessen this interaction.
  • Lithium: Black tea contains caffeine. Using herbs and supplements that contain caffeine can speed up the removal of lithium from the body.
  • Magnesium: Drinking large amounts of black tea can increase the amount of magnesium that is flushed out in the urine.


  • FOOD INTERACTIONS

  • Iron: Black tea might interfere with the body's ability to absorb iron. This probably is not a problem for most people, unless they are iron-deficient. If this is the case, drink tea between meals rather than with meals to lessen this interaction.
  • Milk: Adding milk to black tea appears to reduce some of the heart health benefits of drinking tea. Milk might bind with the antioxidants in tea and keep them from being absorbed. However, not all research confirms this. More evidence is needed to determine just how important this interaction, if any, might be.





  • BLACK TEA PRODUCTS

  • Black Tea Herbal Products

  • Tea Brewing Supply Products


  • QUALITY SUPPLIES & PRODUCTS


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    BLACK TEA HERBAL PRODUCTS

    Classic and enduring, black tea is a revered classic throughout the world. Because of the fermentation process, black tea is usually richer in color, more penetrating in flavor, and has a higher concentration of caffeine when compared to other teas. A universal beverage that speaks many languages, Black tea has its beginnings from the same plant which produces both green and white tea (Camellia sinensis), and its mark of distinction can be found in the deep dark color achieved through the fermenting process. For those who prefer milder flavors, you can add a dash of honey, cream, or soymilk for a truly delightful sipping experience.

    STARWEST BOTANICALS PRODUCTS

    Starwest Botanicals: Lychee Black Tea, Organic, Camellia Sinensis, 1 lb.
    A base of black OP Leaf scented with the essence of the Lychee fruit. This tea has a natural, sweet and very aromatic character.
    Starwest Botanicals: China Black Tea, Organic FOP, Camellia Sinensis, 1 lb.
    This full flavored FOP tea from China brews to be a rich brown cup.
    Starwest Botanicals: China Black Tea, BOP, Camellia Sinensis, 1 lb.
    Withered, rolled, fermented and dried, this tea produces a dark, full-bodied cup of tea.
    Starwest Botanicals: English Breakfast Tea, Camellia Sinensis, 1 lb.
    A blend of Chinese Black OP and Keemum Tea. This tea has a full bodied and robust flavor.
    Starwest Botanicals: Oolong Tea, Camellia Sinensis, 1 lb.
    Partially oxidized tea yielding a mild aromatic flavor between that of black and green tea. Oolong tea is commonly served as the house tea in Chinese restaurants in the US.
    Starwest Botanicals: Keemun Tea, Camellia Sinensis, 1 lb.
    Due to its superb bouquet, this north China black tea is often referred to as the "burgundy of teas". This full-bodied, sweet liquoring tea produces a dark red cup with a strong aroma resembling both fruit and roses. Keemum is considered one of the best China black teas. It makes an excellent "English Breakfast" and is useful for ice tea, in that it does not cloud easily.
    Starwest Botanicals: Chai Spice Black Tea, Fair Trade, Choice Organic, 20 Tea Bags
    This distinctive organic chai favors the rich Assam black teas of the Brahmapurra Valley, and highly prized Cardamom. Make this tea strong, and temper it with milk and sweetener.
    Starwest Botanicals: Chai Black Tea, Yogi Teas, 16 Tea Bags
    An authentic, rich and spicy blend, which has been a mainstay in northern India for centuries. The classic spices of organic cinnamon, cardamom, ginger and clove buds are mixed with organic Assam black tea to capture this truly authentic flavor. After brewing, add milk or a milk substitute and sweetener to create an exquisite taste that is delightfully unique to chai.
    Starwest Botanicals: Black Tea, Fair Trade Organic, Choice Organic, 16 Tea Bags
    One of the purest teas on Earth, brisk and bright in character. From organic mountain-top gardens, tucked deeply into the interior of a protected wildlife preserve in the South of India.
    Starwest Botanicals: Earl Grey Black Tea, Choice Organic, 16 Tea Bags
    Starwest Botanicals: Oolong Tea, Choice Organic, 16 Tea Bags


    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbsPro: Russian Caravan Black Tea, Choice Organic Teas, 16 Tea Bags (109532)
    HerbsPro: English Breakfast Decaffeinated Black Tea, Choice Organic Teas, 16 Tea Bags (109515)
    HerbsPro: Masala Chai Black Tea, Choice Organic Teas, 16 Tea Bags (109523)
    HerbsPro: Wild Forest Black Tea, Choice Organic Teas, 16 Tea Bags (109535)
    HerbsPro: Berry Black Tea, Numi Tea, 16 Tea Bags (89257)
    HerbsPro: Golden Chai Black Tea, Numi Tea, 18 Tea Bags (49655)
    HerbsPro: Chinese Breakfast Black Tea, Numi Tea, 18 Tea Bags (49637)
    HerbsPro: Chai Spice Gourmet Black Tea, Choice Organic Teas, 20 Tea Bags (109538)
    HerbsPro: Premium Black Tea, Prince of Peace, 100 Tea Bags (66354)


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Black Tea Grocery & Gourmet Food Products

    Note: The merchants above all have many more Black Teas selections in various delicious flavors and blends not included on this page. Click on one of the links above and do a store search to find a specific blend and brand of black tea that you may be searching for. The flavors included here are basic common black teas.

  • Nutrition Basics: Black Tea Herbal Information



  • TEA BREWING SUPPLY PRODUCTS

    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Tea Brewing Supplies Grocery & Gourmet Food Products
    Amazon: Tea Brewing Supplies Home & Kitchen Products

  • Nutrition Basics: Black Tea Herbal Information






  • MoonDragon's Womens Health Index

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    Health & Wellness Index





    AROMATHERAPY: ESSENTIAL OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Allspice Leaf Oil
    Angelica Oil
    Anise Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Basil Oil
    Bay Laurel Oil
    Bay Oil
    Benzoin Oil
    Bergamot Oil
    Black Pepper Oil
    Chamomile (German) Oil
    Cajuput Oil
    Calamus Oil
    Camphor (White) Oil
    Caraway Oil
    Cardamom Oil
    Carrot Seed Oil
    Catnip Oil
    Cedarwood Oil
    Chamomile Oil
    Cinnamon Oil
    Citronella Oil
    Clary-Sage Oil
    Clove Oil
    Coriander Oil
    Cypress Oil
    Dill Oil
    Eucalyptus Oil
    Fennel Oil
    Fir Needle Oil
    Frankincense Oil
    Geranium Oil
    German Chamomile Oil
    Ginger Oil
    Grapefruit Oil
    Helichrysum Oil
    Hyssop Oil
    Iris-Root Oil
    Jasmine Oil
    Juniper Oil
    Labdanum Oil
    Lavender Oil
    Lemon-Balm Oil
    Lemongrass Oil
    Lemon Oil
    Lime Oil
    Longleaf-Pine Oil
    Mandarin Oil
    Marjoram Oil
    Mimosa Oil
    Myrrh Oil
    Myrtle Oil
    Neroli Oil
    Niaouli Oil
    Nutmeg Oil
    Orange Oil
    Oregano Oil
    Palmarosa Oil
    Patchouli Oil
    Peppermint Oil
    Peru-Balsam Oil
    Petitgrain Oil
    Pine-Long Leaf Oil
    Pine-Needle Oil
    Pine-Swiss Oil
    Rosemary Oil
    Rose Oil
    Rosewood Oil
    Sage Oil
    Sandalwood Oil
    Savory Oil
    Spearmint Oil
    Spikenard Oil
    Swiss-Pine Oil
    Tangerine Oil
    Tea-Tree Oil
    Thyme Oil
    Vanilla Oil
    Verbena Oil
    Vetiver Oil
    Violet Oil
    White-Camphor Oil
    Yarrow Oil
    Ylang-Ylang Oil
    Aromatherapy
    Healing Baths For Colds
    Aromatherapy
    Herbal Cleansers
    Using Essential Oils


    AROMATHERAPY: HERBAL & CARRIER OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Almond, Sweet Oil
    Apricot Kernel Oil
    Argan Oil
    Arnica Oil
    Avocado Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Black Cumin Oil
    Black Currant Oil
    Black Seed Oil
    Borage Seed Oil
    Calendula Oil
    Camelina Oil
    Castor Oil
    Coconut Oil
    Comfrey Oil
    Evening Primrose Oil
    Flaxseed Oil
    Grapeseed Oil
    Hazelnut Oil
    Hemp Seed Oil
    Jojoba Oil
    Kukui Nut Oil
    Macadamia Nut Oil
    Meadowfoam Seed Oil
    Mullein Oil
    Neem Oil
    Olive Oil
    Palm Oil
    Plantain Oil
    Plum Kernel Oil
    Poke Root Oil
    Pomegranate Seed Oil
    Pumpkin Seed Oil
    Rosehip Seed Oil
    Safflower Oil
    Sea Buckthorn Oil
    Sesame Seed Oil
    Shea Nut Oil
    Soybean Oil
    St. Johns Wort Oil
    Sunflower Oil
    Tamanu Oil
    Vitamin E Oil
    Wheat Germ Oil





    HELPFUL RELATED MOONDRAGON NUTRITION BASICS LINKS

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Amino Acids Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Antioxidants Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Enzymes Information
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Herbs Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Homeopathics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Hydrosols Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Minerals Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Mineral Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary & Cosmetic Supplements Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary Supplements Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Specialty Supplements
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Introduction


  • NUTRITION BASICS ARTICLES

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: 4 Basic Nutrients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Foods That Contain Additives & Artificial Ingredients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Is Aspartame A Safe Sugar Substitute?
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Guidelines For Selecting & Preparing Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Destroy
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Heal
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: The Micronutrients: Vitamins & Minerals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Overcooking Your Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Phytochemicals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Increase Your Consumption of Raw Produce
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Limit Your Use of Salt
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Use Proper Cooking Utensils
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Choosing The Best Water & Types of Water





  • RELATED MOONDRAGON HEALTH LINKS & INFORMATION

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Analysis Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Diet Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Recipe Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Therapy: Preparing Produce for Juicing
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Additives Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Safety Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Articles
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Back Pain
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Labor & Birth
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Blending Chart
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Essential Oil Details
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Miscarriage
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Post Partum
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Childbearing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Problems in Pregnancy & Birthing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #1
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #2
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Tips
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Uses
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Information Overview
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Touch & Movement Therapies Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy: Touch & Movement: Aromatherapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Therapy: Touch & Movement - Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Therapeutic Massage
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 1
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 2
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Hydrotherapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Pain Control Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Relaxation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Steam Inhalation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy - Herbal Oils Index







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