animated goddess mdbs banner animated goddess


MoonDragon's Health & Wellness
Nutrition Basics

Antioxidants
LYCOPENE


For Informational Use Only
For more detailed information contact your health care provider
about options that may be available for your specific situation.





  • Antioxidant Overview
  • Lycopene Decription
  • Lycopene Uses, Health Benefits & Scientific Evidence
  • Lycopene Dosage Information
  • Lycopene Safety, Cautions & Interactions
  • Lycopene Supplement Products




  • ANTIOXIDANT OVERVIEW

    FREE RADICAL FIGHTER

    Antioxidants are vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients that protect and repair cells from damage caused by free radicals. Many experts believe this damage plays a part in a number of chronic diseases, including hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), cancer, and arthritis. Free radicals can also interfere with your immune system. So, fighting off damage with antioxidants helps keep your immune system strong, making you better able to ward off colds, flu, and other infections.

    Antioxidants are compounds that neutralize the cellular-damaging effects of free radicals. Free radicals are produced naturally in your body, but when you exercise hard, your body pumps out more free radicals. Environmental factors such as pollution, the sun, cigarette smoke, and herbicides can also spawn free radicals. The danger is that free-radical damage may lead to cancer. Antioxidants interact with and stabilize free radicals and may prevent some of the damage that free radicals otherwise might cause. As an active person, more antioxidants may help you slow the aging process, ward off cancer and stress, and promote good health.





    lycopene-rich tomatoes and ketchup


    LYCOPENE DESCRIPTION

    A CAROTENOID ANTIOXIDANT

    Lycopene is a major carotenoid that provides the red color in tomatoes, and is widely used in North American and European diets. Recent studies implicate Lycopene in the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular disease. A diet rich in foods containing carotenoids is associated with a variety of health benefits due to its ability to protect cells against oxidative damage. Lycopene can also be found in raw apricots, papaya, pink grapefruit, guava, and watermelon; however, cooking tomatoes improves absorption into the body, and tomato paste offers an even greater absorption rate.

    lycopene-rich foods


    Lycopene (from the New Latin word lycopersicum, referring to the tomato species) is a bright red carotene and carotenoid pigment and phytochemical found in tomatoes and other red fruits and vegetables, such as red carrots, red bell peppers, watermelons, gac, and papayas (but not strawberries or cherries). Although lycopene is chemically a carotene, it has no vitamin A activity.

    In plants, algae, and other photosynthetic organisms, lycopene is an important intermediate in the biosynthesis of many carotenoids, including beta carotene, responsible for yellow, orange or red pigmentation, photosynthesis, and photo-protection. Like all carotenoids, lycopene is a polyunsaturated hydrocarbon (an unsubstituted alkene). Structurally, it is a tetraterpene assembled from eight isoprene units, composed entirely of carbon and hydrogen, and is insoluble in water. Lycopene's eleven conjugated double bonds give it its deep red color and are responsible for its antioxidant activity. Due to its strong color and non-toxicity, lycopene is a useful food coloring (registered as E160d) and is approved for usage in the USA, Australia and New Zealand (registered as 160d) and the EU.

    Lycopene is not an essential nutrient for humans, but is commonly found in the diet, mainly from dishes prepared from tomatoes. When absorbed from the stomach, lycopene is transported in the blood by various lipoproteins and accumulates in the liver, adrenal glands, and testes.

    Because preliminary research has shown an inverse correlation between consumption of tomatoes and cancer risk, lycopene has been considered a potential agent for prevention of some types of cancers, particularly prostate cancer. However, this area of research and the relationship with prostate cancer have been deemed insufficient of evidence for health claim approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (see below under Antioxidant properties and potential health benefits).

    lycopene molecule


    LYCOPENE CHEMISTRY - STRUCTURE & PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

    Lycopene is a symmetrical tetraterpene assembled from 8 isoprene units. It is a member of the carotenoid family of compounds, and because it consists entirely of carbon and hydrogen, is also a carotene. Isolation procedures for lycopene were first reported in 1910, and the structure of the molecule was determined by 1931. In its natural, all-trans form, the molecule is long and straight, constrained by its system of eleven conjugated double bonds. Each extension in this conjugated system reduces the energy required for electrons to transition to higher energy states, allowing the molecule to absorb visible light of progressively longer wavelengths. Lycopene absorbs all but the longest wavelengths of visible light, so it appears red.

    Plants and photosynthetic bacteria naturally produce all-trans lycopene, but a total of 72 geometric isomers of the molecule are sterically possible. When exposed to light or heat, lycopene can undergo isomerization to any of a number of these cis-isomers, which have a bent rather than linear shape. Different isomers were shown to have different stabilities due to their molecular energy (highest stability: 5-cis ≥ all-trans ≥ 9-cis ≥ 13-cis > 15-cis > 7-cis > 11-cis: lowest). In the human bloodstream, various cis-isomers constitute more than 60 percent of the total lycopene concentration, but the biological effects of individual isomers have not been investigated.

    LYCOPENE STAINING & REMOVAL

    Lycopene is insoluble in water, and can be dissolved only in organic solvents and oils. Because of its non-polarity, lycopene in food preparations will stain any sufficiently porous material, including most plastics. While a tomato stain can be fairly easily removed from fabric (provided the stain is fresh), lycopene diffuses into plastic, making it impossible to remove with hot water or detergent. If lycopene is oxidized (for example, by reacting with bleaches or acids), the double bonds between the carbon atoms will be broken; cleaving the molecule, breaking the conjugated double bond system, and eliminating the chromophore.

    LYCOPENE ROLE IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS

    Lycopene is a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of many carotenoids.Carotenoids like lycopene are important pigments found in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes in plants, photosynthetic bacteria, fungi, and algae. They are responsible for the bright colors of fruits and vegetables, perform various functions in photosynthesis, and protect photosynthetic organisms from excessive light damage. Lycopene is a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of many important carotenoids, such as beta-carotene, and xanthophylls.

    LYCOPENE BIOSYNTHESIS

    The unconditioned biosynthesis of lycopene in eukaryotic plants and in prokaryotic cyanobacteria is similar, as are the enzymes involved. Synthesis begins with mevalonic acid, which is converted into dimethylallyl pyrophosphate. This is then condensed with three molecules of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (an isomer of dimethylallyl pyrophosphate), to give the twenty carbon geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. Two molecules of this product are then condensed in a tail-to-tail configuration to give the forty carbon phytoene, the first committed step in carotenoid biosynthesis. Through several desaturation steps, phytoene is converted into lycopene. The two terminal isoprene groups of lycopene can be cyclized to produce beta carotene, which can then be transformed into a wide variety of xanthophylls.





    lycopene in tomatoes, tomato juice, sauce and paste


    LYCOPENE USES, HEALTH BENEFITS & SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE

    Lycopene supplementation is used to help treat many types of cancers, including prostate, breast, colon, and skin cancer. Additionally, Lycopene can help prevent cardiovascular disease. Some scientific studies suggest that Lycopene can also lower cholesterol levels, and insulin levels in diabetics as well. Studies in the United Kingdom suggest that Lycopene helps boost your immune system.

    Studies that looked at lycopene levels in the blood found that levels were higher after people ate cooked tomatoes than after they ate raw tomatoes or drank tomato juice. This suggests that lycopene in cooked tomato products such as tomato sauce or paste may be more readily absorbed by the body than lycopene in raw tomatoes. Eating lycopene-rich vegetables and fruits together with a small amount of oil or fat (for example, salad oil or cheese on pizza) increases the amount of lycopene absorbed by the intestines. Lycopene is also available in soft-gel capsule and liquid supplements. Dosages vary according to manufacturer.

    In recent years, the role of the diet in preventing cancer has been a popular and important area of research. The examination of the role of carotenoids, specifically beta carotene, in preventing cancer began in the 1920s. However, interest in lycopene did not really begin until the late 1980s when it was found that the antioxidant activity of lycopene was twice that of beta carotene.

    PRELIMINARY RESEARCH

    In vitro, lycopene quenches singlet oxygen more efficiently than vitamin E, which in turn is more efficient than glutathione. In addition, a lycopene metabolite, apo-10'-lycopenal, may be important in metabolism of hepatic lipids. In laboratory research, accumulation of liver lipids can result in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, such as, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Given its potential properties in vivo, substantial research has been devoted to a possible correlation between lycopene consumption and general health. Preliminary research suggested potential effect on cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis, and male infertility, but these effects remain unconfirmed.

    Some studies analyzed anti-cancer properties of lycopene, although have been primarily inconclusive. Evidence for lycopene's possible effect was found in cancers of the lung, stomach, colon, breast, endometrium and prostate gland. Lycopene may reduce risk of cancer by activating special cancer preventive enzymes such as phase II detoxification enzymes, but its mechanism of action in vivo remains unknown.

    In one study of lycopene as an inhibitor of human cancer cell proliferation, it was found that unlike cancer cells, human fibroblasts were less sensitive to lycopene, and the cells gradually escaped growth inhibition over time. In addition to its possible inhibitory effect on basal endometrial cancer cell proliferation, lycopene also was found to suppress insulin-like growth factor-I-stimulated growth. Lycopene effect on the autocrine/paracrine system may lead to research on the regulation of endometrial cancer and other tumors.


    CANCER PREVENTION EVIDENCE


    Studies that look at large groups of people (observational studies) in many countries have shown that the risk for some types of cancer is lower in people who have higher levels of lycopene in their blood. Studies suggest that diets rich in tomatoes may account for this reduction in risk. Evidence is strongest for lycopene's protective effect against cancer of the lung, stomach, and prostate. It may also help to protect against cancer of the cervix, breast, mouth, pancreas, esophagus, and colon and rectum.

    Some population studies have found that a diet high in lycopene from tomato-based foods was linked with a lower risk of prostate cancer. Other studies, however, found no link between tomato products or other lycopene-rich foods and prostate cancer. A recent study suggested that variation in a particular gene (known as XRCC1) that helps repair damaged DNA influences whether lycopene intake will affect a man's prostate cancer risk.

    A 2004 review that analyzed 21 observational studies (that is, not clinical trials) concluded that tomato products appear to have a weak protective effect against prostate cancer. This review did not include lycopene supplements, only tomato and tomato-based foods. Some of the individual studies, however, did consider lycopene levels in the blood. The analysis noted that the protective effect was slightly stronger for cooked tomato products and that small amounts of added fat improved lycopene absorption. On the other hand, 2 studies from 2007, one of about 1,500 men and the second of more than 28,000 men, found no difference in blood lycopene levels between those in whom prostate cancer later developed and those in whom it did not. Such mixed results sometimes happen when there is no effect or only a small effect from the substance being looked at.

    There have been several experimental studies on the role of lycopene in preventing or treating cancer. One animal study found that lycopene treatment reduced the growth of brain tumors. Another animal study showed that frequent intake of lycopene over a long period of time considerably suppressed breast tumor growth in mice. But breast cancer in humans is very different from breast cancer in mice, and those results may not apply to the disease in humans. There has been a human study that assigned men at high risk for prostate cancer to take an ordinary multivitamin either with or without a lycopene supplement. This study found no difference in prostate-specific antigen (PSA, a marker of prostate cancer) levels between the 2 groups. Further studies are needed to find out if any possible anti-cancer properties could benefit humans.

    Since tomatoes also contain vitamins, potassium, and other carotenoids and antioxidants, it may be that other compounds in tomatoes may account for some of the protective effects first thought to be due to lycopene. These compounds may act alone or along with lycopene. When researchers look at large population groups with different lifestyles and habits, it is also possible that their findings can be explained by other factors that were not examined.

    To test whether lycopene is the main cancer-fighting substance in tomatoes, one animal study compared lycopene supplements to powdered tomatoes. Groups of rats who were fed tomato powder were compared to rats given lycopene. The rats that received tomato powder had much lower cancer risk, whereas the rats receiving lycopene supplements did not differ significantly from the group that received no special supplements.

    A controlled study in a small group of men with prostate cancer found that lycopene supplements appeared to reduce the rapid growth of prostate cancer cells. However, a more recent study with men whose prostate cancer had stopped responding to hormone therapy found that lycopene did not have a significant effect. One short-term study from 2006 reported that lycopene supplements were safe, but that they did not lower the levels of prostate-specific antigen (a marker of prostate cancer) in men with prostate cancer that had come back. Another reported that the combination of lycopene and soy supplements prevented PSA levels from increasing in some men with prostate cancer.

    The few clinical trials that have been completed have reported mainly the short-term effects on the level of PSA in the blood, which is generally considered a good indicator of prostate cancer growth. Although these studies are an important step, they are not as valuable as long-term studies that look at whether a treatment actually helps patients live longer or relieves their symptoms.

    Most of the human studies that have been published so far were case control studies or other observational studies, which are more prone to error than clinical trials are. More information from clinical trials (including results of several studies already under way) will be needed to be sure whether lycopene-rich foods can help prevent or treat cancer. There are also studies to find out if there are other benefits from lycopene.

    ACS NUTRITION GUIDELINES

    Choosing foods from a variety of fruits, vegetables, and other plant sources such as nuts, seeds, whole grains, and beans is likely to be healthier than eating large amounts of one type of food. The American Cancer Society's most recent nutrition guidelines recommend eating a balanced diet with an emphasis on plant sources, which includes:
    • 5 or more servings of vegetables and fruit each day.
    • Choosing whole grains over processed and refined grains.
    • Limiting processed meats and red meats.
    • Balancing calorie intake with physical activity to get to or stay at a healthy weight.
    • Limiting alcohol intake.

    Based on today's evidence, the foods you eat are likely to play a greater role in preventing cancer than in treating it.


    The FDA review permitted a highly limited qualified claim to be used for tomatoes and tomato products which contain lycopene, as a guide that would not mislead consumers, namely: Very limited and preliminary scientific research suggests that eating one-half to one cup of tomatoes and/or tomato sauce a week may reduce the risk of prostate cancer. FDA concludes that there is little scientific evidence supporting this claim. One preliminary study found a diet rich in lycopene via tomatoes may reduce risk of ischemic stroke.



    LYCOPENE BENEFITS


    At a recent conference, sponsored by the Center for Food and Nutrition Policy (CFNP) at Virginia Technical Institute, in Washington, D.C., researchers reported that they are finding more health benefits of lycopene, a pigment that gives many fruits and vegetables their red color.

    One researcher at the conference, Dr. Leticia Rao from the University of Toronto, explained that lycopene's function as an antioxidant prevents free radicals from disrupting the balance of new bone formation with the bone loss that naturally occurs with age. When that balance is thrown off, bone loss exceeds bone formation, causing the brittle bone disease osteoporosis.

    Another researcher, Dr. Yoav Sharoni of Ben-Gurion University, reported that oral lycopene had a protective effect against UV skin damage, which suggested a potential inverse connection between lycopene and skin cancer. He explained that while sunscreens provide external protection from damaging UV rays, antioxidants like lycopene in the diet might provide internal protection from sunburn.

    Previous research has found that the benefits of lycopene appear to affect parts of the body where lycopene concentration is highest, such as in the prostate gland. New research suggests a potential benefit for bone and skin health, and male infertility.

    Lycopene is an antioxidant which appears to prevent the formation of harmful by-products of metabolism called free radicals. Free radicals are thought to be responsible for damaging the body's cells, as well as their genetic makeup, leading to certain chronic diseases.

    Researchers have currently not found any side effects from eating foods that have lycopene or from taking a lycopene supplement. The bottom line is that it is a beneficial substance for your body. Once you ingest it, your body gets to work using it as an antioxidant and for whatever else your body needs it for. To be safe, just make sure you are following standard dosage requirements.

    The lycopene in tomatoes may reduce sun damage by 35 percent. One cup of tomatoes daily is what you need to increase your protection from sun damage. Studies have shown that this phytonutrient neutralizes harmful free radicals created by the sunís UVA and UVB rays. To get more benefits from tomatoes, cook them first because the heat liberates three times more lycopene from the plantís tissue. Since lycopene is a lipid, for better absorption, it should be consumed with oil.


    SOURCE: www.lycopene.com





    LYCOPENE DOSAGE INFORMATION

    FOOD SOURCES

    It is important to eat an adequate amount of foods that contain Lycopene in your daily diet; however, you can take Lycopene supplements as part of your daily intake as well. For best results, read and follow product label directions.

    DIETARY SOURCES OF LYCOPENE
    SOURCE
    µg/g Wet Weight
          Gac
    2,000 to 2,300
          Raw Tomato
    8.8 to 42
          Tomato Juice
    86 to 100
          Tomato Sauce
    63 to 131
          Tomato Ketchup
    124
          Watermelon
    23 to 72
          Pink Grapefruit
    3.6 to 34
          Pink Guava
    54
          Papaya
    20 to 53
          Rosehip Puree
    7.8
          Apricot
    Less Than 0.1


    tomatoes with lycopene


    Fruits and vegetables that are high in lycopene include gac, tomatoes, watermelon, pink grapefruit, pink guava, papaya, seabuckthorn, wolfberry (goji, a berry relative of tomato), and rosehip. Although gac (Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng) has the highest content of lycopene of any known fruit or vegetable, up to 70 times more than tomatoes for example, due to gac's rarity outside its native region of southeast Asia, tomatoes and tomato-based sauces, juices, and ketchup account for more than 85-percent of the dietary intake of lycopene for most people. The lycopene content of tomatoes depends on species and increases as the fruit ripens.

    Unlike other fruits and vegetables, where nutritional content such as vitamin C is diminished upon cooking, processing of tomatoes increases the concentration of bioavailable lycopene. Lycopene in tomato paste is four times more bioavailable than in fresh tomatoes. For this reason, tomato paste is a preferable source as opposed to raw tomatoes.

    While most green leafy vegetables and other sources of lycopene are low in fats and oils, lycopene is insoluble in water and is tightly bound to vegetable fiber. Processed tomato products such as pasteurized tomato juice, soup, sauce, and ketchup contain the highest concentrations of bioavailable lycopene from tomato-based sources.

    Cooking and crushing tomatoes (as in the canning process) and serving in oil-rich dishes (such as spaghetti sauce or pizza) greatly increases assimilation from the digestive tract into the bloodstream. Lycopene is fat-soluble, so the oil is said to help absorption. Gac is a notable exception, containing high concentrations of lycopene and also saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Lycopene may be obtained from vegetables and fruits such as the tomato, but another source of lycopene is the fungus Blakeslea trispora. Gac is a promising commercial source of lycopene for the purposes of extraction and purification. The cis-lycopene from some varieties of tomato is more bioavailable.

    Note that there are some resources which make the mistaken assumption that all red fruits contain lycopene, when in fact many are pigmented by other chemicals. An example is the blood orange, which is colored by anthocyanin, while other red colored oranges, such as the Cara cara navel, and other citrus fruit, such as pink grapefruit, are colored by lycopene. In addition, some foods which do not appear red also contain lycopene, e.g., asparagus, which contains about 30 µg of lycopene per 100 gram serving and dried parsley and basil, which contain about 3.5 to 7 µ of lycopene per gram.

    After ingestion, lycopene is incorporated into lipid micelles in the small intestine. These micelles are formed from dietary fats and bile acids, and help to solubilize the hydrophobic lycopene and allow it to permeate the intestinal mucosal cells by a passive transport mechanism. Little is known about the liver metabolism of lycopene, but like other carotenoids, lycopene is incorporated into chylomicrons and released into the lymphatic system. In blood plasma, lycopene is eventually distributed into the very low and low density lipoprotein fractions. Lycopene is mainly distributed to fatty tissues and organs such as the adrenal glands, liver, prostate and testes.

    DISTRIBUTION OF LYCOPENE
    TISSUE
    nmol/g Wet Weight
        Gac
    2,000 to 2,300
        Liver
    1.28 to 5.72
        Kidney
    0.15 to 0.62
        Adrenal
    1.9 to 21.6
        Testes
    4.34 to 21.4
        Ovary
    0.25 to 0.28
        Adipose (Fat)
    0.2 to 1.3
        Lung
    0.22 to 0.57
        Colon
    0.31
        Breast
    0.78
        Skin
    0.42


    SUPPLEMENT FORMS

    Lycopene administered as a pure compound has been studied in clinical trials at dosages of 13 to 75 mg/day.

    Lycopene is mostly available in capsule and softgel form, with dosage guidelines from manufacturers ranging from 10 to 30 mg taken twice daily with meals.

    Lycopene is also incorporated in multivitamin and multimineral products.





    LYCOPENE SAFETY, CAUTIONS & INTERACTION INFORMATION

    There are no known safety issues associated with taking Lycopene supplements.

    Lycopene is non-toxic and is commonly found in the diet, but cases of excessive carotenoid intake have been reported. In a middle aged woman who had prolonged and excessive consumption of tomato juice, her skin and liver were colored orange-yellow and she had elevated levels of lycopene in her blood. After three weeks on a lycopene-free diet her skin color returned to normal. This discoloration of the skin is known as lycopenodermia and is non-toxic.

    No toxic effects were observed in rats treated with lycopene 2,000 mg/kg/day for 28 days, an intake similar to approximately 200 mg of lycopene per kg (2.2 pounds) of body weight per day in humans. Another 13-week toxicity study generated similar results. Keep in mind, this is an extremely high dosage - for example, a 110 pound person, this would be a daily dosage of 10,000 mg, or 10 grams of lycopene. Daily recommended dosage is about 6 mg lycopene and most supplements range from 10 to 30 mg lycopene per dosage, taken twice daily.

    In general, tomato-based products and lycopene supplements are generally well tolerated. There are also cases of intolerance or allergic reaction to dietary lycopene, which may cause some GI complaints, such as diarrhea, dyspepsia, nausea, stomach pain or cramps, gas, vomiting, and loss of appetite. Avoid with hypersensitivity to lycopene or to any of its food sources, especially tomatoes. Tomato-based products are acidic and may irritate stomach ulcers.

    Information regarding safety and efficacy during pregnancy and lactation is lacking. The amount of lycopene in foods is assumed to be safe. Tomato consumption does increase lycopene concentrations in the breast milk and plasma of lactating women.

    INTERACTIONS

    Lycopene interacts with some cancer chemotherapy agents, as well as with ciprofloxacin and olestra. Lycopene may have an additive effect when used in combination with ciprofloxacin. Because lycopene requires fat for absorption and transport, studies have documented that patients consuming olestra experienced a 30-percent reduced lycopene absorption. Consumption of lycopene and olestra should be separated by several hours.

    One trial documented a cancer-related hemorrhage in a patient taking lycopene, although the causality is unclear.





    LYCOPENE SUPPLEMENTS & RELATED PRODUCTS

  • Lycopene Supplement Products


  • QUALITY SUPPLIES & PRODUCTS


    FTC Advertising & Affilate Disclosure: This website has an affiliate relationship with certain merchants selling products and we recieve commissions from those sales to help support this website. Any products listed here are not listed by any rating system. We do not rate any product or post any feedback about products listed here. We leave this to the individual merchants to provide. We do not provide product prices or shopping carts since you do not order these products directly from us, but from the merchant providing the products. We only provide the link to that merchant webpage with all related product information and pricing. The products are listed here by merchant, product use, quantity size or volume, and for nutritional supplements - dosage per unit. All product descriptions are provided by the merchant or manufacturer and are not our descriptive review of the product. We do not endorse any specific product or attest to its effectiveness to treat any health condition or support nutritional requirements for any individual.


    LYCOPENE SUPPLEMENT PRODUCTS

    Lycopene is an antioxidant found in canned and cooked ripe tomatoes. Studies that looked at lycopene levels in the blood found that levels were higher after people ate cooked tomatoes than after they ate raw tomatoes or drank tomato juice. This suggests that lycopene in cooked tomato products such as tomato sauce or paste may be more readily absorbed by the body than lycopene in raw tomatoes. Eating lycopene-rich vegetables and fruits together with a small amount of oil or fat (for example, salad oil or cheese on pizza) increases the amount of lycopene absorbed by the intestines. Lycopene is also available in soft-gel capsule and liquid supplements. Dosages vary according to manufacturer. It is involved in energy production in many cells of the body, including muscle cells. Needed for sugar metabolism. Reduces pain. Studies that look at large groups of people (observational studies) in many countries have shown that the risk for some types of cancer is lower in people who have higher levels of lycopene in their blood. Studies suggest that diets rich in tomatoes may account for this reduction in risk. Evidence is strongest for lycopene's protective effect against cancer of the lung, stomach, and prostate. It may also help to protect against cancer of the cervix, breast, mouth, pancreas, esophagus, and colon and rectum.

    STARWEST BOTANICALS PRODUCTS

    Starwest Botanicals: Tomato Powder (Lycopersicon Esculentum), Kosher Certified, 1 lb.


    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbsPro: Lyco-Sorb Lycopene, Improves Prostate & Cardiovascular Health, Jarrow Formulas, 10 mg, 30 Softgels
    Lyco-Sorb is a completely natural, lipid-soluble delivery system, formulated to enhance absorption. Lycopene is a highly potent antioxidant carotenoid. Only natural lycopene, has shown significant results protecting prostate, skin and cholesterol health.
    HerbsPro: Lycopene, Thompson Nutritional Products, 10 mg, 30 Softgels (62879)
    HerbsPro: Tomato Lycopene, All Natural From Lyco-o-Mato, TwinLab, 10 mg, 30 Softgels (19916)
    All eyes are on Lycopene. Lycopene is an important member of the beta-carotene family. It's also the substance that gives tomatoes their rich red color. Recent research is demonstrating that lycopene is a more powerful antioxidant than ever realized. By neutralizing free radicals, lycopene has the ability to promote cardiovascular and prostate health, as well as support healthy cholesterol levels and overall immune function. Healthy individuals have the highest levels of lycopene in their bodies. Because the body cannot produce lycopene, dietary supplementation is particularly important to your health.
    HerbsPro: Lycopene, Natures Life, 10 mg, 60 Softgels (90532)
    HerbsPro: Lyco-Sorb Lycopene, Improves Prostate & Cardiovascular Health, Jarrow Formulas, 10 mg, 60 Softgels
    Lyco-Sorb is a completely natural, lipid-soluble delivery system, formulated to enhance absorption. Lycopene is a highly potent antioxidant carotenoid. Only natural lycopene, has shown significant results protecting prostate, skin and cholesterol health.
    HerbsPro: Tomato Lycopene, All Natural From Lyco-o-Mato, TwinLab, 10 mg, 60 Softgels (19915)
    All eyes are on Lycopene. Lycopene is an important member of the beta-carotene family. It's also the substance that gives tomatoes their rich red color. Recent research is demonstrating that lycopene is a more powerful antioxidant than ever realized. By neutralizing free radicals, lycopene has the ability to promote cardiovascular and prostate health, as well as support healthy cholesterol levels and overall immune function. Healthy individuals have the highest levels of lycopene in their bodies. Because the body cannot produce lycopene, dietary supplementation is particularly important to your health.
    HerbsPro: Lycopene, Life Time Nutritional Specialties, 10 mg, 60 Softgels (89791)
    HerbsPro: Lycopene, Natural Factors, 10 mg, 60 Softgels (84218)
    HerbsPro: Lycopene, Now Foods, 10 mg, 60 Softgels (68429)
    HerbsPro: Lycopene, Now Foods, 10 mg, 120 Softgels (68428)
    HerbsPro: Lycopene, Natrol, 15 mg, 30 Tabs (16773)
    HerbsPro: Lycopene, Source Naturals, 15 mg, 30 Softgels (7071)
    HerbsPro: Lycopene, Source Naturals, 15 mg, 60 Softgels (7072)
    HerbsPro: Lyc-O-Mato Lycopene, Healthy Origins, 15 mg, 60 Softgels (49883)
    HerbsPro: Mega Lycopene, Life Extension, 15 mg, 90 Softgels (91807)
    HerbsPro: Lyc-O-Mato Lycopene, Healthy Origins, 15 mg, 180 Softgels (49884)
    Lyc-O-Mato is a pure tomato product, rich in Lycopene and other natural phytochemicals. Numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of tomato Lycopene on health and well-being, and many of these controlled studies have used the Healthy Origins product Lyc-O-Mato as their source of Lycopene. A recent study by Dr. M. Aviram and his team at the Rambam Medical Center, Israel, demonstrated that Lyc-O-Mato natural tomato oleoresin greatly increases the resistance of LDL to oxidation. This protective effect of tomato Lyc-O-Mato was significantly greater than that of crystalline Beta-carotene or crystalline Lycopene derived from other sources (M. Aviram, unpublished data). Healthy Origins Lyc-O-Mato. Natural Tomato Lycopene 15 mg. Clinical-Strength. A Dietary Supplement, 15 mg capsules of tomato lycopene helped reduce the size and severity of prostate tumors in men who took the capsules twice daily. Each SoftGel provides 250 mg Lyc-O-Mato, 333 IU Vitamin A (as natural Beta-Carotene), 5.5 IU Vitamin E (as d-Alpha Tocopherol), 15 mg Lycopene, 1 mg Phytoene, 1 mg Phytofluene, 1 mg Phytosterols.
    HerbsPro: Lycopene, Bluebonnet Nutrition, 20 mg, 30 Softgels (100745)
    HerbsPro: Lycopene, Now Foods, 20 mg, 50 Softgels (68430)
    HerbsPro: Lycopene, Bluebonnet Nutrition, 20 mg, 60 Softgels (100746)
    HerbsPro: Lycopene, Natures Life, 30 mg, 30 Tabs (90542)
    HerbsPro: Lycopene Lutein Carotene Complex, Solgar, 30 VCaps (36590)
    HerbsPro: Saw Palmetto Pygeum Lycopene Complex, Solgar, 50 VCaps (36736)
    HerbsPro: Saw Palmetto Complex With Lycopene, Nutricology Allergy Research Group, 60 Softgels (18310)
    HerbsPro: Saw Palmetto Extract With Lycopene, Natural Factors, 160 mg, 60 Softgels (84444)
    HerbsPro: Saw Palmetto Extract With Lycopene, Natural Factors, 160 mg, 90 Softgels (84445)
    HerbsPro: ABC Plus Seniot With Lutein & Lycopene, Natures Bounty, 100 Tabs (97367)
    HerbsPro: Lycopene Cream, Life Extension, 1 oz. (108454)


    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Saw Palmetto Complex With Lycopene, Nutricology, 60 Softgels: N
    Kalyx: 50-Plus Mini-Tab Multi Age Defense Formula, Rainbow Light, 90 Mini-Tabs: K
    Kalyx: Active Senior SafeGuard Just Once Multivitamin, Rainbow Light, 90 Tabs: K
    Kalyx: Men's Superior Multiple Vitamin, FoodScience, 120 Tabs: K
    Kalyx: Lycopene, Kalyx Bulk Products, 10 mg, 20,000 Softgels: GF
    Kalyx: Tomato Powder, Starwest Botanicals, 1 lb: C
    Kalyx: Tomato Powder, Kalyx Bulk Products, 1 Kg (2.2 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Tomato Powder (Lycopersicon esculentum), Frontier Brand, 1 Kg (2.2 lbs): K
    Kalyx: Tomato Powder (Lycopersicon esculentum), Certified Organic, Frontier Brand, 1 Kg (2.2 lbs): K
    Kalyx: Tomato 2% Lycopene Powdered Extract, Kalyx Bulk Products, 1 Kg (2.2 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Tomato Powder, Dutch Valley, 5 lbs: GR
    Kalyx: Tomato Powder, Kalyx Bulk Products, 5 Kg (11 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Tomato 2% Lycopene Powdered Extract, Kalyx Bulk Products, 5 Kg (11 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Lycopene Natural 5%, Kalyx Bulk Products, 5 Kg (11 lbs): GF
    Kalyx: Tomato Powder, Kalyx Bulk Products, 10 Kg (22 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Tomato 2% Lycopene Powdered Extract, Kalyx Bulk Products, 10 Kg (22 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Lycopene 5%, Kalyx Bulk Products, 10 Kg (22 lbs): GF
    Kalyx: Lycopene 10% Water Soluble Fluid Suspension, Kalyx Bulk Products, 10 Kg (22 lbs): GF
    Kalyx: Lycopene 10% Water Soluble Fluid Suspension, Kalyx Bulk Products, 20 Kg (44 lbs): GF
    Kalyx: Tomato Powder Spray Dried, Certified Organic, Kalyx Bulk Products, 50 lbs (22.73 Kg): CO
    Kalyx: Tomato Powder Sun Dried, Certified Organic, Kalyx Bulk Products, 50 lbs (22.73 Kg): CO
    Kalyx: Tomato Powder, Kalyx Bulk Products, 25 Kg (55 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Tomato 2% Lycopene Powdered Extract, Kalyx Bulk Products, 25 Kg (55 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Lycopene 5% Powdered Extract, Kalyx Bulk Products, 25 Kg (55 lbs): HP
    Kalyx: Lycopene 10% Powdered Extract, Kalyx Bulk Products, 25 Kg (55 lbs): HP
    Kalyx: Tomato Powder, Kalyx Bulk Products, 50 Kg (110 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Tomato 2% Lycopene Powdered Extract, Kalyx Bulk Products, 50 Kg (110 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Tomato Powder, Kalyx Bulk Products, 100 Kg (220 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Tomato 2% Lycopene Powdered Extract, Kalyx Bulk Products, 100 Kg (220 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Tomato Powder, Kalyx Bulk Products, 200 Kg (440 lbs): EB
    Kalyx: Tomato 2% Lycopene Powdered Extract, Kalyx Bulk Products, 200 Kg (440 lbs): EB


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Lycopene Supplement Products
    Amazon: Super Antioxidant Grocery & Gourmet Food Products

  • Nutrition Basics: Lycopene Antioxidant Information
  • Nutrition Basics: Lycopene Supplement Information






  • MoonDragon's Womens Health Index

    | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |






    Health & Wellness Index





    AROMATHERAPY: ESSENTIAL OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Allspice Leaf Oil
    Angelica Oil
    Anise Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Basil Oil
    Bay Laurel Oil
    Bay Oil
    Benzoin Oil
    Bergamot Oil
    Black Pepper Oil
    Chamomile (German) Oil
    Cajuput Oil
    Calamus Oil
    Camphor (White) Oil
    Caraway Oil
    Cardamom Oil
    Carrot Seed Oil
    Catnip Oil
    Cedarwood Oil
    Chamomile Oil
    Cinnamon Oil
    Citronella Oil
    Clary-Sage Oil
    Clove Oil
    Coriander Oil
    Cypress Oil
    Dill Oil
    Eucalyptus Oil
    Fennel Oil
    Fir Needle Oil
    Frankincense Oil
    Geranium Oil
    German Chamomile Oil
    Ginger Oil
    Grapefruit Oil
    Helichrysum Oil
    Hyssop Oil
    Iris-Root Oil
    Jasmine Oil
    Juniper Oil
    Labdanum Oil
    Lavender Oil
    Lemon-Balm Oil
    Lemongrass Oil
    Lemon Oil
    Lime Oil
    Longleaf-Pine Oil
    Mandarin Oil
    Marjoram Oil
    Mimosa Oil
    Myrrh Oil
    Myrtle Oil
    Neroli Oil
    Niaouli Oil
    Nutmeg Oil
    Orange Oil
    Oregano Oil
    Palmarosa Oil
    Patchouli Oil
    Peppermint Oil
    Peru-Balsam Oil
    Petitgrain Oil
    Pine-Long Leaf Oil
    Pine-Needle Oil
    Pine-Swiss Oil
    Rosemary Oil
    Rose Oil
    Rosewood Oil
    Sage Oil
    Sandalwood Oil
    Savory Oil
    Spearmint Oil
    Spikenard Oil
    Swiss-Pine Oil
    Tangerine Oil
    Tea-Tree Oil
    Thyme Oil
    Vanilla Oil
    Verbena Oil
    Vetiver Oil
    Violet Oil
    White-Camphor Oil
    Yarrow Oil
    Ylang-Ylang Oil
    Aromatherapy
    Healing Baths For Colds
    Aromatherapy
    Herbal Cleansers
    Using Essential Oils


    AROMATHERAPY: HERBAL & CARRIER OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Almond, Sweet Oil
    Apricot Kernel Oil
    Argan Oil
    Arnica Oil
    Avocado Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Black Cumin Oil
    Black Currant Oil
    Black Seed Oil
    Borage Seed Oil
    Calendula Oil
    Camelina Oil
    Castor Oil
    Coconut Oil
    Comfrey Oil
    Evening Primrose Oil
    Flaxseed Oil
    Grapeseed Oil
    Hazelnut Oil
    Hemp Seed Oil
    Jojoba Oil
    Kukui Nut Oil
    Macadamia Nut Oil
    Meadowfoam Seed Oil
    Mullein Oil
    Neem Oil
    Olive Oil
    Palm Oil
    Plantain Oil
    Plum Kernel Oil
    Poke Root Oil
    Pomegranate Seed Oil
    Pumpkin Seed Oil
    Rosehip Seed Oil
    Safflower Oil
    Sea Buckthorn Oil
    Sesame Seed Oil
    Shea Nut Oil
    Soybean Oil
    St. Johns Wort Oil
    Sunflower Oil
    Tamanu Oil
    Vitamin E Oil
    Wheat Germ Oil





    HELPFUL RELATED MOONDRAGON NUTRITION BASICS LINKS

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Amino Acids Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Antioxidants Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Enzymes Information
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Herbs Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Homeopathics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Hydrosols Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Minerals Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Mineral Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary & Cosmetic Supplements Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary Supplements Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Specialty Supplements
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Introduction


  • NUTRITION BASICS ARTICLES

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: 4 Basic Nutrients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Foods That Contain Additives & Artificial Ingredients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Is Aspartame A Safe Sugar Substitute?
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Guidelines For Selecting & Preparing Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Destroy
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Heal
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: The Micronutrients: Vitamins & Minerals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Overcooking Your Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Phytochemicals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Increase Your Consumption of Raw Produce
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Limit Your Use of Salt
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Use Proper Cooking Utensils
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Choosing The Best Water & Types of Water





  • RELATED MOONDRAGON HEALTH LINKS & INFORMATION

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Analysis Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Diet Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Recipe Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Therapy: Preparing Produce for Juicing
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Additives Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Safety Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Articles
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Back Pain
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Labor & Birth
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Blending Chart
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Essential Oil Details
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Miscarriage
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Post Partum
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Childbearing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Problems in Pregnancy & Birthing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #1
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #2
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Tips
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Uses
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Information Overview
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Touch & Movement Therapies Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy: Touch & Movement: Aromatherapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Therapy: Touch & Movement - Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Therapeutic Massage
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 1
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 2
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Hydrotherapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Pain Control Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Relaxation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Steam Inhalation Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy - Herbal Oils Index







  • Starwest Botanicals




    HerbsPro Supplement Store


    HerbsPro




    Up to 70% Off Bath & Beauty - evitamins


    eVitamins








    Kalyx.com Herbs, Foods, Supplements, Bath & Body


    Chinese Herbs Direct


    Ayurvedic Herbs Direct


    Pet Herbs Direct


    ShareASale Merchant-Affiliate Program








    MOONDRAGON'S REALM - WEBSITE DIRECTORY


    A website map to help you find what you are looking for on MoonDragon.org's Website. Available pages have been listed under appropriate directory headings.




    Top