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MoonDragon's Health & Wellness
Disorders

HYPOTHYROIDISM
(Under-Active Thyroid)


For "Informational Use Only".
For more detailed information, contact your health care provider
about options that may be available for your specific situation.





  • Hypothyroid Description
  • Hypothyroid Frequent Signs & Symptoms
  • Hypothyroid Causes
  • Hypothyroid Conventional Medical Treatment
  • Herbal Recommendations
  • Diet & Nutritional Recommendations
  • Nutritional Supplements
  • Notify Your Health Practitioner
  • Hypothyroid Support Supplement Products




  • HYPOTHYROID DESCRIPTION

    Hypothyroidism occurs when the thyroid gland produces too little thyroid hormone, resulting in an underactive metabolic state. All of the body's processes slow down with this disorder. Thyroid hormones regulate your metabolism - how your body burns calories to produce energy - and influence all of your body processes, including heart rate, digestion, muscle and bone strength, and cholesterol levels.

    The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland located in the front of the neck, which produces thyroid hormones, or "chemical messengers," that signal cells throughout the body to increase oxygen use. The two key thyroid hormones are L-triiodothyronine (T3) - the more biologically active thyroid hormone - and thyroxine (T4).

    thyroid


    Hypothyroidism affects about 5 million people in the United States, about 90-percent of which are women. Thyroid problems can cause many recurring illnesses and fatigue.

    HYPOTHYROIDISM FACTS:
    • Hypothyroidism is present in 1 out of every 5000 newborns.
    • Impairment of thyroid function affects about 2-percent of adult women and about 0.1 to 0.2-percent of adult men in North America.
    • As many as 25-percent of patients with hypothyroidism have normal levels of T3.
    • Symptoms of thyroid dysfunction can have a significant impact on behavior such as mental confusion and memory problems.

    Hypothyroidism can be associated with depression and its symptoms:
    • Decreased interest in daily activities.
    • Concentration difficulties.
    • Sleep disturbances.
    • Reduced sexual interest.

    Hypothyroidism can be associated with certain heart problems and mild high blood pressure. Even mild thyroid failure can have harmful effects.





    HYPOTHYROID FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

    The symptoms of hypothyroidism are seen throughout the body. In adults, they usually develop slowly and are often considered part of the aging process. Symptoms of hypothyroidism in adults include:
    • Inability to tolerate cold temperatures.
    • Fatigue and feeling sluggish.
    • Loss of appetite.
    • Painful pre-menstrual periods.
    • Heavy or irregular menstrual periods that may last longer than 5 to 7 days.
    • Fertility problems.
    • Hair loss (including the eyebrows), coarse, dry, and thinning hair.
    • Weight gain.
    • Muscle weakness.
    • Muscle cramps and aches.
    • Slow body movements.
    • Slow heart rate.
    • A milky white discharge from the breasts.
    • Dry and scaly skin.
    • Brittle nails.
    • A yellow-orange coloration in the skin (particularly on the palms of the hands).
    • Goiter.
    • Yellow bumps on the eyelids.
    • Recurrent infections.
    • Constipation.
    • Depression.
    • Difficulty concentrating, memory problems.
    • Slow speech. Hoarseness.
    • Drooping, swollen eyes.
    • Facial puffiness.
    • Swelling of the arms, hands, legs, and feet.

    The most common symptoms are fatigue and intolerance to cold. If you consistently feel cold while others around you are hot, you may be suffering from reduced thyroid function.

    The progression of hypothyroidism depends on its cause and your age. Hypothyroidism caused by Hashimoto's thyroiditis occasionally will disappear on its own. More often, you will experience a gradual loss of thyroid function, although the symptoms may develop slowly and be so mild that they go unnoticed for years. The older you are, the more you will probably notice the symptoms. This condition is also called Hashimoto's disease or chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.

    HASHIMOTO'S DISEASE

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is the most common form of autoimmune thyroid disease. It develops when the body's natural defense system (immune system) makes antibodies that attack and eventually destroy the thyroid gland. This results in a gradual loss of thyroid tissue and thyroid gland function.

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is also associated with other conditions, including diabetes, Addison's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, pernicious anemia, and premature menopause.

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurs most often in women and older adults. The disease does not cause any pain and often goes unnoticed for years.

    Treatment may be needed if symptoms of low thyroid production (hypothyroidism) develop or if the thyroid gland becomes inflamed and enlarged. If the disease does not cause these problems, treatment may not be necessary.





    HYPOTHYROID CAUSES

    The thyroid gland is the body's internal thermostat. It regulates the temperature by secreting two hormones that control how quickly the body burns calories and uses energy. If the thyroid secrets too much hormone, hyperthyroidism results; too little hormone results in hypothyroidism. Many cases of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are believed to result from an abnormal immune response. The exact cause is not understood, but the immune system can produce antibodies that invade and attack the thyroid, disrupting hormone production.

    A condition called Hashimoto's disease is believed to be the most common cause of underactive thyroid. In this disorder, the body in effect becomes allergic to thyroid hormone. Hashimoto's thyroiditis develops when the immune system produces antibodies that destroy thyroid tissue and thus reduce the thyroid's ability to produce thyroid hormone. Hashimoto's disease is a common cause of goiter, a swelling of the thyroid gland, among adults.

    Other causes of hypothyroidism include the surgical removal of the thyroid gland and radioactive iodine therapy.
    • Thyroid Surgery. Part or all of the thyroid gland may be removed to treat disorders such as hyperthyroidism, an enlarged thyroid gland (goiter) that makes swallowing difficult, thyroid cancer, or thyroid nodules that may be overactive or cancerous. Hypothyroidism results when the thyroid gland is removed or when remaining thyroid tissue does not function properly.

    • Radioactive Iodine Therapy, which is often used to treat hyperthyroidism, and Hodgkin's disease. Radioactive iodine therapy can destroy the thyroid gland, leading to hypothyroidism.
    Less common causes of hypothyroidism include:
    • Infections. Viral and bacterial infections can temporarily damage the thyroid gland, resulting in a short-term form of the condition. Hypothyroidism caused by infection usually does not result in permanent hypothyroidism.

    • Medications. Some medications can interfere with normal production of thyroid hormone. Lithium carbonate, a medication used to treat people with bipolar disorder, is one of the most common medications that causes hypothyroidism. Others include amiodarone hydrochloride (such as Amiodarone, Cordarone, and Pacerone) and interferon-alfa (such as Infergen, Rebetron, and Wellferon).

    • Pituitary & Hypothalamus Disorders. Rarely, disorders of the pituitary gland or the hypothalamus (secondary and tertiary forms of hypothyroidism). The pituitary gland and hypothalamus produce hormones that control the thyroid and, as a result, affect its ability to produce thyroid hormone.

    • Excessive Iodine, which, in food or medications, can reduce the function of the thyroid gland (usually temporarily).

    • Congenital Hypothyroidism. About 1 in 4,000 infants is born without a properly functioning thyroid gland. All children born in a hospital in the United States are tested for hypothyroidism at birth.
    Mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism is most often caused by inadequate treatment of hypothyroidism, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, or radioactive iodine therapy. However, it may be caused by anything that causes hypothyroidism.

    Pregnancy, which requires an increased production of thyroid hormone, can cause hypothyroidism. About 3-percent of pregnant women in the United States develop hypothyroidism.

    Hyperthyroidism is not as common as hypothyroidism. Both of these thyroid disorders affect women more often than men. A malfunctioning thyroid can be the underlying cause of many recurring illnesses.

    RISK FACTORS

    Risk factors for hypothyroidism include:
    • Age. Older adults are more likely to develop hypothyroidism.
    • Female Gender. Women are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop hypothyroidism than men.
    • Family History. People who have close relatives with thyroid disorders are more likely to develop this condition.
    • Previous Thyroid Problems. Thyroid disease, goiter, and surgery or radiation therapy to treat thyroid problems increase the likelihood of developing hypothyroidism in the future.
    • Autoimmune Disease. Having an autoimmune disease, such as Addison's disease, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, or pernicious anemia. An autoimmune disease that causes patches of light skin (vitiligo), and premature gray hear (leukotrichia) are seen more often in people with hypothyroidism.
    • Iodine Deficiency. This is rare in the United States but common in areas where iodine is not added to salt, food, and water.
    • Medications. Some medications can interfere with normal thyroid function, particularly lithium carbonate (used to treat bipolar disorder), amiodarone hydrochloride (such as Amiodarone, Cordarone, and Pacerone), and interferon-alfa (such as Infergen, Rebetron, Wellferon).
    As many as 17-percent of women over age 60 are at risk for developing mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism. Many of the same factors that increase a person's risk for hypothyroidism also increase the risk for mild hypothyroidism.

    SUBCLINICAL HYPOTHYROIDISM

    Subclinical (mild) hypothyroidism is diagnosed though a medical history and physical exam. If your health professional suspects subclinical hypothyroidism based on findings from the history and physical exam, lab tests are done to confirm the diagnosis.

    Subclinical hypothyroidism is diagnosed when a person has:
    • No or mild symptoms of hypothyroidism (such as fatigue, cold intolerance, consistent weight gain, depression, or memory problems).
    • A mildly elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level.
    • A normal or only slightly decreased thyroxine (T4) level.
    Some people with subclinical hypothyroidism may test positive for antithyroid antibodies, which indicates they have Hashimoto's thyroiditis, a condition that may cause a gradual loss of thyroid gland function. Subclinical hypothyroidism affects 5 to 10-percent of men and 5 to 17-percent of women over the age of 60. About 5-percent of this group develop hypothyroidism per year. Subclinical hypothyroidism should be closely monitored.

    Current research does not provide clear evidence to support treatment of every person with subclinical hypothyroidism, and many health care providers disagree about whether it should be treated. When making the decision to treat subclinical hypothyroidism, the benefits of treatment (possible lowering of cholesterol levels and reduced symptoms) must be balanced with the cost of medication and monitoring.

    The progression of hypothyroidism depends on its cause and the age of the person.

    References: Hershman JM, Singh N (2002). Hypothyroidism. In RE Rakel, DT Bope, eds., Conn's Current Therapy, pp. 646-648. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders.

    HYPOTHYROIDISM IN ADULTS

    Hypothyroidism caused by Hashimoto's thyroiditis occasionally will disappear on its own. More often, the disorder causes a gradual loss of thyroid function, so your symptoms may develop slowly and be so mild that you do not notice them for years. However, symptoms usually grow worse, and health problems may develop as the disease progresses.

    If untreated, hypothyroidism may lead to:
    • Myxedema, a condition characterized by swelling of tissues, increased fluid around the heart and lungs, slowed muscle reflexes, and a slowed ability to think.

    • Myxedema coma, a rare, life-threatening condition. This can occur in a person who has had hypothyroidism for many years that becomes markedly worse. It usually occurs when older adults who have severe hypothyroidism become ill with another condition, suffer from cold exposure, or take pain killers or sleeping pills. A person with myxedema coma shows signs of mental deterioration, such as apathy, confusion, and psychosis. He or she may lose consciousness (coma) and may have an extremely low body temperature (hypothermia), slow heartbeat (fewer than 60 beats per minute), heart failure, and difficulty breathing (respiratory failure).
    Complications may occur, such as:
    • Increased levels of cholesterol and triglycerides (increasing the risk of coronary artery disease and stroke).
    • Fluid around the heart (pericardial effusion).
    • Sleep apnea.
    • Forgetfulness and dementia.
    People with mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism have only slightly abnormal thyroid hormone blood test results and often do not develop obvious symptoms or health problems seen in hypothyroidism. Some people with mild hypothyroidism regain normal thyroid function, but 5 to 20-percent of them develop hypothyroidism.

    If your thyroid gland has been removed during surgery, hypothyroidism will occur within a month. If you have been treated with radioactive iodine therapy, hypothyroidism often occurs within a year. In these cases, thyroid function generally will not return, and thyroid hormone medication must be taken for the rest of your life.

    HYPOTHYROIDISM DURING & AFTER PREGNANCY

    Women who have hypothyroidism or mild hypothyroidism before they become pregnant are more apt to develop more severe hypothyroidism during their pregnancy. If left untreated, pregnant women with hypothyroidism can develop high blood pressure (preeclampsia) and have a premature delivery. Children born to women with untreated hypothyroidism during pregnancy are at risk for having hypothyroidism at birth and may score lower on intelligence tests than children of healthy mothers.

    After delivery, women may develop a thyroid disorder called postpartum thyroiditis. This condition occurs in about 5-percent of women who do not have a history of thyroid disease. It is often confused with depression. Women with postpartum thyroiditis often first develop hyperthyroidism about 1 to 4 months after delivery. In the second phase of postpartum thyroiditis, which usually develops 4 to 8 months after delivery, these women develop hypothyroidism that usually lasts 2 to 8 weeks but may last up to 12 weeks. In about 25 to 50-percent of women with postpartum thyroiditis, permanent hypothyroidism develops. Even if thyroid gland function returns to normal, postpartum thyroiditis usually comes back during later pregnancies.

    HYPOTHYROIDISM IN INFANTS, CHILDREN, & TEENS

    Although rare, hypothyroidism is seen in infants and children. In infants, if hypothyroidism is treated within the first month of life, the child grows and develops normally. Untreated hypothyroidism in infants can cause brain damage, leading to mental retardation and developmental delays. Every state in the United States tests newborns for hypothyroidism.

    If hypothyroidism develops after age 3, mental retardation usually does not occur. However, untreated childhood hypothyroidism usually delays a child's physical growth and sexual development, including the onset of puberty.

    Teens with hypothyroidism typically look much younger than their age. With adequate treatment, the teen's height and weight will catch up to those of healthy teens of the same age.

    HYPOTHYROIDISM PREVENTION

    Hypothyroidism cannot be prevented.

    Since hypothyroidism cannot be prevented, you can watch for signs of the disease so it can be treated promptly. The American Thyroid Association recommends that all adults be tested beginning at age 35 and continuing every 5 years thereafter. Older adults, especially women older than 50, those with a strong family history of hypothyroidism, and those with Addison's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, pernicious anemia, and type 1 diabetes should also be tested.





    HYPOTHYROID CONVENTIONAL MEDICAL TREATMENT

    It is a common belief that hypothyroidism treatment is simple. Hypothyroidism is very often undiagnosed, misdiagnosed and undertreated. The truth is that hypothyroidism is a more complicated health condition than most people and health care practitioners think. Many patients are on the thyroid medication for years but still continue to experience multiple hypothyroid symptoms. The problem is that without a proper diagnosis your hypothyroidism treatment will not be effective.

    DIAGNOSTIC EXAMS & TESTS

    A thorough medical history and physical exam are the first steps in diagnosing hypothyroidism or mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism. If your health professional suspects hypothyroidism or subclinical hypothyroidism based on findings from the history and physical exam, lab tests are done to confirm the diagnosis.

    Blood tests are always used to confirm a diagnosis of hypothyroidism or mild hypothyroidism. The tests used most often include:

  • THYROID-STIMULATING HORMONE (TSH) ASSAY

  • Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH)

    TEST OVERVIEW: A test for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is often used to detect a problem affecting the thyroid gland. TSH is produced when the hypothalamus releases a substance called thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). Thyrotropin-releasing hormone then triggers the pituitary gland to release TSH. See an illustration of the thyroid gland and the pituitary gland. TSH causes the thyroid gland to produce two hormones: triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). T3 and T4 help control your body's metabolism. Triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) are needed for normal development of the brain, especially during the first 3 years of life. An infant whose thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone (congenital hypothyroidism) may, in severe cases, become mentally retarded. Older children also need thyroid hormones to grow and develop normally.

    A test for thyroid-stimulating hormone is done on a blood sample taken from a vein. This test may be done at the same time as tests to measure T3 and T4. For more information about T3 and T4 testing, see the medical test Thyroid Hormones Tests.

    A test for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is done to:
    • Determine if the thyroid gland is functioning properly. An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) can cause symptoms such as weight gain, tiredness, dry skin, constipation, a feeling of being too cold, or frequent menstrual periods. An overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) can cause symptoms such as weight loss, rapid heart rate, nervousness, diarrhea, a feeling of being too hot, or irregular menstrual periods.

    • Determine the cause of an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism). TSH levels can help determine whether hypothyroidism is due to damage of the thyroid gland itself or due to some other cause (such as a problem with the pituitary gland or the hypothalamus).

    • Monitor treatment with thyroid replacement medications for people who have an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism).

    • Monitor thyroid gland function in people who are being treated for an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism). This treatment may include antithyroid medications, surgery, or radiation therapy.

    • Confirm the diagnosis of an underactive thyroid gland in a newborn (congenital hypothyroidism).
    TEST PREPARATIONS: Inform your health care provider if you have recently (within 4 to 6 weeks) had any tests in which you were given radioactive materials or had X-rays that used iodine dye. Receiving iodine contrast material prior to a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test can affect with test results.

    TEST PROCEDURE: The health professional drawing blood will wrap an elastic band around your upper arm to temporarily stop the flow of blood through the veins in your arm. This makes it easier to put a needle into a vein properly because the veins below the band get larger and do not collapse easily. The needle site is cleaned with alcohol and the needle is inserted. More than one needle stick may be needed if the needle does not get placed correctly or if the vein cannot supply enough blood. When the needle is properly placed in the vein, a collection tube will be attached to the needle and blood will flow into it. Sometimes more than one tube of blood is collected. When enough blood has been collected, the band around your arm will be removed. A gauze pad or cotton ball is placed over the puncture site as the needle is withdrawn. Pressure is applied to the puncture site for several minutes and then a small bandage is often placed over it.

    You may feel nothing at all from the needle puncture, or you may feel a brief sting or pinch as the needle goes through the skin. Some people feel a stinging pain while the needle is in the vein. However, many people do not feel any pain (or have only minor discomfort) once the needle is positioned in the vein. The amount of pain you feel depends on the skill of the health professional drawing the blood, the condition of your veins, and your sensitivity to pain.

    TEST RISKS: There is very little risk of complications from having blood drawn from a vein. You may develop a small bruise at the puncture site. You can reduce the risk of bruising by keeping pressure on the site for several minutes after the needle is withdrawn. Rarely, the vein may become inflamed after the blood sample is taken. This condition is called phlebitis and is usually treated with a warm compress applied several times daily. Continued bleeding can be a problem for people with bleeding disorders. Aspirin, warfarin (Coumadin), and other blood-thinning medications can also make bleeding more likely. If you have bleeding or clotting problems, or if you take blood-thinning medication, tell the health professional before your blood is drawn.

    TEST RESULTS: Results of a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test are usually available within several days.

    Normal Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH)
    Newborns: 3 to 20 mIU/L
    Normal Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH)
    Adults: 0.4 to 5 mIU/L


    GREATER-THAN-NORMAL VALUES MAY MEAN:
    • A high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test result often indicates an underactive thyroid gland caused by failure of the thyroid gland (primary hypothyroidism). Hashimoto's thyroiditis is the most common cause of primary hypothyroidism.

    • Rarely, a high TSH value can occur from a pituitary gland tumor that is producing excess amounts of TSH. In this case, the person usually has symptoms of hyperthyroidism such as weight loss, rapid heart rate, nervousness, diarrhea, a feeling of being too hot, or irregular menstrual periods.

    • A high TSH value can also occur in people who have an underactive thyroid gland and are receiving too little thyroid hormone medication.
    LOWER-THAN-NORMAL VALUES MAY MEAN:
    • A low thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) value can indicate an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism). Causes of hyperthyroidism include Graves' disease, a type of goiter (multi-nodular goiter), or a non-cancerous (benign) tumor called a toxic nodule.

    • A low TSH value can also indicate damage to the pituitary gland that prevents it from producing TSH (secondary hypothyroidism). In this case, the person usually has symptoms of hypothyroidism such as weight gain, tiredness, dry skin, constipation, a feeling of being too cold, or frequent menstrual periods.

    • A low TSH value can occur in people who have an underactive thyroid gland and are receiving too much thyroid hormone medication.

    THINGS THAT CAN EFFECT TEST RESULTS:
    • Many medications can interfere with thyroid gland function test results, including corticosteroids, levodopa, dopamine, lithium (such as Eskalith, Lithonate, Cibalith-S), methimazole (Tapazole), and propylthiouracil.

    • Recently undergoing tests in which you were given radioactive materials or had X-rays that used iodine dye can affect thyroid-stimulating (TSH) results.

    • Severe stress or long-term (chronic) illness may interfere with test results.

    • TSH levels may be low during the first trimester of pregnancy.

    • Rough handling, contamination, or inadequate refrigeration of the blood sample can cause inaccurate test results.
    TEST CONSIDERATIONS: The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test is the best screening test for conditions that can affect the thyroid gland. The results of a TSH test should be considered along with the results of thyroid hormone tests, especially thyroxine (T4) results. Another test that measures TSH levels in the blood is called the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) challenge test. TSH blood levels are measured before and after an injection of TRH. Normally the injection causes the pituitary gland to release TSH. TSH levels that do not rise after the injection can indicate the presence of conditions such as a damaged pituitary gland (secondary hypothyroidism), Graves' disease, or any condition that causes an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism).


  • THYROXINE (T4) MEASUREMENT


  • Thyroid Hormone Test

    TEST OVERVIEW: The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland that lies in front of the windpipe (trachea), just below the voice box (larynx). The thyroid gland uses iodine from food to make two thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). The thyroid gland stores these thyroid hormones and releases them as they are needed. Thyroxine (T4) is produced by the thyroid gland when the pituitary gland releases thyroid-stimulating hormone (see above: Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone). Almost all of the triiodothyronine is made from thyroxine released by the thyroid gland, with only a small amount produced directly by the thyroid gland itself. T3 and T4 help control the body's metabolism. Special cells within the thyroid gland (called parafollicular cells, or "C" cells) also produce a hormone, calcitonin. Calcitonin may help to regulate use of calcium in the bones. Thyroid hormones are needed for normal development of the brain, especially during the first three years of life. An infant whose thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone (congenital hypothyroidism) may, in severe cases, become mentally retarded. Older children also need thyroid hormones to grow and develop normally.

    The most common blood tests to evaluate thyroid function are:
    • Thyroxine (T4). Most of the T4 in blood is attached to a protein (called thyroxine-binding globulin). Less than 1-percent of the T4 is unattached. This is called free T4 or FT4, and it affects metabolism.

    • Triiodothyronine (T3). T3 has a greater effect on metabolism than T4, even though T3 is normally present in lower amounts than T4. Most T3 is made from T4 by body tissues after T4 is released from the thyroid gland. The rest of the T3 is produced directly by the thyroid gland. The total amount of T3 in the blood or the amount of free T3 (FT3) can be measured. Normally, less than 1-percent of the T3 is free.

    • Triiodothyronine Uptake (T3U). The T3U test is an indirect measurement of the amount of the protein (thyroxine-binding globulin) that can bind to T3 and T4. The results of this test are useful only when evaluated along with other thyroid function tests.

    • Free Thyroxine Index (FTI or FT4). The FTI is a measure of the amount of T4 in relation to the amount of thyroxine-binding globulin present. The FTI is calculated from the T4 and T3U values. The FTI value can indicate when an abnormal level of T4 is due to an abnormal level of thyroxin-binding globulin in the blood.
    This test is done on a blood sample taken from a vein.

    Thyroid hormone tests are done to:
    • Determine whether the thyroid gland is functioning properly. An underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) can cause symptoms such as weight gain, tiredness, dry skin, constipation, a feeling of being too cold, or frequent menstrual periods. An overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) can cause symptoms such as weight loss, rapid heart rate, nervousness, diarrhea, a feeling of being too hot, or irregular menstrual periods.

    • Help evaluate an enlarged thyroid gland (goiter).

    • Screen newborns for underactive thyroid gland function, a condition called congenital hypothyroidism. This condition can interfere with normal growth and development and can cause other severe problems (such as mental retardation) if not discovered soon after birth.

    • Monitor the effects of treatment for thyroid disease (such as Graves' disease). The total thyroxine (T4), free thyroxine (FT4), and free thyroxine index (FTI) values are often used to monitor treatment for hyperthyroidism or to guide thyroid hormone replacement for hypothyroidism.
    PREPARING FOR THE TEST: No special preparation is required before having this test.

    The person drawing blood will wrap an elastic band around your upper arm to temporarily stop the flow of blood through the veins in your arm. This makes it easier to put a needle into a vein properly because the veins below the band get larger and do not collapse easily. The needle site is cleaned with alcohol and the needle is inserted. More than one needle stick may be needed if the needle does not get placed correctly or if the vein cannot supply enough blood. When the needle is properly placed in the vein, a collection tube will be attached to the needle. Blood will flow into the collection tube. Sometimes more than one tube of blood is collected. When enough blood has been collected, the band around your arm will be removed. A gauze pad or cotton ball is placed over the puncture site as the needle is withdrawn. Pressure is applied to the puncture site for several minutes and then a small bandage is often placed over it.

    You may feel nothing at all from the needle puncture, or you may feel a brief sting or pinch as the needle goes through the skin. Some people feel a stinging pain while the needle is in the vein. However, many people do not feel any pain (or have only minor discomfort) once the needle is positioned in the vein. The amount of pain you feel depends on the skill of the person drawing the blood, the condition of your veins, and your sensitivity to pain.

    TEST RISKS: There is very little risk of complications from having blood drawn from a vein. You may develop a small bruise at the puncture site. You can reduce the risk of bruising by keeping pressure on the site for several minutes after the needle is withdrawn. Rarely, the vein may become inflamed after the blood sample is taken. This condition is called phlebitis and is usually treated with a warm compress applied several times daily. Continued bleeding can be a problem for people with bleeding disorders. Aspirin, warfarin (Coumadin), and other blood-thinning medications can also make bleeding more likely. If you have bleeding or clotting problems, or if you take blood-thinning medication, tell the person before your blood is drawn.

    TEST RESULTS: Normal values may vary from lab to lab. Labs generally measure free T4 (FT4) levels, but may measure total thyroxine (T4) and T3 uptake (T3U) as well.

    THYROID HORMONE TESTS
       Total thyroxine (T4): 5 to 12 micrograms per deciliter (µg/dL)
       Free thyroxine (FT4): 0.9 to 2.4 nanograms per deciliter (ng/dL)
       Total triiodothyronine (T3): 70 to 195 ng/dL
       Free triiodothyronine (FT3): 0.2 to 0.6 ng/dL
       Free Thyroxine Index (FTI): 4 to 11

    Greater than normal values may mean: High values for these tests may indicate hyperthyroidism. This can be caused by Graves' disease, thyroiditis, a goiter that contains one or more abnormal growths (nodules), or from receiving too much thyroid hormone medication.

    Low values for these tests may indicate hypothyroidism. This can be caused by thyroid disease (such as thyroiditis), pituitary gland disease, or destruction of the thyroid gland by surgery or radiation.
       T3 uptake (T3U) - Normal: 24 to 34-percent

    The T3U value may be useful in interpreting the other thyroid hormone test results.

  • A higher-than-normal T4 value combined with a high T3U value usually confirms the presence of hyperthyroidism.
  • A higher-than-normal T4 value combined with a low T3U value often occurs during pregnancy or in women who take birth control pills.
  • A lower-than-normal T4 value combined with a low T3U value usually confirms the presence of hypothyroidism.
  • A lower-than-normal T4 value combined with an increased T3U value may indicate kidney disease or long-term (chronic) illness. This can also occur normally in some healthy individuals.


  • TEST RESULT INTERFERENCES: Many medications can interfere with thyroid function test results,including:
    • Corticosteroids and hormones such as estrogen, progesterone, and birth control pills.
    • Large doses of aspirin.
    • Warfarin (Coumadin), diphenylhydantoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (such as Tegretol), amiodarone (Cordarone), lithium (such as Eskalith, Lithonate), clofibrate (Atromid-S, Abitrate), phenytoin (Dilantin), heparin, propranolol (such as Corgard, Inderal, Tenormin), and phenylbutazone.
    • Contrast material used for certain X-ray imaging tests may affect T4 results.
    • Pregnancy can affect thyroid function tests results.
    • Rough handling, contamination, or inadequate refrigeration of the blood sample can cause inaccurate test results.


    OTHER BLOOD TESTS TO HELP EVALUATE THE THYROID GLAND INCLUDE:
    • Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Test. TSH is a hormone released by the pituitary gland that triggers the thyroid gland to produce thyroid hormones. A TSH test measures the amount of TSH in the blood and is considered the most reliable method of detecting a thyroid problem. For more information, see the medical test Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone.

    • Thyroid Antibodies Test. This test measures the presence of antibodies against thyroid tissue. If antibodies are detected, an autoimmune disease (such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease) that may cause the body to attack its own thyroid gland may be present.

    • Thyroxine-Binding Globulin (TBG) Test. TBG is an important protein in the blood that carries the thyroid hormones T3 and T4. TBG testing is rarely needed and is done only after more commonly used thyroid tests produce abnormal results.
    Problems with the thyroid gland can be further investigated by a thyroid scan, ultrasound, or biopsy.

    If the above tests are abnormal, the following test may be used to determine if a person has Hashimoto's thyroiditis:
    • Antithyroid Antibody Test: The immune system may produce antithyroid antibodies that destroy thyroid tissue. An antithyroid antibody test determines if these antibodies are present. If you test positive for antithyroid antibodies, you may have Hashimoto's thyroiditis, the most common cause of hypothyroidism. However, many people with hypothyroidism never test positive for antithyroid antibodies. Conversely, people who test positive for antithyroid antibodies may never develop hypothyroidism. Also, some people who test positive for antithyroid antibodies develop hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). The presence of antithyroid antibodies in a person with mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism can help predict how likely it is that a person will develop hypothyroidism that eventually causes symptoms.
    The following tests may be used to evaluate a thyroid gland that appears to be abnormal during physical exam:
    • Thyroid Ultrasound.
    • Thyroid Scan & Radioactive Iodine Uptake (RAIU) Test.
    A blood test, called the Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone (TRH) Stimulation Test, is sometimes used to diagnose other rare forms of hypothyroidism caused by diseases affecting the hypothalamus or the pituitary gland. A computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hypothalamus or pituitary gland may also be done to look for any changes in these areas of the brain.

    EARLY DETECTION: Because of the possibility of mental retardation in infants with ypothyroidism, every state in the United States tests newborns for hypothyroidism. If your baby was not born in a hospital, or if you believe your baby may not have been tested, talk to your health care provider. Screening tests for hypothyroidism are not always accurate. Watch your child for symptoms of hypothyroidism, even if test results are negative.

    Some health care providers now recommend routine testing for people at risk for hypothyroidism, including:
    • People age 35 and older. The American Thyroid Association guidelines recommend that screening begin at age 35 and continue every 5 years thereafter. Older adults, especially women older than 50, should be tested if they have never been tested.

    • People with a strong family history of hypothyroidism.

    • People with conditions associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, including Addison's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, pernicious anemia, and type 1 diabetes.

    • Pregnant women.

    • Pregnant women known to have hypothyroidism. Tests should be done at regular intervals to determine if the dosage of thyroid hormone medication is adequate.

    • Women who are having symptoms of hypothyroidism after pregnancy (postpartum hypothyroidism), such as depression, memory and concentration problems, or thyroid enlargement (goiter). Women who have had hypothyroidism during or after pregnancy should be retested if they become pregnant again.
    Screening is important for people who fall into the above groups because the signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism may not become apparent until the illness has become more advanced.

    hypothyroidism before and after treatment


    THYROID HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY

    The goals of thyroid hormone replacement therapy are to normalize thyroid hormone levels and to provide symptomatic relief. Although there are several types of thyroid hormone replacement available, not any one type is optimal therapy for everyone. As a result, treatment options may vary from person to person.

    Hypothyroidism can be easily treated using thyroid hormone medication. The most effective and reliable thyroid replacement hormone is man-made (synthetic).
    • If your hypothyroidism is caused by Hashimoto's thyroiditis, you most likely need treatment for the rest of your life. Occasionally, thyroid gland function returns on its own.
    • If your thyroid gland has been removed during surgery, or if you have been treated with radiation therapy, you usually need treatment for the rest of your life.
    • If your hypothyroidism is triggered by a serious illness or infection, thyroid function most likely will return to normal when you recover. To determine if thyroid function has returned to normal, thyroid hormone medication may be stopped for a short time. In most people, there is a brief period of hypothyroidism after medication is stopped. This occurs because there is often a delay in the body's signals that tell the thyroid to start working again.
    • If the thyroid can produce enough thyroid hormone on its own, treatment is no longer needed.
    • If hormone levels remain too low, thyroid hormone medication is restarted.
    • If you have mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism, you may not need treatment but should be watched for signs of worsening hypothyroidism. Current research does not provide clear evidence to support treatment, and many health care providers disagree about whether mild hypothyroidism should be treated. When making the decision to treat mild hypothyroidism, the benefits - possible lowering of cholesterol levels and improved symptoms - must be balanced with the cost of medication and monitoring.

    MYXEDEMA COMA

    Myxedema coma is a rare, life-threatening condition that requires immediate treatment. A person with myxedema coma usually needs to receive care in an intensive care unit (ICU). If the person is having trouble breathing, a machine called a ventilator may be used. The person should also be monitored for heart problems, including heart attack, and treated if necessary. Thyroid hormone is given intravenously (IV). Because myxedema coma is often caused by infection, antibiotics are given. The corticosteroid hydrocortisone may be given until it can be established that the adrenal glands are functioning adequately. Signs of improvement are a rise in body temperature, the ability to breathe without a machine, and mental alertness.

    PREGNANCY

    Treatment during pregnancy is especially important because hypothyroidism can harm the developing fetus. If a woman is found to have hypothyroidism during pregnancy, treatment should be started immediately. If she is known to have hypothyroidism before she becomes pregnant, her thyroid hormone levels need to be carefully monitored to determine whether the dosage of thyroid hormone medication needs to be adjusted. Women who develop hypothyroidism after pregnancy (postpartum hypothyroidism) also may need treatment. These women should to be retested for hypothyroidism if they become pregnant again. In some cases, hypothyroidism will go away on its own; in other cases, it is permanent and will need lifetime treatment.

    Infants and children with hypothyroidism should always be treated. An infant with hypothyroidism who is treated using an appropriate dose of replacement thyroid hormone within the first month of life will grow and develop normally. Without such treatment, significant mental retardation usually results. Treatment must be continued for life. Children who develop hypothyroidism will start growing normally again once they start receiving the correct dose of replacement thyroid hormone.

    CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT CONSIDERATIONS

    In most cases, symptoms of hypothyroidism start to improve within the first week after the therapy is begun. All symptoms usually disappear within a few months.

    Some people who take thyroid hormone medication develop symptoms of hyperthyroidism, such as nervousness, palpitations, insomnia, or tremors, if their dosage is too high. Conversely, if the thyroid hormone medication dosage is not adequate, some symptoms may continue (for example, feeling tired and cold, and memory problems).

    People who have other health conditions, particularly coronary artery disease, may sometimes develop problems if they are started on a large dose of thyroid hormone medication. These people are often started on a lower dose that is gradually increased over time.

    Older adults and people who are in poor health may take longer to respond to thyroid hormone medication. Lower doses of thyroid hormone may be needed.

    For some people, hypothyroidism is a progressive disease and the dosage of thyroid hormone medication may have to be increased gradually as the thyroid continues to slow down.

    Most people with hypothyroidism treated with thyroid hormone medications develop symptoms again if their medication is stopped. If this occurs, medication needs to be restarted.

    THYROID HORMONE MEDICATIONS

    Thyroid hormone medication is the only effective way to treat hypothyroidism. In most cases, thyroid hormone medication:
    • Reduces or eliminates symptoms of hypothyroidism. In most cases, symptoms of hypothyroidism start to improve within the first week after therapy is begun. All symptoms usually disappear within a few months.
    • May reduce the risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD) by decreasing levels of cholesterol and triglycerides.
    • May reduce the risk of slowed physical growth, mental retardation, and behavioral problems in infants and children.
    • Thyroid hormone medication does not cause side effects when the correct dose is being taken on a regular basis.

    MEDICATION CHOICES

    Hypothyroidism is treated with thyroid hormone medication, such as levothyroxine sodium (for example, Synthroid, Levoxyl, or Levothroid).

    MEDICATION CONSIDERATIONS

    People with hypothyroidism need treatment with thyroid hormone medication. Depending on the cause of their hypothyroidism, treatment may be needed for the rest of their lives.

    Taking calcium supplements and thyroid hormone medication at the same time may reduce the amount of thyroid hormone medication absorbed by the body. It is recommended that people take calcium supplements at least 4 hours before or after taking thyroid hormone medication to make sure they receive the full benefit of their medication.

    If you are using estrogen or hormone replacement therapy (ERT or HRT), take birth control pills, or are pregnant, you may need more thyroid hormone medication. If you have recently stopped ERT or HRT or taking birth control pills, you may need less thyroid hormone medication. Talk to your health care provider about the possible need to adjust your dosage.

    The dosage of thyroid hormone depends upon the severity of the condition, age and body size, and other medical conditions.

    People who have other health conditions in addition to hypothyroidism, particularly coronary artery disease, may sometimes develop problems if they are initially started on a large dose of thyroid hormone. These people are often started on a lower dose that is carefully increased over time.

    In older adults, too much thyroid hormone medication can cause the rate of bone loss to speed up (osteoporosis). Lower doses of the medication may be needed.

    Follow-up visits with your health care provider are important for monitoring treatment. The health care provider will ensure that the medication is being taken correctly and adjust the dose when necessary. Most people return to their health care providers for blood tests to measure thyroid hormone levels 6 to 8 weeks after starting therapy. After thyroid hormone levels have normalized, thyroid function tests are rechecked in 6 months and then once a year thereafter.

    Some people with mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism may prefer not to receive treatment. Such people should watch closely for any symptoms of hypothyroidism. Their health care providers will also usually want to do regular (yearly) thyroid function blood tests to check for worsening thyroid gland function.

    FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THYROID DISORDERS:

    American Thyroid Association
    6066 Leesburg Pike
    Suite 650
    Falls Church, VA 22041
    Phone: (703) 998-8890
    Fax: (703) 998-8893
    E-mail: admin@thyroid.org
    Web Address: http://www.thyroid.org

    The American Thyroid Association is a professional society of physicians and scientists. Its mission is to promote scientific and public understanding of the thyroid disorders. The association publishes a monthly journal and manages an informational Web site.

    National Health Information Center (NHIC)
    P.O. Box 1133
    Washington, DC 20013-1133
    Toll-Free Phone: 1-800-336-4797
    Phone: (301) 565-4167
    Fax: (301) 984-4256
    E-mail: info@nhic.org
    Web Address: http://www.health.gov/nhic/

    The National Health Information Center (NHIC) is a health information referral service. NHIC puts health professionals and consumers who have health questions in touch with those organizations that are best able to provide answers. It also distributes publications and directories on health promotion and disease prevention topics.

    The Thyroid Society for Education & Research
    7515 South Main Street
    Suite 545
    Houston, TX 77030
    Toll Free Phone: 1-800-THYROID (1-800-849-7643)
    Phone: (713) 799-9909
    E-mail: help@the-thyroid-society.org
    Web Address: http://the-thyroid-society.org/

    The mission of this national nonprofit organization is to pursue the prevention, treatment, and cure of thyroid disease. It provides information (including a book entitled Could It Be My Thyroid?) to both the general public and health professionals.

    BOOKS ABOUT THYROID DISORDERS

  • Could It Be My Thyroid? -- By Sheldon Rubenfeld MD, George H.W. Bush

  • Living Well With Hypothyroidism: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need To Know -- By Mary J. Shomon

  • The Thyroid Solution: A Mind-Body Program for Beating Depression and Regaining Your Emotional and Physical Health -- By Arem Ridha

  • Thyroid Power: Ten Steps to Total Health -- By Richard Shames, Karilee H. Shames

  • How I Reversed My Hashimoto's Thyroiditis Hypothyroidism -- By Robert T. Dirgo


  • HYPOTHYROID HOME TREATMENT

    If you have hypothyroidism, see your health professional on a regular basis so that your condition can be closely monitored and your treatment adjusted, if necessary. It is very important to take thyroid hormone medication correctly. Talk with your health professional if you do not understand the reason for taking medication regularly or if you think you have any side effects from the medication. You usually need to have regular blood tests to determine if you are receiving the correct amount of thyroid hormone.

    Children with hypothyroidism need to see a health professional on a regular basis because the amount of thyroid hormone medication they need changes as they grow. Untreated hypothyroidism in infants and very young children can have severe consequences. As soon as you think your child is old enough to share the responsibility for his or her own health care (usually around age 9 or 10), teach him or her about hypothyroidism, the importance of taking medication correctly, and why regular health checkups are important.

    Some health food stores in the United States sell "natural" forms of thyroid. The quality and effectiveness of these natural agents are unregulated. Some may not work at all. Others may have an active ingredient that does work but that may be dangerous to certain people. Be sure to read labels and obtain natural products through reliable sources.

    hypothyroid essential oil blend


    COMPLEMENTARY & ALTERNATIVE THERAPIES

    Alternative medicine has the same goal. Holistic methods also aim to increase the amount of thyroid hormone produced by the gland. However, alternative methods also target the immune system which is the underlying source of the problem.

    REVIVING YOUR THYROID

    By Joseph Debé, D.C., D.A.C.B.N., C.C.S.P., C.C.N.
    (Full Article: Reviving Your Thyroid!)


    There are many different factors that can contribute to hypothyroidism. These include: genetics, aging, stress, surgical or pharmaceutical treatment of hyperthyroidism, anorexia nervosa, fasting, malnutrition, nutrient insufficiencies, systemic illness, insulin resistance, inflammation, autoimmunity, physical trauma, smoking, radiation, iron-deficiency anemia, imbalance of other hormones including estrogen and progesterone, exposure to environmental pollutants and other toxins, some medications, inactivity, and even certain foods.

    Sluggish thyroid activity can result from impairment of any of a number of steps in thyroid hormone metabolism. These steps include: stimulation of the thyroid by TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) from the pituitary gland, accumulation of iodine within the thyroid gland; production of thyroid hormone; release of hormone from the thyroid gland into the blood; transport of thyroid hormone within the bloodstream; conversion of T4 to the more active thyroid hormone, T3; binding of thyroid hormone to cell receptors; transport of thyroid hormone into the cells (where it produces its activity); elimination of thyroid hormone from the body.

    Much of your thyroid rejuvenation program will need to be customized based on results of special laboratory tests. However, we feel that some recommendations apply to virtually all patients with an underactive thyroid. Because certain foods impair thyroid function, we suggest that you consume only small amounts of these until your thyroid is normalized. These foods include: cabbage, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, kale, cauliflower, maize, turnips, sweet potatoes, lima beans, bamboo shoots, mustard greens, onions, peanuts, pinenuts, walnuts, almonds, sorghum, cassava, millet, grapefruit and apples. Although many of these foods have a reputation for being health promoting, they can be counterproductive for the individual striving to boost a sluggish thyroid. Cooking these foods may minimize their negative effects. Other foods that should be limited include those foods rich in saturated fats (beef, lamb, pork, dairy, organ meats, processed coconut and palm oils); trans fatty acid-containing, partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (found in margarine and most processed foods); and refined carbohydrates (table sugar, candy, cookies, crackers, muffins, bagels, cakes, pasta, most cereals and breads).

    Eat mostly whole, unrefined foods the way nature provides them. For example, eat baked potatoes, rather than French-fries. Assure adequate protein intake. Eat liberal amounts of vegetables, legumes, fruits, nuts, seeds, fish and eggs. Consume smaller amounts of lean meats, poultry, dairy products, whole grains, whole grain breads and pastas. Cold water fish such as mackerel, salmon, and sardines should be consumed at least several times per week. Larger fish, such as tuna and swordfish, as well as shellfish and sea vegetables, often are contaminated with high levels of mercury, which can suppress thyroid function. Limit consumption of these foods, as well as fresh water fish, which are often contaminated with thyroid-suppressing PCBs. For those who will not eat fish, other options, in declining order of preference, are supplements of fish oil (available in capsule or powdered form), algal oil, or flaxseed oil. Choose "organic" produce and "free range" animal products whenever possible, in order to lower possible exposure to pollutants which poison thyroid metabolism.

    Further reduce pollution exposure by using a good quality water filter. A special filter to remove fluoride is required for those water supplies where fluoride is added. Chlorine and fluoride both substitute for iodine within molecules of thyroid hormone and alter its function. Not only is chlorine ingested in drinking water, it also enters the body through the skin and is inhaled in water vapor while showering. For those whose water supply has added chlorine, a shower filter to remove chlorine is also necessary. A whole house filter, to remove impurities in all the water supplied to your home, is something to consider.

    Several natural supplements are worthy of consideration by any person with hypothyroidism. Guggulsterone, a plant-derived (Guggul) Ayurvedic remedy, aids in the stimulation of thyroid function, weight loss, and lowering of elevated blood cholesterol and triglycerides (which often result from hypothyroidism). Supplements of mixed mineral Phosphates have been shown to prevent weight loss-induced drops in T3 levels. So, for those attempting to lose weight, mineral phosphates are a good choice. "Thyro-Stim" and "GTA" are nutritional products formulated to support thyroid function. Ask us if they are appropriate in your particular case. (They are not suitable for vegetarians). Supplemental Vitamin B-2 can help drive a cellular energy-producing chemical reaction that becomes sluggish in hypothyroidism. This can make a difference for those hypothyroid individuals not using thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Individuals whose hypothyroidism is autoimmune in origin (Hashimoto's Thyroiditis) may benefit from Arachidonic Acid, Colostrum, lactoferrin, and Whey. Additionally, Omega 3 Fatty Acids, Vitamin A and Vitamin D, all need to be ingested in adequate quantities. Cod Liver Oil can be used to supply all three of these. Supplements of Quercetin, P.A.B.A. and Melatonin should be used with caution, as these have the potential to suppress thyroid activity.

    Melatonin is a hormone produced by the body. Its production increases in response to darkness. That is one of the reasons people tend to gain more weight in the winter. To guard against melatonin suppressing your thyroid function, make sure to get regular exposure to sunlight (a good fifteen minutes a day). When this is not possible, an option is to sit within six feet of a special 10,000-lux lamp for half an hour or more on a daily basis.

    Exercise stimulates thyroid hormone secretion and improves tissue sensitivity to the hormone. Regular exercise needs to be a part of your program. It is important to realize that weight loss programs that do not incorporate exercise can result in blunting of thyroid activity and excessive loss of healthy lean body tissue. Ideally, exercise should include muscle strengthening, stretching, and cardio-respiratory conditioning. If exercise is something new for you, ask us for some help in getting started on a regular program.

    LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF HYPOTHYROIDISM

    Hopefully, by now, you are gaining an appreciation for the fact that the thyroid is not an isolated gland, functioning autonomously, without connection to other parts of the body. To get a better feel for just how complex thyroid metabolism (and metabolism in general) is, let's take a look at the influence of a single compound on thyroid function.

    Reduced Glutathione is a tripeptide (composed of three amino acids), produced by the body, which plays a role in the conversion of T4 to T3. Low levels of reduced glutathione can result in impaired thyroid function. Now take a look at all the things that can result in inadequate levels of reduced glutathione in the body: deficiencies of Vitamin B-2, Vitamin B-3, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Alpha-Lipoic Acid, and good quality Protein; toxins from diverse sources such as medications (including acetaminophen), environmental pollutants, and heavy metals (lead, mercury, etc.); oxidative stress (imbalance of free radicals in relation to antioxidants); heavy alcohol consumption; and insulin resistance. These influences on levels of reduced glutathione are, in turn, affected by other factors such as: genetics, aging, inactivity, nutrient deficiencies, smoking, infection, inflammation, impaired detoxication, poor dietary choices, stress, suboptimal digestion and absorption function. Sound complex? It is. That is why we need to take a holistic approach and leave no stone unturned in our quest to normalize your thyroid and improve your health in general.

    Many nutrients are required for proper thyroid function. Insufficiencies of any of these could result in impaired thyroid metabolism. These include: Iodine, Selenium, Cobalt, Zinc, Rubidium, Copper, reduced Glutathione, L-Tyrosine, and Vitamin A, Vitamin B-2, Vitamin B-3, Vitamin B-6, Vitamin C, Vitamin D and Vitamin E. Although we advocate testing for deficiencies of these nutrients, an alternate approach is to simply take them all in supplemental form. You may find a thyroid support supplement containing a formula which contains many of these compounds. Computerized dietary analysis can be used to identify suboptimal dietary intake of any of these nutrients. More accurate evaluation, however, involves analysis of blood and hair samples to assess your status of these nutrients. Hair analysis provides other important information, including the presence of toxic heavy metals that can impair thyroid function. The results of these tests lead to tailored nutritional supplementation.

    The Comprehensive Digestive Stool Analysis is another important test for the hypothyroid individual. This test involves analysis of a stool specimen for two dozen different compounds. You may be eating the proper foods and consuming the right nutrients, but if you have suboptimal digestion or absorption, your body, including the thyroid, will suffer. The Comprehensive Digestive Stool Analysis gives a good indication as to your body's ability to digest and absorb food. This test gives additional information that can have a bearing on thyroid function, including the make-up of the different species of bacteria and yeast inhabiting your intestinal tract. Certain bacteria, parasites and yeast can provoke an inflammatory response by the body that can result in reduced thyroid function. Additionally, The body's immune system can sometimes produce antibodies against yeast, which cross-react with the thyroid gland. This results in autoimmune hypothyroidism. Incidentally, the environmental pollutants PBBs and PCBs, the grain protein gluten, as well as anti-psychotic medications like phenothiazines, have also been implicated in autoimmune hypothyroidism. However, even without evoking an immune response, waste products from toxic organisms in the intestinal tract pass into the bloodstream and can poison various biochemical reactions and suppress thyroid metabolism. What's more, abnormal intestinal flora, vegetarian diets, and rapid transit time (speed at which food passes through the gastrointestinal tract) can all contribute to reduced enterohepatic circulation of thyroid hormones. Enterohepatic circulation can be simply viewed as a way the body conserves thyroid hormones. Treatment to improve digestion, absorption, and bowel ecology is customized from results of the Comprehensive Digestive Stool Analysis.

    Obviously, toxicity is a potential contributor to hypothyroidism. We therefore advocate revaluation of the body's ability to detoxify itself. The liver is the main organ of detoxication and the site of greatest production of T3. The test we use to assess the body's detoxication capacity is The Comprehensive Detoxification Profile. This test involves analysis of saliva, urine, and blood specimens after "challenging" the body to detoxify caffeine, Tylenol, and aspirin. The Comprehensive Detoxification Profile gives detailed information about the body's ability to process toxins, its current load of toxins and free radicals, and the status of its antioxidant defense system. Results from this test allow for recommendation of specific nutrients and foods to improve detoxication.

    In fact, one of the most important therapies for improving thyroid function, and health in general, is an individually tailored metabolic detoxification program. Many people think of detoxification as simply colon cleansing. Metabolic detoxification is far more comprehensive. It involves use of food, scientifically proven detoxification supplements, and other natural therapies to help the body process and eliminate toxins from every cell, tissue and organ, not just the intestines. Metabolic detoxification is the single most powerful therapy we have. It often produces a significant reduction in chronic symptoms in a matter of weeks. We strongly encourage you to allow us to coach you through a metabolic detoxification program in order to rid the body of thyroid-suppressing toxins. Metabolic detoxification is an excellent way to start a weight loss program, as the loss of body fat liberates stored toxins and introduces them into circulation. Without proper detoxication, these toxins can produce damage throughout the body, including the thyroid.

    Another test we recommend for our hypothyroid patients is The Adrenal Stress Index. This test involves analysis of saliva samples for levels of the stress hormones, cortisol and DHEA. Cortisol and DHEA are largely antagonistic to each other, and must be in proper balance for good health. Prolonged stress results in elevation of cortisol and suppression of DHEA. This causes breakdown throughout the body. High cortisol to DHEA ratios suppress TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) levels. TSH, produced by the pituitary gland, which is located at the base of the brain, stimulates the thyroid to manufacture and release thyroid hormones. Therefore, suppression of TSH results in lower thyroid activity. Elevated cortisol to DHEA levels also impair the conversion of T4 to T3. The body makes less T3 and more reverse (r) T3 in response to high cortisol to DHEA ratios. Reverse T3 is slightly different in structure from T3 and does not appropriately bind to receptor sites, as does T3. The rT3 blocks T3 from binding to receptor sites and exerting biologic activity, and fails to exert thyroid action of its own. The result is a slowing of metabolism. It is important to realize that the stress that can cause cortisol-DHEA imbalance is not only mental-emotional strain. These hormones also become altered by: excessive levels of sound and light, certain chemicals, fatigue, starvation, acute illness, pain, tissue injury, trauma, surgery, long airplane flights, heat, cold, and rapid fluctuations in blood sugar levels. The three most common stressors appear to be mental-emotional, tissue injury, and rapid fluctuations in blood sugar levels. The results of The Adrenal Stress Index test reveal whether imbalance of cortisol and DHEA may be impacting your health. The exact nature of abnormal values leads us to appropriate therapies to restore a normal stress response and, thus, "unstress" the thyroid.

    Laboratory blood tests that identify inflammation are also important. These include SED rate, C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, basophil cell count, and cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF). Inflammation is another cause of low thyroid function. When present, the cause of the inflammation needs to be sought and dealt with appropriately. Common causes are infection, food antigens, nutritional imbalances, stress and toxicity.

    Other tests may be indicated in any given case of hypothyroidism. For example, some women may have suppressed thyroid function due in part to elevated estrogen and/or low progesterone levels. These hormones are best evaluated with a "Female Hormone Panel". This is a laboratory test that measures these hormones from saliva samples. The results lead to customized treatment. However, to summarize, our general work-up for most individuals with hypothyroidism includes:
      1. Testing of blood samples for vitamin deficiencies.
      2. Hair Mineral Analysis
      3. Comprehensive Digestive Stool Analysis
      4. Comprehensive Detoxification Profile
      5. Adrenal Stress Index
      6. Tests to identify inflammation

    Results of these tests lead to customized treatment, which can correct the underlying causes of your slow metabolism. Please do not get stressed out over the complexity of this program. We are here to help you through it, step by step.

    THYROID SUPPRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS

    As you read this list, think carefully about any possible exposure to these chemicals, past or present. You can contact Dr. Debé, a board certified nutritionist, or other nutritionist in your area specializing in hypothyroidism, if you think there is even a remote chance of any exposure (excluding food sources) and/or if you have questions.

    (Most of the following information on sources of chemicals and medications comes from The Merck Index, Twelfth Edition, 1996)
    • Methimazole and Carbimazole - used in silver electroplating; also used as antihyperthyroid medicine.
    • Goitrin - found in cruciferous vegetables.
    • Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) - insecticide still in wide use in other countries; absorbed by ingestion, through the skin, and by inhalation.
    • Resorcinol - may be present in community water supplies, particularly in coal-rich areas of the world; used in tanning, resin adhesives, dyes, explosives, cosmetics, dyeing and printing textiles. Present in cigarette smoke.
    • Pyridines - found in coal and in cigarette smoke.
    • Phthalate esters and phthalaitic acids and their metabolites- found naturally in plants, fungal metabolites, shale, crude oil, and petroleum; common industrial water pollutants; used in varnishes and perfumes. As compounds that impart flexibility to plastics (comprising up to 40-percent of the weight of plastic), polyvinylchloride polymers (PVC) are widely used, including: in building and construction, home furnishings, cars, clothing and food wrappings. The thyroid-suppressing effect of these compounds results when they are chemically modified by certain types of bacteria (Gram-negative) which may contaminate drinking water or inhabit your intestinal tract!
    • Thiocyanate -found in brassica vegetables and cigarette smoke.
    • Fisetin, Kaemferol, Naringenin, and Quercetin- among the most potent of the thyroid - suppressing flavonoids, found in plants. Onions are a rich source of quercetin, grapefruits contain naringenin.
    • P-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) - used in sunscreens; a B vitamin co-factor.
    • Lithium - found in food; used in the production of alloys for aircrafts and aerospace; used in the plastics industry, ceramics, electrochemical cells, batteries, lubricating greases.
    • Excess dietary iodine - found in commercial iodized salt, baked goods, seafood.
    • Nabam - agricultural fungicide.
    • Zineb - agricultural fungicide.
    • Ziram - agricultural fungicide; rubber vulcanization accelerator.
    • Aromatic Amines - fungicide, emulsifier, soil stabilizer.
    • Barbituric Acid - used in manufacture of plastics, pharmaceuticals.
    • Ethylene thiourea - accelerator in synthetic rubber production.
    • Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) - once widely used industrial chemicals whose high stability contributed to long term deleterious environmental and health effects. Airborne PCBs accumulate in foliage. Used in electrical capacitors, electrical transformers, gas transmission turbines, vacuum pumps. Formerly used in the U.S. as hydraulic fluids, plasticizers, adhesives, fire retardants, wax extenders, dedusting agents, pesticide extenders, inks, lubricants, cutting oils, in heat transfer systems, carbonless reproducing paper.
    • Uracil - used in biochemical research.
    • Amphenone - used in biological research.
    • Meta-aminophenol - dye intermediate.
    • 3-Methylcholanthrene - used in cancer research.
    • Phloroglucinol - used in chemistry, printing, and textile dyeing.
    • Rotenone - insecticide.
    • 2,4-dinitrophenol - insecticide; herbicide; fungicide; wood preservative; used in the manufacture of dyes.
    • Quinone - used in the manufacture of dyes; in photography; tanning hides.
    • Perchlorate - salts for explosives and for plating of metals.
    • Thiourea - used in manufacture of resins; photographic fixing agent; used to remove stains from negatives.
    • Pentachlorophenol - wood and leather preservative. Found in the urine of 71% of Americans in a random sample.
    • Fluoride - added to some water supplies (all of New York City), and toothpaste.
    • Chlorine - added to most water supplies, including all of New York City.

    MEDICATIONS KNOWN TO IMPAIR THYROID FUNCTION

    The following list shows first, the class of medication. In most cases this is followed by additional information: the chemical name of the medication and then the brand names. You can contact your nutritionist if you have used any of these medications and/or you have any questions.
    • Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs
    • Antiarrhythmic - Amiodarone - Amiordar, Ancoron, Angiodarona, Attansil, Cordarex, Cordarone, Cordarone X, Miocard, Miodacon, Ortacrone, Ritmocardyl, Rythmarone, Trangorex.
      - Propranolol - Inderal
    • Antianginal - Amiodarone (see above) and 2-Thiouracil
    • Antihypertensive - Propranolol - Inderal
    • Tranquilizer - Chloropromazine - Thorazine
    • Antimalarial - Chloroquine - Arechin, Avloclor, Imagon, Malaquin, Resochin, Tresochin.
    • Antiamebic - Chloroquine (see above).
    • Antirheumatic - Chloroquine (see above).
    • Lupus Erythematosus suppressant - Chloroquine (see above).
    • Antibacterial - P-Aminosalicylic Acid - Aminocil, Aminopar, Bactylan, Entepas, Gabbropas, Osacyl, Pamisyl Sodium, Paracipan, Paramisan Sodium, Pasid, Pasara Sodium, Pasmed Sodium, Salvis.
    • Antibacterial - Sulfadiazine - Adiazine, Diazyl, Sulfolex.
      - Sulfathiazole - Thiazamide, Cibazol, Duatok, Enterobiocine, Sulfamul, Sulfavitina, Sulzol.
    • Tuberculostatic - P-Aminosalicylic Acid (see above).
    • Antidepressants - Amitriptyline - Flavil
      - Clomipramine - Anafranil
      • Doxepin - Adapin, Sinequan
      • Imipramine - Tofranil
      • Trimipramine - Surmontil
      • Amoxapine - Asendin
      • Desipramine - Norpramin, Pertrofrane
      • Maprotiline - Ludiomil
      • Nortriptyline - Pamelor
      • Protriptyline - Vivactil

    • Antihelmintic - 4-Hexylresorcinol - Ascaryl, Caprokol, Crystoids, Gelovermin, Sucrets, Worm-Agen.
    • Topical Antiseptic - 4-Hexylresorcinol (see above).
    • Topical Antiseptic - Substituted phenols
    • Kerotolytic - Resorcinol
    • Antiseborrheic - Resorcinol
    • Antihyperthyroid - Methimazole - Carbimazole - Thiouracil - Aminothiazole - Propylthiouracil
    • Analgesic - Antipyrine - Analgesine, Anodynine, Parodyne, Phenylone, Sedatine.
      - Methadone
    • Antispasmodic - Phloroglucinol
    • Sedative - Amobarbital - Somnal, Dormytal, Isomytal, Eunoctal, Amal, Mylodorm, Sednotic, Amasust, Stadadorm, Amytal.
    • Hypnotic - Amobarbital (see above)
    • Antifungal - Oligomycin
    • Anticoagulant - Dicumarol - Dicoumarol, Dicoumarin, Dicumol, Dufalone, Melitoxin.
    • Glucocorticoids - Betamethasone - Celestone Soluspan
      - Cortisone Acetate - Cortone Acetate
      - Dexamethasone - Dalalone D.P., Decadron
      - Prednisolone - Hydeltrasol, Hydeltra-T.B.A., Pediapred, Prelone
      - Hydrocortisone - Hydrocortone
    • Antihypotensive - Dopamine - Intropin, Dopastat
    • Cardiotonic - Ouabain
    • Topical Anti Pruritic - Substituted phenols
    • Ultraviolet Screen - P-Aminobenzoic Acid (PABA) - Amben, Paraminol, Sunbrella. Ingredient in Pobanol, Presun.
    • Topical Anesthetic - Substituted phenols
    • Congestive Heart Failure Medication - 2-Thiouracil
    • Radiocontrast Agents
    • Interferon-a - used in cases of hepatitis C and some cancers
    • Estrogen (oral, not vaginal or transdermal) - Premarin and others
    • Cholesterol-Lowering - Clofibrate
    • Anti-Cancer - 5-fluorouraci - Efudex - Tamoxifen - Nolvadex
    • Anticonvusant - Phenytoin - Dilantin - Carbamazepine - Tegretol


    Sufficient rest to help promote health and healing.

    Laughter, every time you laugh or smile, your immune system cells show changes that are beneficial to immune system health. Dr. Norman Cousins reversed his own autoimmune disorder with a combination of humor and biofeedback.

    Allow your pets to heal you and give you pleasure.

    HYPOTHYROID ARTICLES

    Interesting articles about Hypothyroidism, Hypothyroid Hormone Tests, and Thyroxine Resistance. A "must read" for people having problems with hypothyroidism, inaccurate test results, and medication issues.

  • Holistic Health Topics: Hypothyroidism
  • Thyroid Disorders and Alternative Therapies
  • Alternative Medicine Approaches for Hypothyroidism
  • Alternative Medicine and Natural Hormone Approaches for Hypothyroidism
  • Recommendations for Healthy Thyroid Function
  • Alternative Medicine: Reviving the Thyroid
  • Diagnosis: Hypothyroidism - Answers to Some Common Questions
  • Savvy Patients - Hypothyroidism

  • CONSIDERATIONS

  • Because sugar intolerance, menopause, and depression can cause many of the same symptoms of thyroid disorder, a simple thyroid test should be considered to rule out any errors in diagnosis.


  • THYROID TEST PRODUCTS

  • Amazon: At Home Thyroid Test Kits


  • THYROID SELF-TEST

    To test yourself for an underactive thyroid, keep a thermometer by your bed at night. When you awaken in the morning, place the thermometer under your arm and hold there for 15 minutes. Keep still and quiet. Any motion can upset your temperature reading. A temperature of 97.6°F or lower may indicate an underactive thyroid. Keep a temperature log for five days. If your readings are consistently low, consult with your health care provider.

  • Treatment for a regular morning temperature of 96°F is 3 to 4 grains of Armour Thyroid Tablets daily (available by prescription). A person with a regular morning temperature of 97°F should take 1 to 2 grains. If you have side effects, speak to your health care provider about reducing the dosage.

  • Synthroid and Levothroid are synthetic versions of T-4 that are most frequently prescribed by health care providers for people with hypothyroidism. Some side effects of these medications include headache, irritability, nervousness, loss of sleep, diarrhea, weight loss, and changes in appetite. If a person shows no response to this medication, the health care provider may prescribe liothyronine (Cytomel). It contains T-3, which is needed to regulate metabolism.

  • A study done at the University of Massachusetts revealed that levothyroxine (Synthroid and others), a drug commonly used to treat thyroid conditions, can cause a loss of as much as 13 percent of bone mass. An estimated 19 million people in the United States take this drug for enlarged thyroid or thyroid cancer.

  • The conventional treatment for Hashimoto's disease is usually a prescription of a thyroid hormone that must be taken for the duration of one's lifetime.

  • The presence of too much thyroid hormone in the system can cause a condition known as a thyroid storm. The heart rate increases rapidly and, in exceptionally severe cases, a heart attack can occur.

  • Recent evidence indicates that an underactive thyroid may put you at an increased risk of heart attack - if your thyroid is only slightly underactive.

  • Lithium, a trace mineral used as a drug to treat manic-depressive disorders, can sometimes cause thyroid malfunction.

  • Wilson's Syndrome is a condition that results from a problem in the conversion of one thyroid hormone, thyroxine (T4), to another thyroid hormone, triiodothyromine (T3). This causes symptoms of decreased thyroid function, especially triggered by significant physical or emotional stress. These symptoms can be debilitating, and may persist even after the stress has passed. People with Wilson's syndrome have many of the symptoms of hypothyroidism, including low body temperature, fatigue, headaches, menstrual dysfunction, memory loss, loss of concentration, loss of sex drive, anxiety and panic attacks, depression, insomnia, intolerances to cold, and lack of energy and motivation. Their blood test results are often normal, however. For more information on Wilson's syndrome or to obtain the highly recommended Wilson's Syndrome Doctor's Manual, call the Wilson's Syndrome Foundation at 800-621-7006. Wilson Syndrome: An answer to the American Thyroid Association position.





  • HERBAL RECOMMENDATIONS

    Herbs may be used as dried extracts (capsules, powders, teas), glycerites (glycerine extracts), or tinctures (alcohol extracts). Unless otherwise indicated, teas should be made with 1 teaspoon herb per cup of hot water. Steep covered 5 to 10 minutes for leaf or flowers, and 10 to 20 minutes for roots. Drink 2 to 4 cups per day.

  • Bayberry Bark, Black Cohosh, and Goldenseal can help this thyroid condition. Caution: Do not take Goldenseal internally on a daily basis for more than one week at a time, do not use it during pregnancy, and use it with caution if you are allergic to ragweed.

  • This combination supports thyroid function: Combine equal parts of the following herbs for a tea (3 to 4 cups per day) or tincture (20 to 30 drops three times per day).
  • Kelp (Laminaria hyperborea), Bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus), and Irish Moss (Chondrus crispus) may be taken as foods or in capsule form.
  • Coleus foreskohlii (1 to 2 ml three times a day) stimulates thyroid function with an increase in thyroid hormone production. Also, herbs such as Guggul (Commiphora mikul) (25 mg of guggulsterones three times a day) and Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) (500 mg twice a day) are taken to counteract high cholesterol, which often accompanies hypothyroidism.

  • Gentian and Mugwort extracts are helpful for hypothyroidism.

  • Agar Agar, a kelp supplement, is a gelatinous substance obtained from several varieties of seaweed and used as a bulk laxative and as a treatment for hyperthyroidism.

  • Bayberry is used to improve circulation, promote perspiration, boost your immune system naturally, and ward off infections.

  • Black Cohosh is the most popular herbal supplement in Europe for women experiencing change of life (peri-menopausal symptoms).

  • Bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus) is a natural her for weight loss. Bladderwrack is a natural source of minerals and is guaranteed to contain 0.06-percent iodine. Bladderwrack has proved most useful in the treatment of underactive thyroid glands and goiter. Through the regulation of thyroid function there is an improvement in all the associated symptoms. Where obesity is associated with thyroid trouble, this herb may be very helpful in reducing the excess weight.

  • Goldenseal (hydrastis canadensis), a perennial wild native American herb, is also called Yellow Root. Native Americans used Goldenseal both internally and externally and also derived a dye from the root. Goldenseal is a very important traditional herb often used to as an immune support herb to fight infections.

  • Kelp Seaweed (Norwegian) has been proven in overwhelming research results as an effective treatment for thyroid dysfunction. Kelp contains a natural food based form of iodine, necessary for proper thyroid function. Norwegian Kelp seaweed contains nearly thirty minerals which nourish the glands, especially the thyroid and pituitary. Kelp, also known as seaweed, grows in the rich ocean beds, far below surface pollution levels.

  • Organic Coconut Oil is a high grade, virgin unrefined premium nutritional edible oil obtained from the first cold pressing of organic coconut (Cocos nucifera) kernels. Pure Virgin Coconut Oil Cream can be used in recipes as it is food grade, but also as an excellent hair and skin treatment.

  • Herbal Bitters such as Swedish Bitters may help alleviate the symptoms associated with thyroid malfunctions.

  • HERBAL & ALTERNATIVE THERAPY LINKS

  • HerbChina2000.com - Herbal Therapies - Hypothyroidism
  • HealthWorldOnline - Herbal Medicine - Hypothyroidism
  • Health & Age: Hypothyroidism
  • HealthWorldOnline - The Diagnosis And Treatment of Hypothyroidism
  • Hypothyroidism Research: Alternative/Complementary Therapies - Acupuncture & Traditional Chinese Medicine
  • Alternative Medicine Approaches for Hypothyroidism
  • The Yin and Yang of the Thyroid: A Look at Traditional Chinese Medicine
  • A Look at South American Medicinal Herbs & Hormonal Health
  • Thyroid Disease Information Source - Articles





  • DIET & NUTRITION RECOMMENDATIONS

  • Include in the diet Molasses, Egg Yolks, Parsley, Apricots, Dates, and Prunes, Raw Seeds, and Whole Grains. Eat Fish or Chicken and raw Milk and Cheeses.

  • Eat these foods in moderation: Brussels Sprouts, Peaches, Pears, Spinach, Turnips, and cruciferous vegetables such as Cabbage, Broccoli, Kale, and Mustard Greens. If you have severe symptoms, omit these foods entirely. They may further suppress thyroid function.

  • Avoid processed and refined foods, including white flour and sugar.

  • Drink quality water or steam-distilled water (preferred if possible). Avoid chlorinated water and water with heavy metal contamination.

  • Iodine is one of the most vital of the biochemical elements and has one of the highest vibratory frequency rates of all the elements. Potassium Iodide (KI) is a compound that contains Iodine, a nutrient necessary for normal thyroid function. Iodine in the form of Iodide is an integral part of thyroid hormones, which regulate cellular metabolism and energy production.

  • Tyrosine is an essential amino acid and a precursor of the neurotransmitters dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine (adrenaline) and the thyroid hormones. L-Tyrosine is used to treat insomnia, improve muscle tone, improve skin and hair pigment and depression and anxiety. L-Tyrosine should not to be used while taking prescription antidepressants or MAO inhibitors. L-Tyrosine is a non-essential amino acid that plays an important role in the production of the neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine. In addition, because L-Tyrosine is necessary for the synthesis of thyroid hormone and epinephrine (adrenaline), L-Tyrosine supports healthy glandular function and stress response.

  • Multi-Vitamin Without Iron contains vitamins and minerals that play many important roles in the body, such as antioxidants to protect fats, cells and DNA, coenzyme precursors for energy production and metabolism, and cofactors for hormones and enzymes which regulate body processes.

  • Organic Thyroid Glandulars supports the thyroid gland and the glands associated with thyroid function.

  • Thyroid Support Formula supplements are custom combination of vitamins, amino acids, trace minerals and standardized herbal extracts formulated to support healthy thyroid gland function. Different formulas contain a variety of ingredients and doses. Read labels carefully to find one that works for you.

  • Zinc moves through all the fluids in the body, it creates a defense against infection-causing bacteria and viruses trying to enter the body and stops bacterial and viral replication.

  • Taking the homeopathic remedy Calcarea Carbonica may help. It can sometimes increase thyroid function.

  • Do not take sulfa drugs or antihistamines unless specifically directed to do so by a health care provider.

  • Avoid fluoride (including that found in toothpaste and tap water) and chlorine (also found in tap water). Chlorine, fluoride, and iodine are chemically related. Chlorine and fluoride block iodine receptors in the thyroid gland, resulting in reduced iodine-containing hormone production and finally in hypothyroidism.

  • hypothyroid diet plan





    NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS

    The following nutrients are important for healing once appropriate local treatment has been administered. Unless otherwise specified, the following recommended doses are for adults over the age of 18. For children between the ages of 12 and 17, reduce the dose to 3/4 the recommended amount. For children between the ages of 6 and 12 years old, reduce the dose to 1/2 the recommended amount. For children under 6 years old, use 1/4 the recommended amount.

    NUTRIENTS
    Supplement
    Suggested Dosage
    Comments
    Essential
    Kelp
    2,000 to 3,000 mg daily. Contains natural iodine, the basic substance of thyroid hormone.

  • Kelp Herbal Supplement Products
  • L-Tyrosine
    500 mg twice daily, on an empty stomach. Take with water or juice. Do not take with milk. Take with 50 mg Vitamin B-6 and 100 mg Vitamin C for better absorption. Low plasma levels have been associated with hypothyroidism.

  • Tyrosine Supplement Products
  • Vitamin B-6 Supplement Products
  • Vitamin C Supplement Products
  • Very Important
    Multi-Glandular
    As directed on label. A nutritional supplement for the endocrine, hormonal, and enzyme systems.

  • Multiple Complex Glandular Supplement Products
  • Raw Thyroid Glandular
    As prescribed by a health care provider. To replace deficient thyroid hormone. Natural thyroid extract such as Armour Thyroid Tablets is best. (Available by prescription only.) See Glandular Therapy for more information.

  • Thyroid Glandular Supplement Products
  • Important
    Vitamin B-Complex
    100 mg three times daily, with meals. Amounts of individual vitamins in a complex will vary. B-vitamins work best when taken together. Needed for thyroid function. B Vitamins improve cellular oxygenation and energy. They are needed for proper digestion, immune function, red blood cell formation, and all bodily enzyme systems.

  • Vitamin B-Complex Supplement Products
  • And
    Vitamin B-2
    (Riboflavin)
    50 mg twice daily. Required for normal functioning of all cells, glands, and organs in the body.

  • Vitamin B-2 Supplement Products
  • And
    Vitamin B-12
    1,000 to 2,000 mcg three times daily, on an empty stomach. Use a lozenge or sublingual form for better absorption. B-12 is a necessary vitamin for nearly every cell in the body and the nervous system uses a great quantity. B-12 is also the hardest vitamin to absorb. Occasionally, oral supplementation will not suffice to replace the deficiency. However, start taking 1,000 mcg a month and recheck your levels in 3 months or so. If still low, you will needed to consider monthly injections. It will take six months before you seed the complete benefit from replacement. You cannot overdose yourself with this vitamin.

  • Vitamin B-12 Supplement Products
  • Helpful
    Brewers Yeast
    1 to 3 tablespoons daily and up or as directed on the label. Rich in many basic nutrients, especially the B-vitamins. A natural source of the B-vitamins.

  • Brewers Yeast Supplement Products
  • Essential Fatty Acids (EFA)
    As directed on label. Take with meals. For proper functioning of the thyroid gland. Needed for correct glandular function, to repair tissues, aid in healing, and restore proper fatty acid balance.

  • EFA Supplement Products
  • Kyolic EPA Supplement Products
  • Flaxseed Herbal Products
  • Black Currant Herbal Oil Products
  • Evening Primrose Herbal Oil Products
  • Fish Salmon Oil Supplement Products
  • Kyolic EPA
    As directed on label. Needed for correct glandular function.

  • Kyolic EPA EFA Supplement Products
  • Iron
    As directed by a health care provider. Take with 100 mg Vitamin C for better absorption. Essential for enzyme and hemoglobin production. Use ferrous chelate form or a natural, non-toxic form of iron from food sources. Caution: Do not take Iron unless anemia has been diagnosed.

  • Iron Supplement Products
  • Selenium
    As directed on label. If you are pregnant, do not exceed 40 mcg daily. A vital antioxidant that protects the immune system. Caution: Do not take supplemental Selenium if you are pregnant or have heart, kidney, or liver disease.

  • Selenium Supplement Products
  • Vitamin A
    15,000 IU daily. If you are pregnant, do not exceed 10,000 IU daily. Needed for proper immune function and for health eyes, skin, and hair. May be taken in a multivitamin complex.

  • Vitamin A Supplement Products
  • Beta Carotene
    & Carotene Complex
    Beta Carotene: 15,000 IU daily.
    Carotene Complex: As directed on label.
    Antioxidant and precursor to vitamin A. Note: If you have diabetes, omit beta carotene. People with diabetes cannot convert beta carotene into vitamin A.

  • Beta Carotene & Carotene Complex Supplement Products
  • Vitamin C
    With
    Bioflavonoids
    500 mg 4 times daily. Do not exceed this amount. Needed for immune function and stress hormone production. Caution: Do not take extremely high doses of Vitamin C as this may affect the production of thyroid hormone.

  • Vitamin C Supplement Products
  • Bioflavonoids Supplement Products
  • Vitamin E
    400 IU daily. Do not exceed this amount. An important antioxidant that improves circulation and immune response. A necessary nutrient, however, excessive amounts may stimulate the thyroid gland. Use d-alpha-tocopherol form.

  • Vitamin E Supplement Products
  • Zinc
    50 mg daily. Do not exceed a total of 100 mg daily from all supplements. An immune system stimulant. Use zinc gluconate lozenges or OptiZinc for best absorption.

  • Zinc Supplement Products
  • Calcium
    2,000 mg daily. For health bones. Thyroid medications are known to have osteoporosis side effects. If you take thyroid medication, wait 4 hours before taking calcium supplements since calcium can interfere with the uptake of the thyroid medication.

  • Calcium Supplement Products
  • Magnesium
    600 to 1,000 mg daily. To be taken in combination with calcium.

  • Magnesium Supplement Products





  • NOTIFY YOUR HEALTH CARE PROVIDER

    Call 9-1-1 or other emergency services immediately if you or a person you know has hypothyroidism and develops signs of myxedema coma, such as:
    • Mental deterioration, such as apathy, confusion, and psychosis.
    • Extreme weakness and fatigue that progress to loss of consciousness (coma).
    • Severe breathing difficulties, slow heart rate (less than 60 beats per minute), or low body temperature (95°F or below).
    See your health professional if you have any persistent symptoms, including:
    • Feeling tired, sluggish, or weak.
    • Memory problems, depression, or difficulty concentrating.
    • An inability to tolerate cold temperatures.
    • Dry skin, brittle nails, or a yellowish tint to the skin.
    • Constipation.
    • Heavy or irregular menstrual periods that may last longer than 5 to 7 days.
    • Other symptoms of hypothyroidism. See above in Symptoms.
    If you have one or two of the above symptoms that have not changed or have changed very little over a long period of time, it is less likely that the symptoms are caused by hypothyroidism. Consult your health care provider.

    If you are pregnant and have some of the above symptoms, talk to your health care provider or midwife. Also, if you have hypothyroidism and are pregnant or you are trying to become pregnant, talk to your health care provider. Your dose of thyroid hormone medication may need to be adjusted.

    Watchful waiting is not appropriate for hypothyroidism that is causing symptoms. Treatment should begin as soon as the condition is diagnosed using blood tests.

    Watchful waiting may be appropriate for certain adults with mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism whose blood tests show only modest changes. Talk to your health care provider about the treatment, its cost, and possible benefits. Watch for any signs that you may be developing hypothyroidism. Health care providers often want people to have yearly thyroid function blood tests to diagnose and treat worsening thyroid hormone production.

    MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Hyperthyroidism





    THYROID SUPPORT SUPPLEMENT PRODUCTS

  • Thyroid Support Supplement Products

  • Thyroid Glandular Supplement Products


  • QUALITY SUPPLIES & PRODUCTS


    FTC Advertising & Affilate Disclosure: This website has an affiliate relationship with certain merchants selling products and we recieve commissions from those sales to help support this website. Any products listed here are not listed by any rating system. We do not rate any product or post any feedback about products listed here. We leave this to the individual merchants to provide. We do not provide product prices or shopping carts since you do not order these products directly from us, but from the merchant providing the products. We only provide the link to that merchant webpage with all related product information and pricing. The products are listed here by merchant, product use, quantity size or volume, and for nutritional supplements - dosage per unit. All product descriptions are provided by the merchant or manufacturer and are not our descriptive review of the product. We do not endorse any specific product or attest to its effectiveness to treat any health condition or support nutritional requirements for any individual.


    THYROID SUPPORT SUPPLEMENT PRODUCTS

    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbsPro: N-Acetyl L-Tyrosine, Source Naturals, 300 mg, 30 Tabs
    HerbsPro: Bladderwrack, Eclectic Institute Inc, 50 Caps
    A fresh freeze-dried dietary supplement consisting of Bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosis, whole part) for female support, energy support and endocrine support. Take one to three capsules per day.
    HerbsPro: L-Tyrosine, Free Form Amino Acid, Source Naturals, 500 mg, 50 Tabs
    HerbsPro: Thyroid Health Formula, Natural Factors, 60 VCaps
    A dietary supplement formulated to nourish and support the thyroid. Ingredients in a two capsule serving include Pantothenic Acid (100 mg), Iodine (100 mcg), Copper (0.5 mg), Manganese (0.5 mg), L-Tyrosine (500 mg), Ashwagandha (150 mg), Guggul (120 mg). Take two capsules, once or twice per day or as directed by a health care provider.
    HerbsPro: Thyroid Support Homeopathic Medicine, NatraBio, 60 Tabs
    A homeopathic supplement with real thyroid. Ingredients include Calcarea Iodata 6X for thyroid function support, Fucus vesiculosus 6X for thyroid function and digestion, Kaly iodatum 6X for thyroid function support, Thyroidinum 6X, 12X, 30X for thyroid function. Calcarea Carbonica 10X for metabolism and weigh balance, poor nutrition. Causticum 10X for thyroid function support. Ferrum iodatum 10X, 30X for thyroid function, poor nutrition, exhaustion. Natrum Muriaticum 10X, 30X for thyroid glandular support. For adults and children over the age of 16 years, chew one tablet and allow to dissolve in the mouth three times daily. For children under the age of 16 concult a health care provider. For best results, take in a clean mouth.
    HerbsPro: Thyroid Balance, For Healthy Thyroid Function, Dr. Venessa's Formulas, 60 Caps
    HerbsPro: Vegetarian Thyroid Support (Kosher), Only Natural, 60 VCaps
    Ayurvedic kosher thyroid support dietary supplement. Ingredients include Kelp, D-3, Iodide and Forskohlii. Take two capsules daily preferably with a meal or as directed by your health care professional.
    HerbsPro: Thyrox T-3, Absolute Nutrition, 60 Plus 60 Caps - BOGO
    A dietary supplement designed to boost thyroid output and metabolism. Stimulant free.
    HerbsPro: Thyro-Max RR, Country Life, 60 Tabs
    A nutritional aid to support the thyroid gland. A rapid release two tablet serving dietary supplement containing Vitamin B-1 Thiamin (30 mg), Vitamin B-2 Riboflavin (50 mg), Vitamin B-3 Niacinamide & Niacin (50 mg), Iodine as Kelp (450 mcg), Magnesium (200 mg), Zinc (10 mg), Manganese (10 mg), Potassium (198 mg), L-Tyrosine Free Form (500 mg), and L-Aspartic Acid Free Form (200 mg). Adults take two tablets daily. For best utilization, take between meals. Do not exceed recommended dose.
    HerbsPro: Extra Virgin Coconut Oil, Source Naturals, 1 gram, 60 Softgels
    A healthy natural oil dietary supplement with medium chain fatty acids. Take four (4 grams) to eight (8 grams) softgels daily with meals.
    HerbsPro: Potassium Iodide, Source Naturals, 32.5 mg, 60 Tabs
    A dietary supplement for maintaining health levels of beneficial Iodide in the Thyroid Glands. Each serving size tablet contains Calcium (72 mg) and Potassium Iodide (32.5 mg). Use only as directed. For short-term only (up to 10 days). Adults and adolescents take up to four tablets once daily. For children ages three to twelve years take up to two tablets once daily. For children one to three years take one tablet once daily. For children under one year, consult with your health care provider before use.
    HerbsPro: Thyroid Energy, Now Foods, 90 VCaps
    Dietary supplement supports health metabolism and healthy thyroid function. A two capsule serving contains Vitamin B-6 (2 mg), Folic Acid (400 mcg), Vitamin B-12 (60 mcg), Iodine from Potassium Iodide (225 mcg), Zinc (25 mg), Selenium (50 mcg), Copper Chelate (1 mg), L-Tyrosine (1,000 mg), Guggul (75 mg), Ashwagandha (50 mg). As a dietary supplement, take two capsules daily, preferably in divided doses.
    HerbsPro: Thyroset, North American Herb & Spice, 550 mg, 90 Caps
    A L-Thyrosine enhanced, wild mountain herb dietary supplement. Natural iodine and nutrients in natural wild kelp with the power of nature. A two capsule serving (1,100 mg) consists of a proprietary blend of Northern Pacific Wild Kelp, Wild Oregano Herb, Wild Rosemary Herb. Take two or more capsules twice daily.
    HerbsPro: Thyroid Support Complex, Natural Sources, 60 Caps
    HerbsPro: Bladderwrack Thallus, Natures Answer, 250 mg, 90 Caps
    HerbsPro: Thyroid Care Metabolizer, Kroeger Herb, 400 mg, 100 VCaps
    Herbal supplement maintains a balanced and healthy thyroid and metabolism. A 2 capsule (800 mg) serving contains a proprietary herbal blend of Yellow Dock root (Rumex crispus), Cleavers herb (Galium aparine), Goldenseal root (Hydrastis canadensis), White Willow bark (Salix alba), Club Moss herb (Lycopodium clavatum), Uva Ursi leaf (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi).
    HerbsPro: Thyroid Maintenance, Dr. Christophers Formulas, 475 mg, 100 VCaps
    A supplement for thyroid support. A two capsule serving (950 mg) consists of a proprietary herbal blend of Organic Kelp plant, Watercress plant, Wildcrafted Nettle leaf, Wildcrafted Mullein leaf, Parsley leaf, Organic Irish Moss, and Organic Sheep Sorrel herb. As a dietary supplement, take two capsules three times daily, or as directed by your health care provider.
    HerbsPro: Herbal Thyroid, Dr. Christophers Formulas, 475 mg, 100 VCaps
    Herbal formulation to help an inactive thyroid function. This formula contains a proprietary blend of Fo-Ti Root, Gotu Kola Herb, Guaranna Seed, Organic Siberian Eleuthero Root, Wildcrafted Mullein Leaf, and Organic Kelp Plant. As a dietary supplement, take two capsules (950 mg) twice daily, or as directed by your health care provider.
    HerbsPro: Metabolic Advantage Thyroid &Tyrosine Complex, Enzymatic Therapy, 100 Caps
    A dietary supplement that enhances thyroid health, influences metabolism, supports weight loss. A two capsule serving provides Vitamin B-12 (100 mcg), Iodine (200 mcg), Magnesium (200 mg), Zinc (6 mg), Copper (300 mcg), Manganese (2.3 mg), Molybdenum (100 mcg), Sodium (20 mg), L-Tyrosine (248 mg), Multiglandular Complex of Liver, Lung, Pancreas, Heart, Kidney, & Spleen (70 mg), Thyroxin-Free Thyroid (8 mg). Take two capsule three times daily.
    HerbsPro: L-Tyrosine, Free Form Amino Acid, TwinLab, 500 mg, 100 Caps
    HerbsPro: Kelp Plant, Dr. Christopher's Formulas, 660 mg, 100 VCaps
    Each one capsule serving contains 660 mg sea harvested, wildcrafted kelp plant (Ascophyllum nodosum).
    HerbsPro: Kelp, Nature's Way, 100 Caps
    Natural Iodine source premium herbal dietary supplement. Supplement contains Iron (390 mcg), Iodine (400 mcg), Sodium (20 mg), and Whole Thallus Kelp (660 mg) per capsule. Take one capsule daily, preferably with food. Do not exceed recommended dose. As a dietary supplement take one capsule with meals or a glass of water.
    HerbsPro: Bladderwrack Whole Herb, Nature's Way, 580 mg, 100 VCaps
    Premium herbal iodine source dietary supplement. One capsule serving contains iron (340 mcg), Iodine (232 mcg), Sodium (10 mg), and Whole Thallus Bladderwrack (f580 mg). Take one capsule daily, preferably with food. Do not exceed recommended dose.
    HerbsPro: Guggulipid, Natrol, 500 mg Extract, 12.5 mg Guggulsterones, 100 Caps
    Dietary supplement helps maintain cholesterol levels already within normal range. Contains 500 mg Guggulipid extract (Commiphora mukul gum resin) and 12.5 mg Guggulsterones 2.5%. Take one capsule two times daily, with meals.
    HerbsPro: ThyroSense Thyroid Formula, Natural Factors, 120 VCaps
    A dietary supplement nourishes and supports thyroid health. Take two capsules with breakfast or directed by a health professional. Up to four capsules can be taken daily.
    HerbsPro: Thyroid Support, Gaia Herbs, 120 Caps
    A dietary supplement promotes a healthy metabolism, supports healthy thyroid function and thyroid hormones.
    HerbsPro: Thyroid Support, A. Vogel Bioforce USA, 120 Tabs
    A herbal extract dietary supplement product from Switzerland consisting of Kelp Thallus extract. Adults take 1 tablet (25 mg) two to three times daily before a meal. Do not take before retiring.
    HerbsPro: Thyroid Balance, Dr. Venessa's Formula, 120 Caps
    Clinically formulated to help regulate healthy metabolism and to counteract the symptoms of hyper or hypothyroidism, such as weight gain, thinning hair, poor circulation, mood swings, and other hormonal imbalances.
    HerbsPro: Thyroid Basics, Foodscience of Vermont, 120 Caps
    A dietary supplement to support thyroid function and health. Each 2 capsule serving contains Vitamin B-2 (5 mg), Vitamin B-6 (25 mg), Folic Acid (500 mcg), Iodine as Potassium Iodide (225 mcg), Zinc Glycinate (10 mg), Selenium (50 mcg), Manganese (5 mg), Chromium Polynicotinate (50 mcg), L-Tyrosine (500 mg), Bacopa Monnieri extract (200 mg), Bacosides (40 mg), Coleus Forskohlii (100 mg), Forskolin (10 mg). As a dietary supplement, take two capsules with food, twice daily until results occur.
    HerbsPro: Coconut Oil Diet Natural Weight Loss Support, Health Support, 1,000 mg, 120 Softgels
    MCT weight loss support, naturally safe and effective. Contains no stimulants, caffeine free. Helps to reduce sugar cravings. Supports health immune system. Each three softgels serving contains 3,000 mg cold pressed extra virgin unrefined organic coconut oil. Adults take one to two capsules three times a day, before meals with an eight ounce glass of water.
    HerbsPro: Thyroid Energy, Now Foods, 180 VCaps
    A healthy thyroid support dietary supplements that supports healthy metabolism. Ingredients include Vitamin B-6 (2 mg), Folic Acid (400 mcg), Vitamin B-12 (60 mcg), Iodine from Kelp and Irish Moss (225 mcg), Zinc from L-OptiZinc and Zinc L-Methionine Complex (25 mg), Selenium 50 mcg), Copper Chelate (1 mg), L-Tyrosine (1,000 mg), Irish Moss (200 mg), Guggul (75 mg), Organic Kelp (60 mg), Ashwagandha (50 mg), and Trace Minerals Concentrate (5 mg). As a dietary supplement, take 2 VCaps two times daily. preferably on an empty stomach. If you experience any mild nausea, consider taking with meals, if nausea persists, disconinue use.
    HerbsPro: Thyrox T-3, Absolute Nutrition, 180 Caps
    A dietary supplement designed to boost thyroid output and metabolism. For reduced calorie diets that have been shown to lower metabolism. Stimulant free. Thyroid T3 is designed to aid a sluggish metabolism brought on by dieting. The thyroid controls the rate of metabolism and Thyroid T3 contains nutrients that increase thyroid output and increase the body's metabolic rate without the use of stimulants. Ingredients include Calcium Phosphate (250 mg), Gum Guggul Extract with Guggulesterone 10% (300 mg), L-Tyrosine (300 mg), Garcinia Cambogia (200 mg), Dipotassium Phosphate (150 mg), Sodium Phosphate (75 mg), Disodium Phosphate (75 mg), Phosphatidyl Choline (25 mg). For dietary support, take four to six capsule daily. Use two capsules per serving, two to three services throughout each day. For best results, take six capsules per day. Do not exceed recommended dosage. Allow three to four weeks for optimum results.
    HerbsPro: Metabolic Advantage, Enzymatic Therapy, 180 Caps
    A dietary supplement that enhances thyroid health, influences metabolism, supports weight loss. Ingredients per two tablet dose include Vitamin B-12 (100 mcg), Iodine (200 mcg), Magnesium (200 mg), Zinc (6 mg), Copper (300 mcg), Manganese (2.3 mg), Molybdenum (100 mcg), Sodium (20 mg), L-Tyrosine (248 mg), Multiglandular Complex of Liver, Lung, Pancreas, Heart, Kidney, & Spleen (70 mg), Thyroxin-Free Thyroid (8 mg). Take two capsule three times daily.
    HerbsPro: Potassium Plus Iodine, Now Foods, 180 Tabs
    Thyroid support dietary supplement. Supports electrolyte mineral balance, safe iodide potency, vegetarian formula. One serving size tablet contains Iodine from Potassium Iodide (225 mcg), Sodium from Sodium Alginate (5 mg), Potassium from Potassium Chloride & Iodide (99 mg), Sodium Alginate (100 mg). As a dietary supplement, take one tablet daily, preferably with meals.
    HerbsPro: Kelp, Green Superfood, Now Foods, 150 mcg Iodine, 200 Tabs
    A genuine whole food dietary supplement that supports thyroid function. A green superfood and vegetarian formula. Iodine is from Kelp (Laminaria digitata & Ascophyllum nodosum). Take one tablet daily, preferably with meals or as directed by your health care provider. Consider taking this product in combination with Thyroid Energy, L-Tyrosine and Organic Virgin Coconut Oil. These tablets are smaller and easier to swallow than most Kelp tablets, as they contain less filler.


    Liquid Supplements

    HerbsPro: Thyadine, Natural Balance, 0.5 fl. oz.
    A dietary supplement that supports a normal thyroid with rich bio-available Iodine. Iodine supplements are commonly made from iodine salts (ammonia or potassium iodide) which have to be broken down by the body before the iodine can be absorbed and utilized reducing their effectiveness. Additionally neither capsules or tablets absorb as effectively as liquid iodine. Thyadine colloidal iodine is totall unique in that it provides pure stabilized iodine without forming an iodine salt. One drop of Thyadine provides 150 mcg of iodine. Other ingredients include Fucus vesiculosus 3X, thyroid 3X. Spongia tosta 12X, thyroid 30C with glycerine, deionized water and ethanol. Take one drop on or under the tongue once daily as needed or as directed by your health care practitioner.
    HerbsPro: Thyroid Calming Compound, Bugleweed & Motherwort, Herb Pharm, 1 fl. oz.
    Herbal supplement for endocrine system restoration. An extract blend of Bugleweed flowering herb, Motherwort flowering tops, Cactus stem, and Lemon Balm leaf and flower tops. Certified organically grown and custom wildcrafted, fresh undried and shade-dried herbs in distilled water, vegetable glycerine, certified organic grain alcohol. Add one full squeeze of the dropper bulb to two ounces of water or juice, two or four times per day. Best taken between meals.
    HerbsPro: Bladderwrack Extract, Natures Answer, 1 fl. oz.
    Holistically balanced, kosher parve, organic alcohol fluid extract (1:1) Thallus, Fucus vesiculosus herbal supplement. Each 1 ml (28 drops) serving contains 1,000 mg (1 gram) Bladderwrack (Fucus Vesiculosus) Thallus Extract.
    HerbsPro: Liquid Kelp, Natural Factors, 800 mcg, 1.6 fl. oz.
    A dietary supplement used to support a healthy thyroid gland. One drop serving provides 800 mcg iodine from kelp and potassium iodide. For adults, take one drop per day or as directed by a health care provider.
    HerbsPro: Atomidine Water Soluble Iodine Compound, Heritage Products, 2 fl. oz.
    The solution that naturally supports energy, weight loss, metabolism, calcium absorption, and glandular function. An iodine dietary supplement. One drop serving size provides 600 mcg iodine per serving. For adults, take one drop in water in the morning and use only as directed.
    HerbsPro: Sea Adine, Bio-Available Liquid Iodine, Heritage Products, 2 fl. oz.
    HerbsPro: Kelp Iodine Liquid Supplement, Daily Iodine, World Organics, 2 fl. oz.
    Dietary supplement for the support of the thyroid gland. A decoction of Atlantic Kelp (fucus vesiculosus), potassium iodide (to standardize potency), potassium benzoate. Serving size for adults is 4 drops of liquid daily in a glass of water or with meals to provide 150 mcg iodine. Use as directed by your health care provider.
    HerbsPro: Bugleweed Extract, Flowering Herb, Herb Pharm, 4 fl. oz.
    HerbsPro: Kelp Powder, Now Foods, 8 oz.
    A pure powder green superfood dietary supplement rich in natural iodine and support healthy thyroid function. Vegetarian-Vegan. A two level scoop serivng size (200 mg) contains Iodine (270 mcg) and Laminaria digitata & Ascophyllum nodosum Kelp (200 mg). Take a two scoop serving daily, preferably with food.
    HerbsPro: Coconut Oil, Extra Virgin Organic, Natures Way, 16 oz.
    Pure and unrefined, cold pressed coconut oil. May be used for cooking in place of butter, margarin, shortening or other cooking oils or for baking or frying in temperatures up to 350°F. May also be used as a dietary supplement. Serving size is one tablespoon (14 grams) up to 4 times daily. No refrigeration is necessary.
    HerbsPro: Coconut Oil, 100% Organic, Jarrow Formulas, 454 grams
    Certified organic coconut oil ideal for cooking, neutral taste and flavor, no hydrogenation, no trans fatty acids, source of medium chain triglycerides, suitable for vegans.
    HerbsPro: Coconut Oil, Extra Organic Virgin, Garden of Life, 32 oz.
    Certified organic living foods, delicious flavor, vegetarian.


    Raw Thyroid Glandular

    HerbsPro: Raw Thyroid, Natural Sources, 50 Tabs
    HerbsPro: Raw Thyroid, Natural Sources, 60 Caps
    HerbsPro: Raw Thyroid, Natural Sources, 90 Caps
    HerbsPro: Raw Thyroid, Natural Sources, 180 Caps
    HerbsPro: TG-100 Glandular, Nutricology Allergy Research Group, 100 Caps (63775)
    Supports the thyroid gland and the glands associated with thyroid function. Nutri-Cology Allergy Research Group, TG 100 Organic Glandulars. Hypoallergenic. All glandulars are bovine-source. The contents of the pull-apart, low-antigen gelatin capsules may be removed if preferred. TG 100 Organic Glandulars. This glandular formulation is processed by lyophilization of glands derived from government-inspected, range-fed animals, raised in New Zealand or Australia without hormones or antibiotics. The glandular material is frozen, then subjected to a high vacuum that vaporizes moisture directly from the solid state, thereby maintaining biological activity of the enzymes and hormones..
    HerbsPro: Raw Thyroid, Ultra Glandulars, 200 mg, 90 Tabs
    Excellent in quality, a freeze-dried glandular concentrate dietary supplement. Raw Thyroid Tissue, thyroxin free, freeze-dried, defatted, uncut, 100% pure, & BSE free from New Zealand (200 mg per tablet). Take one tablet daily or as prescribed by your health care provider.


    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Thyroid Support, Natra-Bio, 60 Tabs: K
    Providing glandular support for the symptoms of low energy, low metabolism, cold hands and feet, melancholy, and restlessness. Ingredients include Calcarea Iodata 6X (thyroid function support), Fucus Vesiculosus 6X (thyroid function, digestion), Kali Iodatum 6X (thyroid function support), Calcarea Carbonica 10X (metabolism & weight), Calcarea Carbonica 10X (Balance, Poor Nutrition), Causticum 10X (thyroid function support), Ferrum Iodatum 10X, 30X (Thyroid Function, Poor Nutrition, Exhaustion), Natrum Muriaticum 10X, 30X (thyroid glandular support).
    Kalyx: 50-Plus Mini Tab Multi-Age Defense Formula, Rainbow Light, 90 Mini-Tabs: K
    Comprehensive, Food-Based Multivitamin/Mineral - goes beyond mineral 100% DV potencies, providing optimal protection for adults age 50-plus. Formula contains 1,000 IU Vitamin D which protects bone strength, promotes calcium absorption, strengthens nerves and muscles surrounding bones and supports enhanced immune function, colon and breast health, potent B-Complex that promotes increased energy and healthy stress management; supports long-term brain and heart health, extra antioxidant protection consisting of 1,000 mcg lutein and 500 mcg lycopene, plus a range of antioxidant vitamins, minerals and botanicals, and probiotics and plant-source enzymes providing maximum support for daily digestive health with broad-spectrum enzymes plus 90,000,000 bio-activated probiotics.
    Kalyx: Thyroid Complete, Liquid Extract, Natures Answer, 90 VCaps: K
    Kalyx: Thyroid & Pituitary Extract, Health & Herbs, 2 fl oz: HH
    Herbal ingredients include Kelp, Parsley, Dulse Leaf, Irish Moss, Licorice, Bayberry, Bugleweed, Cayenne Pepper, Structured Water, 15 to 30% Grain Alcohol USP. Use 6 to 12 drops in juice, water, under the tongue, or as desired. May be taken 3 times daily. Shake well. Store in cool, dark place. Keep out of reach of children.
    Kalyx: Thyroid & Pituitary Extract, Health & Herbs, 8 fl oz: HH
    Herbal ingredients include Kelp, Parsley, Dulse Leaf, Irish Moss, Licorice, Bayberry, Bugleweed, Cayenne Pepper, Structured Water, 15 to 30% Grain Alcohol USP. Use 6 to 12 drops in juice, water, under the tongue, or as desired. May be taken 3 times daily. Shake well. Store in cool, dark place. Keep out of reach of children.
    Kalyx: Thyroid & Pituitary Extract, Health & Herbs, 16 fl oz: HH
    Herbal ingredients include Kelp, Parsley, Dulse Leaf, Irish Moss, Licorice, Bayberry, Bugleweed, Cayenne Pepper, Structured Water, 15 to 30% Grain Alcohol USP. Use 6 to 12 drops in juice, water, under the tongue, or as desired. May be taken 3 times daily. Shake well. Store in cool, dark place. Keep out of reach of children.
    Kalyx: Thyroid & Pituitary Extract, Health & Herbs, 32 fl oz: HH
    Herbal ingredients include Kelp, Parsley, Dulse Leaf, Irish Moss, Licorice, Bayberry, Bugleweed, Cayenne Pepper, Structured Water, 15 to 30% Grain Alcohol USP. Use 6 to 12 drops in juice, water, under the tongue, or as desired. May be taken 3 times daily. Shake well. Store in cool, dark place. Keep out of reach of children.
    Kalyx: Thyroid & Pituitary Extract, Non-Alcoholic, Health & Herbs, 2 fl oz: HH
    Herbal ingredients include Kelp, Parsley, Dulse Leaf, Irish Moss, Licorice, Bayberry, Bugleweed, Cayenne Pepper, Structured Water, Glycerine USP. Use 6 to 12 drops in juice, water, under the tongue, or as desired. May be taken 3 times daily. Shake well. Store in cool, dark place. Keep out of reach of children.
    Kalyx: Thyroid & Pituitary Extract, Non-Alcoholic, Health & Herbs, 8 fl oz: HH
    Herbal ingredients include Kelp, Parsley, Dulse Leaf, Irish Moss, Licorice, Bayberry, Bugleweed, Cayenne Pepper, Structured Water, Glycerine USP. Use 6 to 12 drops in juice, water, under the tongue, or as desired. May be taken 3 times daily. Shake well. Store in cool, dark place. Keep out of reach of children.
    Kalyx: Thyroid & Pituitary Extract, Non-Alcoholic, Health & Herbs, 16 fl oz: HH
    Herbal ingredients include Kelp, Parsley, Dulse Leaf, Irish Moss, Licorice, Bayberry, Bugleweed, Cayenne Pepper, Structured Water, Glycerine USP. Use 6 to 12 drops in juice, water, under the tongue, or as desired. May be taken 3 times daily. Shake well. Store in cool, dark place. Keep out of reach of children.


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Hyperthyroid Support Supplement Products
    Amazon: Hypothyroid Support Supplement Products
    Amazon: Thyroid Supplement Products
    Amazon: Thyroid Health Education Books



    THYROID GLANDULAR SUPPLEMENT PRODUCTS

    The thyroid gland is one of the most significant of the endocrine glands which produces secretions that regulate the basic processes of the body. It lies in the front part of the throat along the windpipe.

    HERBSPRO PRODUCTS

    HerbsPro: Raw Thyroid, Natural Sources, 60 Caps (27817)
    HerbsPro: Raw Thyroid, Natural Sources, 90 Caps (27821)
    HerbsPro: Raw Thyroid, Natural Sources, 180 Caps (108603)
    HerbsPro: TG-100 Glandular, Nutricology Allergy Research Group, 100 Caps (63775)
    Supports the thyroid gland and the glands associated with thyroid function. Nutri-Cology Allergy Research Group, TG 100 Organic Glandulars. Hypoallergenic. All glandulars are bovine-source. The contents of the pull-apart, low-antigen gelatin capsules may be removed if preferred. TG 100 Organic Glandulars. This glandular formulation is processed by lyophilization of glands derived from government-inspected, range-fed animals, raised in New Zealand or Australia without hormones or antibiotics. The glandular material is frozen, then subjected to a high vacuum that vaporizes moisture directly from the solid state, thereby maintaining biological activity of the enzymes and hormones..
    HerbsPro: Raw Thyroid, Ultra Glandulars, 200 mg, 90 Tabs (50357)


    KALYX PRODUCTS

    Kalyx: Raw Thyroid Glandular, Natural Sources, 60 Tabs: HF
    Raw Thyroid Glandular Concentrate with Synergistic Complex Ultra Raw Thyroid is a glandular extract of the endocrine gland responsible for controlling metabolism and growth and may benefit individuals with slow metabolism, low energy, melancholy, cold hands and feet, and restlessness. New. Easy to Digest Capsules. Dietary Supplement. Whole Raw tissue concentrated from bovine sources specially processed (freeze-dried) at or below -5°C to preserve natural occurring vitamins, enzymes, nucleotides, lipoproteins and all other cellular components. Raw tissue concentrates imported from New Zealand are made from toxin-free lyophilized glands from animals grazed on rangeland free of pesticides, growth hormones, antibiotics or chemical additives. Free Of Sugar, starch, preservatives, artificial colors, artificial flavorings, corn, what, yeast, soy, milk, toxin, pesticides, growth hormones, antibiotics, chemical additives.
    Kalyx: Thyro Complex Glandular, Progressive Laboratories, 90 Caps: HF
    Glandular Complex The thyroid hormones thyroxin (T4) and Tri-iodothyronine (T3), regulate growth and metabolism. Glandular concentrates from healthy glands have been found beneficial for growth, repair and balance of weak or malfunctioning glands because they contain naturally occurring minerals, vitamins, raw enzymes, nucleo-proteins (RNA/DNA sometimes called protomorphogens) and tissue-activating proteins specific to that particular gland. Thyro Complex contains thyroxin-free thyroid concentrate along with raw adrenal, pituitary and spleen concentrates which work synergistically to support the thyroid and normalize its function as part of the delicate endocrine system. Kelp is included as a rich source of organic iodine, which aids in the development and function of the thyroid and is an integral part of thyroxin. Iodine deficiency leads to enlargement of the thyroid gland known as goiter and hypothyroidism.
    Kalyx: Raw Thyroid Glandular, Natural Sources, 90 Caps: HF
    Raw Thyroid Glandular Concentrate with Synergestic Complex New Easy to Digest Capsules Ultra Raw Thyroid is a glandular extract of the endocrine gland responsible for controlling metabolism and growth and may benefit individuals with slow metabolism, low energy, melancholy, cold hands and feet, and restlessness. Whole Raw tissue concentrated from bovine sources specially processed (freeze-dried) at or below -5°C to preserve natural occurring vitamins, enzymes, nucleotides, lipoproteins and all other cellular components. Raw tissue concentrates imported from New Zealand are made from toxin-free lyophilized glands from animals grazed on rangeland free of pesticides, growth hormones, antibiotics or chemical additives. Free Of Sugar, starch, preservatives, artificial colors or flavorings, corn, what, yeast, soy, milk derivatives, pesticides, growth hormones, antibiotics,chemical additives.
    Kalyx: TG100 Glandular, Nutricology, 100 Caps: HF
    Provides tissue from the thyroid gland, and other glands associated with thyroid function. This natural glandular material is derived from government-inspected, range-fed animals, raised in New Zealand and Australia, whose animal husbandry regulations are among the strictest in the world. The material is lyophilized, which means it is immediately frozen, then subjected to a high vacuum that vaporizes moisture directly from the solid state. These nutrients are of the highest quality and purity obtainable, and do not contain preservatives, diluents, or artificial additives.


    AMAZON PRODUCTS

    Amazon: Thyroid Glandular (Thyroxin-Free), Swanson Premium, 200 mg, 60 Caps
    Amazon: Raw Thyroid Glandular, Natural Sources, 390 mg, 90 Caps
    Amazon: Thyroid Glandular, American Biologics, 130 mg, 90 Tabs
    Amazon: Raw Thyroid Glandular, Ultra Glandulars, 90 Tabs


  • Nutrition Basics: Glandular Supplement Information






  • MoonDragon's Womens Health Index

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    Health & Wellness Index





    AROMATHERAPY: ESSENTIAL OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Allspice Leaf Oil
    Angelica Oil
    Anise Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Basil Oil
    Bay Laurel Oil
    Bay Oil
    Benzoin Oil
    Bergamot Oil
    Black Pepper Oil
    Chamomile (German) Oil
    Cajuput Oil
    Calamus Oil
    Camphor (White) Oil
    Caraway Oil
    Cardamom Oil
    Carrot Seed Oil
    Catnip Oil
    Cedarwood Oil
    Chamomile Oil
    Cinnamon Oil
    Citronella Oil
    Clary-Sage Oil
    Clove Oil
    Coriander Oil
    Cypress Oil
    Dill Oil
    Eucalyptus Oil
    Fennel Oil
    Fir Needle Oil
    Frankincense Oil
    Geranium Oil
    German Chamomile Oil
    Ginger Oil
    Grapefruit Oil
    Helichrysum Oil
    Hyssop Oil
    Iris-Root Oil
    Jasmine Oil
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    Labdanum Oil
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    Lemon-Balm Oil
    Lemongrass Oil
    Lemon Oil
    Lime Oil
    Longleaf-Pine Oil
    Mandarin Oil
    Marjoram Oil
    Mimosa Oil
    Myrrh Oil
    Myrtle Oil
    Neroli Oil
    Niaouli Oil
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    Orange Oil
    Oregano Oil
    Palmarosa Oil
    Patchouli Oil
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    Peru-Balsam Oil
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    Pine-Needle Oil
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    Rosemary Oil
    Rose Oil
    Rosewood Oil
    Sage Oil
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    Thyme Oil
    Vanilla Oil
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    Violet Oil
    White-Camphor Oil
    Yarrow Oil
    Ylang-Ylang Oil
    Aromatherapy
    Healing Baths For Colds
    Aromatherapy
    Herbal Cleansers
    Using Essential Oils


    AROMATHERAPY: HERBAL & CARRIER OILS DESCRIPTIONS & USES


    Almond, Sweet Oil
    Apricot Kernel Oil
    Argan Oil
    Arnica Oil
    Avocado Oil
    Baobab Oil
    Black Cumin Oil
    Black Currant Oil
    Black Seed Oil
    Borage Seed Oil
    Calendula Oil
    Camelina Oil
    Castor Oil
    Coconut Oil
    Comfrey Oil
    Evening Primrose Oil
    Flaxseed Oil
    Grapeseed Oil
    Hazelnut Oil
    Hemp Seed Oil
    Jojoba Oil
    Kukui Nut Oil
    Macadamia Nut Oil
    Meadowfoam Seed Oil
    Mullein Oil
    Neem Oil
    Olive Oil
    Palm Oil
    Plantain Oil
    Plum Kernel Oil
    Poke Root Oil
    Pomegranate Seed Oil
    Pumpkin Seed Oil
    Rosehip Seed Oil
    Safflower Oil
    Sea Buckthorn Oil
    Sesame Seed Oil
    Shea Nut Oil
    Soybean Oil
    St. Johns Wort Oil
    Sunflower Oil
    Tamanu Oil
    Vitamin E Oil
    Wheat Germ Oil





    HELPFUL RELATED MOONDRAGON NUTRITION BASICS LINKS

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Amino Acids Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Antioxidants Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Enzymes Information
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Herbs Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Homeopathics Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Hydrosols Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Minerals Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Mineral Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary & Cosmetic Supplements Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Dietary Supplements Introduction
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Specialty Supplements
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Vitamins Introduction


  • NUTRITION BASICS ARTICLES

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: 4 Basic Nutrients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Foods That Contain Additives & Artificial Ingredients
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Is Aspartame A Safe Sugar Substitute?
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Guidelines For Selecting & Preparing Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Destroy
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Foods That Heal
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: The Micronutrients: Vitamins & Minerals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Avoid Overcooking Your Foods
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Phytochemicals
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Increase Your Consumption of Raw Produce
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Limit Your Use of Salt
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Use Proper Cooking Utensils
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Basics: Choosing The Best Water & Types of Water





  • RELATED MOONDRAGON HEALTH LINKS & INFORMATION

  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Therapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Analysis Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Diet Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutritional Recipe Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Therapy: Preparing Produce for Juicing
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Additives Index
  • MoonDragon's Nutrition Information: Food Safety Links
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Index
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Articles
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Back Pain
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  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Blending Chart
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Essential Oil Details
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  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Miscarriage
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Post Partum
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Childbearing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy For Problems in Pregnancy & Birthing
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #1
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Chart of Essential Oils #2
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Tips
  • MoonDragon's Aromatherapy Uses
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Index
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  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Touch & Movement Therapies Index
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health Therapy: Touch & Movement: Aromatherapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Therapy: Touch & Movement - Massage Therapy
  • MoonDragon's Alternative Health: Therapeutic Massage
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 1
  • MoonDragon's Holistic Health Links Page 2
  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Nutrition Basics Index
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  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Massage Therapy
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  • MoonDragon's Health & Wellness: Therapy - Herbal Oils Index







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